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Full text of "By design 2 : grants awarded by the Design Arts Program, National Endowment for the Arts, 1977-1987"

by design 2 



Grants Awarded by the 
Design Arts Program 
National Endowment for the Arts 
1977-1987 



Published by 

Partners for Livable Places 
Washington, D.C. 
September 1989 



The Design Arts Program is one of twelve discipline programs in 
the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency. The pro- 
gram's mission is to promote excellence in the fields of architec- 
ture, landscape architecture, urban design and planning, historic 
preservation, interior design, industrial design, graphic design and 
fashion design. This is accomplished through grants and leadership 
initiatives that have the potential for producing results of excep- 
tional merit and national or regional significance. Panels of distin- 
guished designers evaluate the applications and make recommen- 
dations for final action by the National Council on the Arts and 
the chairman of the Arts Endowment. 

Randolph M.N. McAusland, Director 
Design Arts Program 

Marcia Sartwell, Editor-in-Chief 

Rebecca KrafTt, Editor, Grants 

Lynne Komai, Designer 

John Kinnaird, Illustrator 

Ursula Aylor, Production Manager 

Material in this book is in the public domain and may be re- 
printed, in whole or in part, provided that no changes are made in 
the text and that credit is given to the National Endowment for 
the Arts. 

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data 

By design 2: grants awarded by the Design Arts Program, Na- 
tional Endowment for the Arts, 1977-1987 / [Marcia Sartwell, 
editor-in-chief], 
p. cm. 

"September 1989." 

Sequel to: By design. 

$15.00 

1 . Architectural design — Scholarships, fellowships, etc. — 
United States. 2. Design — Scholarships, fellowships, etc. — 
United States. I. Sartwell, Marcia. II. National Endowment for 
the Arts. Design Arts Program. III. Title: By design two. 
NA2750.B88 1989 89-22851 

729— dc20 CIP 

Published and distributed by: 
Partners for Livable Places 
1429 21st St., N.W. 
Washington, D.C. 20036 



Acknowledgments 



Many persons worked hard to bring By Design 2 into being. Special 
thanks go to Rebecca Krafft, who organized and described the more 
than 2,300 grants in this book; to Jeffrey Soule, whose knowledge of 
the design field made him a valuable advisor; to Stephanie Koziski 
Olson and Betsy Moore, whose resourcefulness in researching photos 
has contributed much to the visual quality of the book; to Ruth 
Kelliher of Partners for Livable Places for steady administrative 
support; to Ellen Hornbeck of the Livability Clearinghouse for assis- 
tance in the initial phases of the project; and especially to Randolph 
McAusland, Director of the Design Arts Program, for his leadership 
and wise editorial guidance. 

— M.S. 



Table of Contents 



Preface i 

Introduction iii 

CHAPTER ONE: Design for Communities 1 

How designers and civic leaders improve the 
quality of cities and towns. Includes architec- 
ture, historic preservation, planning and urban 
design projects. 

Revitalization 3 

Historic Preservation Techniques 10 

Historic Preservation Projects 24 

Urban Design and Planning 29 

Civics and Education 44 

Promoting Multicultural Diversity 56 

Public Places 61 

CHAPTER TWO: Design for the Environment 67 

How design conserves the natural environment 
and integrates greenery and natural elements 
into the built environment. Includes landscape 
architecture projects, sensitive planning for nat- 
ural and scenic areas, energy-saving designs for 
commercial and residential structures and 
blighted areas transformed into recreational 
spaces. 

Landscape Architecture 69 

Land Use and Energy Conservation 75 

Parks and Open Spaces 82 

Waterfront Projects 88 



CHAPTER THREE: Design for the Arts 93 

How architecture and design contribute to the 
arts. Includes design planning for construction 
and renovation of arts facilities serving all disci- 
plines, with particular emphasis on restoration 
or reuse of historic structures. Also contains 
collaborative projects between artists and de- 
sign professionals and projects in scenic, cos- 
tume, lighting and exhibit design. 

Cultural Planning 95 

Performing Arts 102 

Visual and Media Arts 114 

Community Arts Centers 118 

Collaborations in Design, Art and Architecture 125 

Educational Facilities and Programs 131 

Artists' Housing and Studio Space 133 

Design Behind the Scenes 136 

CHAPTER FOUR: Design for Individuals 141 

How design disciplines contribute to the im- 
provement of the quality of an individual's ev- 
eryday life, with emphasis on barrier-free de- 
sign for those with special needs. Includes 
projects and research for housing, furnishings, 
mass-produced consumer goods, clothing and 
graphics. Also includes design and educational 
projects for children. 

Housing Solutions 143 

Interior Design 147 

Industrial Design 150 

Graphic Design 154 

Fashion Design 160 

Barrier-Free Design 163 

Projects for Children 166 



CHAPTER FIVE: Design Education and 

Professional Advancement 173 

Projects and programs aimed at improving the 
skills of design practitioners and enhancing 
communication among them. Includes profes- 
sional and student fellowships, symposia, exhib- 
its and films, design-competition management 
and professional resource centers. 

Books, Journals and Articles 175 

Fellowships, Awards and Research Studies 185 

Films and Exhibits 194 

Symposia, Workshops, Lectures and Retreats 202 

Design-Competition Management and Guidelines 207 

Curriculum Development 210 

Resource Centers and Technical Assistance 213 

Computer Applications 218 



CHAPTER SIX: Presidential Design Awards 221 

Exemplary achievement in federal design in the 
fields of architecture, landscape architecture, 
interior design, urban design and planning, en- 
gineering design, graphic design and product 
design. 

1984 Presidential Design Awards 223 

1984 Federal Design Achievement Awards 224 

1988 Presidential Design Awards 229 

1988 Federal Design Achievement Awards 230 



INDEX: 

Index by Grantee 237 

Index by State 251 



Preface 



By Design 2 is, of course, a sequel to By Design, which was 
published in 1976 and describes 1,200 grants awarded by the 
Architecture + Environmental Arts Program from the pro- 
gram's beginnings in 1966 through 1976. The present volume, 
issued by the same program now renamed Design Arts, car- 
ries the record through 1987. It contains approximately 2,300 
grants and cooperative agreements, plus a final chapter de- 
scribing the 159 projects honored by Presidential Design 
Awards and Federal Achievement Awards in 1984 and 1988. 

Like its predecessor, this volume is based on information 
from the database maintained by the Livability Clearing- 
house, which is operated by Partners for Livable Places under 
a cooperative agreement with the Design Arts Program. The 
database contains information about the purpose of each 
grant, in addition to the name and address of the grantee at 
the time of the award, the fiscal year in which the grant was 
awarded and the amount of the award. When a grantee sub- 
mits a final report at the end of the grant period, the database 
also records the type of materials filed. The clearinghouse 
maintains a library of these final report materials — books, 
reports, pamphlets, journals, films, videos, slides — which are 
available to the public by appointment. 

Drawing on this material, this book follows each grant from 
the initial award through the final report. It does not attempt 
to follow the long-term results of grants. Design Arts grants 
are intended primarily as catalysts; typically, they fund feasi- 
bility studies, research and analysis, and design proposals. 
Some grants have been part of a process that resulted in major 
changes — cultural centers built or adapted from unused 
schools, historic buildings preserved, guidelines for new devel- 
opment written, waterfront parks created — but those results 
are beyond the scope of this book. 



A brief word about the book's organization: The grants 
described here fall into four main categories — design as it 
affects the individual, the arts, the community and the envi- 
ronment. This underscores a central fact about design — that 
it is all-pervasive, affecting everyone's daily life from the 
products he chooses to his community, its cultural environ- 
ment and its natural environment. Another chapter is devoted 
to the advancement of design knowledge — from seminars and 
workshops to films and books. The final chapter recognizes 
the outstanding design achievements in the federal sector. It 
describes the accomplishments of the 159 winners of Presi- 
dential Design Awards and Federal Design Achievement 
Awards. For easy reference, the reader will find all grants, 
cooperative agreements, and awards indexed both by grantee 
and by state. 

We hope that this book will be a useful addition to the 
library of design reference works and will stimulate new 
thinking and new projects to advance design excellence. 



Marcia Sartwell 
Editor-in-Chief 



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Introduction 




The interior of the Old Post 
Office in Washington. D.C., is 
a lively place during lunch 
hours, which feature live enter- 
tainment. Slated for demo- 
lition, the building was saved 
by preservation groups. 



"Old buildings are like old friends; they assure us in times of 
change," said Nancy Hanks in her testimony to the United 
States Senate in 1975. "The National Endowment for the 
Arts can encourage people to dream about their cities — to 
think before they build, to consider the alternative before they 
tear down. No building could give greater visibility to the 
Endowment's goals than the Old Post Office." 

The building that embodied the Endowment's goals — the 
Old Post Office — had been on the brink of demolition for 
decades. Critics called the nine-story granite structure a mis- 
fit. Begun in 1892 as one of Washington's few buildings in the 
Romanesque Revival style, it was completed in 1899, just as 
the architectural fashion was changing from the romantic to 
the neo-Classical style. In addition, building techniques using 
steel had made the building's solid masonry construction ap- 
pear outmoded. Although the Old Post Office was the first 
building erected on Federal Triangle — an area of government 
office buildings between the White House and the Capitol — it 
was soon surrounded by buildings in the neo-Classical, or 
Federal style. The public thought the building outmoded and 
an eyesore. 

When the postal service moved out of the building in 1934, 
the outcry to tear down the building intensified. But America 
was coping with the Depression, and then with a war. The 
building survived until 1961 when President John F. Kennedy 
looked at the blighted buildings on Pennsylvania Avenue and 
determined to revitalize the area. He appointed the Pennsyl- 
vania Avenue Commission to plan the area's redevelopment. 
The commission's plan recommended that the Old Post Of- 
fice be demolished. 

"The Old Post Office was there first!" protested architec- 
tural critic Wolf Von Eckardt in his Washington Post column 
in 1970. Nancy Hanks, then chairman of the National En- 
dowment for the Arts, also took up the fight to preserve the 
building, using her considerable persuasive skills. By the sev- 
enties civic groups and private citizens were becoming aware 
of the need to stop tearing down historic buildings. "Every 
time 1 returned to Washington from a trip, I found another 
piece of the city gone," said Alison Owings, who rallied sup- 
porters to the cause of saving the doomed building. "Don't 
tear it down," was the group's slogan and eventually its name. 
The group worked closely with Nancy Hanks to raise public 
awareness in favor of preserving the Old Post Office, and the 
tide began to turn. 

In 1971 President Nixon issued an Executive Order direct- 
ing federal agencies to adopt a role of stewardship in preserv- 




Tourists explore the interior of 
the Old Post Office, which was 
built in 1899. The renovated 
building houses restaurants 
and shops on the lower levels 
and government offices on the 
top six floors. 



ing historic sites, structures and objects for future genera- 
tions. The city council, congressional committees and the 
President's Advisory Council on Historic Preservation called 
for retaining the Old Post Office. The Pennsylvania Avenue 
plan was changed, first to preserve just the tower and then to 
preserve the whole building. On April 1, 1974, a bill was 
introduced in the House to make the Old Post Office building 
a permanent home for the National Endowment for the Arts 
and to renovate the building as a focal point for the revitaliza- 
tion of Pennsylvania Avenue. 

In 1976 Congress passed the Cooperative Use Act, which 
made it possible to bring cultural events and commercial 
enterprises into government buildings. This meant that the 
way was now clear not only for renovating the building but for 
adapting it for mixed use — part government, part private 
enterprise, part educational and recreational. The new Old 
Post Office was the first public-private venture of its kind, and 
its success pointed the way for similar projects across the 
nation. 



Today, in addition to the Arts Endowment, the building 
houses the National Endowment for the Humanities, the In- 
stitute for Museum Services, the President's Committee on 
the Arts and Humanities and the Advisory Council on His- 
toric Preservation. It also houses boutiques, restaurants and 
open spaces where crowds gather to eat their lunches and 
enjoy the performing arts groups that entertain them. Nancy 
Hanks did not live to see her vision of the Old Post Office 
become reality, but in 1983, in recognition of her work, an Act 
of Congress designated the building the Nancy Hanks Center. 

Architectural critic William Marlin caught the central im- 
portance of what was accomplished when he wrote, "The 
adaptive use of architecturally or historically significant 
buildings is a matter of making the most of what America 
already has — a matter of conserving energy and materials, 
yes; but more, a matter of conserving the identity of a people 
and their community." 

Of all the design projects that took place through the En- 
dowment's Design Arts Program, none matches the symbolic 
importance of the resurrection of the Old Post Office as a 
home for federal cultural agencies and as a center of cultural 
and commercial activities that bring new life to the area. 
Communities facing the challenge of revitalizing their inner 
cities or town centers can draw inspiration from the example 
of the Nancy Hanks Center. 

The evidence is that many communities have done just 
that. Even a cursory reading of the grants on the following 
pages reveals that as a nation we are learning, in Nancy 
Hanks's words, "to consider the alternative before [we] tear 
down." Scores of grants have gone for adaptive reuse — the 
most popular alternative to tearing down — and many worthy 
buildings have found new life as performing arts centers, 
galleries, hotels, boutiques, libraries, classrooms, restaurants. 

The volume, the second in a series documenting Design 
Arts grants, lists more than 2,300 grants awarded from 1977 
through 1987. In the first volume, listing grants from 1966 
through 1976, Nancy Hanks cautioned, "We must recognize 
that funding for the kinds of projects described in this book 
will remain limited. Facing this, we must develop a strategy to 
build upon and stretch available resources as far as they can 
go — to stimulate broad-based support from government, busi- 
ness and other sectors. ... If this funding, in turn, can spark 
energy, enthusiasm and support from others — to make imagi- 
native concepts grow and flourish — it is a large measure of 
success." 

The impact these 2,300 grants have had on America's de- 
signed environment is formidable. Scores of books have been 
written and published — biographies and autobiographies, 
guidebooks and textbooks. Design Arts grants have been vital 
in initiating exhibitions, conferences and workshops across the 
nation — dealing with product design, landscape architecture 
and urban design. Educational grants have made a gradual, 
but significant, change in national attitudes and thinking 
about design. In the last ten years. Endowment grants have 
helped seven states begin their own design arts programs, 
helping to franchise support for design excellence to the local 
level. 

Credit for the success of the Design Arts Program must go 
to the thousands of people found in this book. Their dedication 
to thoughtful, refined and imaginative design — in all its 
forms — comes from their passionate belief that a more beauti- 



ful, more considerate designed environment makes America a 
better place in which to live and work. "They came to us with 
ideas," said Nancy Hanks, "about something or some way to 
make our built environment more livable, and they suc- 
ceeded — more often than not." 

We also cannot ignore the energy, concentration and time 
hundreds of panelists have invested in studying and analyzing 
the 8,000 grants the program reviewed during the period 
covered in this volume. The fairness and open-mindedness of 
our panels and their fidelity to quality make the Endowment's 
peer review system a process to cherish and preserve. In the 
world of design, there is no other program as rigorous and as 
fair. 

When people do good work, somewhere there is a fine 
leader. And there has been a succession of fine leaders in the 
Design Arts Program during the period covered by this sum- 
mary: Bill Lacy (1970-1977), Michael Pittas (1978-1983), 
Charles Zucker (1983-1984) and Adele Chatfield-Taylor 
(1984-1988). They, along with Design Arts stalTers, encour- 
aged grantees in their work, ignited important new initiatives 
like the Presidential Design Awards and the Mayors Institute 
for City Design and led the design community through their 
enthusiasm and energy. 

America has a great resource in its growing community of 
designers, dedicated professionals with the creativity, wit and 
skill to help us all. The National Endowment for the Arts, 
through the Design Arts Program, will sustain its partnership 
with the thousands of architects and designers across the 
nation whose job it is to improve and preserve the nation's 
built environment — to make America's cities, towns and 
countryside better places to live. 



Randolph M.N. McAusland 
August 1989 




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1 



Design for 
Communities 



Pershing Park in Washington, 
D.C., invites passersby to enjoy 
a view of water and greenery. 
The park is a popular feature 
of the Pennsylvania Avenue 
Plan, which revitalized sixteen 
blocks of "America's Main 
Street" and won a Presidential 
Design Award in 1988. 



"What is a city but the people?" asks one of the Roman 
tribunes in Shakespeare's Coriolanus. That remark aptly 
sums up the philosophy behind the Design Arts Program's 
support of projects benefiting our cities and communities. 
Since 1966 when the Program was established (as Architec- 
ture + Environmental Arts), it has stimulated ideas and 
projects that make our cities not just more beautiful but more 
humane and livable. This chapter contains more than 600 
grants awarded by the Design Arts Program from 1977 
through 1987. However varied in method, their common pur- 
pose is to improve the public realm, to help make cities, towns, 
and neighborhoods places that provide a sense of community 
identity and inspire civic pride. 

In the sixties and seventies, programs such as City Scale, 
City Options, and City Edges focused attention on specific 
urban issues: preserving historic architecture, adapting build- 
ings for re-use, designing better transportation systems, con- 
trolling downtown development, improving gateways to cities. 
In the eighties, the more comprehensive Design of Cities 
theme underscored the importance of looking at the public 
realm not as a place where separate pockets of beauty might 
be created but as a unity where all the elements must work 
together. Also in the eighties, the Mayors' Institute for City 
Design brought mayors and designers together in intensive 
seminars aimed at developing awareness of design issues at 
the highest level of city government. 

Because Design Arts grants are intended as catalysts, they 
tend to fund ideas and beginnings — studies for zoning 
changes, guidelines for new development, surveys of a town's 
historic structures, feasibility studies for re-use of vacant in- 
dustrial buildings, plans for design competitions. Many grants 
also aim at raising citizens' awareness of good design. It is not 
possible to know how many changes were set in motion by the 
ideas generated here. We will never know, for example, how 
many communities made sensible choices about their future 
as a result of assistance from one of the community design 
centers that have been established in dozens of cities; or from 
the Regional/Urban Design Assistance Teams sent to various 
communities by the American Institute of Architects; or from 
Pride in Place, which offered technical assistance in design to 
small towns in North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennes- 
see. We will never know how many homeowners restored older 



CHAPTER ONE 





Rowhouses on Bolton Street 
were restored in 1 975 by the 
Savannah Landmark Rehabili- 
tation Project. More than 400 
homes have been restored, and 
a deteriorating neighborhood 
turned into a showplace. 



properties as a result of workshops, how many buildings were 
preserved as a result of citizens becoming aware of their 
architectural heritage or how many legislators were made 
aware of the need for better urban design. 

Many grants, of course, have had tangible, wonderful re- 
sults. To name a few: A survey documenting adobe churches 
in New Mexico led to preservation work on many of them. 
The Stoneyard Institute at the Cathedral of St. John the 
Divine in New York City trained neighborhood residents in 
the almost-forgotten crafts of stone-cutting and stone-carving, 
and these craftsmen are completing the unfinished towers of 
the great cathedral. In Washington, D.C., the newly estab- 
lished National Building Museum has become the country's 
first museum dedicated to exhibiting the materials, skills and 
crafts of the building industry — the tools of the architects and 
builders who shaped the country's built environment. In Mil- 
waukee an abandoned freeway has been converted to recre- 
ational space. In West Virginia design assistance is helping six 
small towns devastated by a 1985 flood preserve their historic 
character as they rebuild. 

Some grants have not only improved their communities but 
have done so in ways that provide the rest of the nation with 
models. The Savannah Landmarks Rehabilitation Project, for 
example, acquired more than 400 housing units in a run-down 
Victorian neighborhood and restored them with painstaking 
attention to historic detail. The buildings became rental units 
for the residents, largely poor and black, who already lived 
there. The program off'ers lessons not only in urban design and 
historic preservation but in how to create a healthy, diverse 
neighborhood without displacing the poor who call it home. 

The Main Street Project, started in 1976 by the National 
Trust for Historic Preservation, has also pioneered in tech- 
niques to revitalize communities. Based on the idea that the 
physical enhancement of older downtown business districts 
was the key to their economic recovery, the project provided 
economic and design consultants to work with local business 
people and community leaders. Buildings have been rehabili- 
tated, exteriors restored, graphics updated, business tech- 
niques improved and civic spirits raised. To help other com- 
munities with similar projects, the process was documented in 
films and publications. 

Community involvement was essential in the success of the 
Main Street Project, as it is for many, if not most, of the 
grants listed here. For if there is a common purpose for these 
grants — to improve the public realm for the benefit of the 
people — so is there a common approach to that goal. That 
approach is education — raising the awareness of citizens to 
the benefits of good design; for in the long run, the art of city 
design will be only as good as its citizens demand. 



DESIGN FOR COMMUNITIES 3 



Revitalization 

Main street programs for small towns and villages, commer- 
cial revitalization projects, urban neighborhood rehabilitation 
and infill housing design. 



Architects' Community 

Center 

FY 1981 

$31,040 

12-4250-192 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Architects' Community 

Center, 380 Main Street, 

East Orange, NJ 07018 



Area XV Regional Planning 

Commission 

FY 1978 

$20,000 

R80-42-9.7 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Area XV Regional Planning 

Commission, Ottumwa 

Industrial Airport, 

Ottumwa, lA 52501 



Arts and Humanities 
Council of the Lake Region 
FY 1978 
$10,000 
R80-42-165 
Contact: Arts and 
Humanities Council of the 
Lake Region, Box 1034, 
Devil's Lake, ND 58301 



Arts and Humanities 

Council of the Lake Region 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

92-4233-186 

Contact: RO. Box 1034, 

Devil's Lake, ND 58301 



Bangor Symphony 

Orchestra 

FY 1979 

$30,000 

92-4233-187 

Contact: President, Bangor 

Symphony Orchestra, PO. 

Box 1441, Bangor, ME 

04407 



To develop a series of seminars and a 
manual for low-income public-housing 
tenants in Newark, New Jersey. The 
aims were to develop an awareness of the 
effects of good design and instruct resi- 
dents in how to use funding from the De- 
partment of Housing and Urban Devel- 
opment (H.U.D.) to rehabilitate their 
buildings. 



To assist in the redesign of four small 
towns along the Des Moines River. The 
project included surveys of historic build- 
ings and open space areas and design of 
a waterfront recreational system. 



For planning and design assistance for 
redevelopment of the central business 
district in Devil's Lake, North Dakota. 
The project included rehabilitation of 
two historic buildings and creation of two 
wall murals. 



For technical assistance in urban design 
for the central business district in Devil's 
Lake, North Dakota. 



To provide design expertise for the re- 
vitalization of downtown Bangor, Maine. 



Buffalo Neighborhood 

Housing Services, Inc. 

FY 1978 

$15,000 

R 80-42-98 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Buffalo Neighborhood 

Housing Services, Inc., 979 

Kensington Avenue, 

Buffalo, NY 14215 



Cheyenne Downtown 

Development Authority 

FY 1987 

$11,000 

87-4251-0022 

Contact: Chairman of the 

Board, Cheyenne Downtown 

Development Authority, 

PO. Box 1674, Cheyenne, 

WY 82003 



City of Aurora 

FY 1981 

$15,000 

12-4230-012 

Contact: Senior Planner, 

City of Aurora, 1470 South 

Havana, Aurora, CO 80012 



City of Baltimore 

FY 1977 

$7,995 

R70-42-129 

Contact: Executive Director, 

City of Baltimore, 

Baltimore, MD 21202 



City of Birmingham 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

92-4233-061 

Contact: Project Director, 

210 North 19th Street, 

Birmingham, AL 35203 



City of Cleveland, 

Tennessee 

FY 1978 

$6,200 

R 80-42- 160 

Contact: City of Cleveland, 

190 Church Street, 

Cleveland, TN 37311 



City of Easlport 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R8()-42-161 

Contact: Townscapc 

As.socialcs, City of F.astporl, 

Eastport, ME 04631 



To establish a storefront office to admin- 
ister technical assistance for the revital- 
ization of Bailey Avenue in Buffalo, New 
York. 



To stimulate public awareness of design 
excellence and historic architectural re- 
sources in Cheyenne, Wyoming, through 
a program of education and awards. 



To redevelop Colfax Avenue, the original 
main street of Aurora, Colorado. Design 
guidelines for renovation, an urban de- 
sign plan and a feasibility study were 
produced. 



For a redevelopment study of Baltimore's 
warehouse district, including a building 
catalogue and economic and architec- 
tural feasibility studies. 



To develop an environmental design plan 
that incorporates elements of various art 
forms into the revitalization of the Mor- 
ris Avenue historic district in downtown 
Birmingham, Alabama. A report outlin- 
ing the environmental design plan was is- 
sued. 



To plan facade and landscaping improve- 
ments as part of the downtown revitaliza- 
tion program in Cleveland, Tennessee. 



To formulate plans for the revitalization 
of Eastport 's historic downtown/water- 
front. The project included analysis of 
waterfront systems and buildings, plan- 
ning and design studies and an action 
plan for implementation. 



4 CHAPTER ONE 



City of Greenville 

FY 1978 

SI 0.000 

R8(M2-I0I 

Contact: City of Greenville, 

Chamber of Commerce, 

PO. Box 2207, Greenville, 

SC 29601 



City of Knoxville 

FY 1978 

$20,000 

R80-42-46 

Contact: Principal Planner, 

City of Knoxville, 

Metropolitan Planning 

Commission, City Hall 

Park. Knoxville, TN 37902 



City of Lewiston 

FY 1977 

$20,000 

R7(M2-8B 

Contact: Housing 

Coordinator. City of 

Lewiston. Department of 

Planning and Community 

Development, City Building. 

Lewiston. ME 04240 



City of Manitou Springs 

FY 1978 

$17,600 

R8(M2-39 

Contact: Community 

Development Consultant, 

City of Manitou Springs. 

Manitou Springs. CO 80829 



City of Marysville 

FY 1978 

$7,500 

R8042^0 

Contact: City Manager, 

City of Marysville, Sixth 

and Main Streets, 

Marysville. OH 43040 



City of Norwalk 

FY 1981 

$15,000 

12-4230-076 

Contact: Executive Director. 

Redevelopment Agency. 

City of Norwalk. City Hall. 

41 North Main Street. 

Norwalk. CT 06854 



To implement a streetfront design 
project for more than eighty buildings in 
the central business district of Green- 
ville, South Carolina. The process in- 
volved collaboration between an architect 
and local merchants. A sixty-page build- 
ing survey was produced. 



For a study of the Market Street area in 
Knoxville, Tennessee. The aim was to 
identify the potential for urban living. A 
revitalization report documented the 
study. 



For the Cityscale project, a program of 
revitalization for Lewiston's central busi- 
ness district and three downtown neigh- 
borhoods. The program included analysis 
of streetscapes and the Grand Canal sys- 
tem and development of a demonstration 
project for public spaces. A series of re- 
ports was issued. 



To develop a comprehensive community 
identity program for Manitou Springs, 
Colorado, in order to initiate a long- 
range economic revitalization program. 
A design plan resulted from the project. 



For the Marysville downtown blockfront/ 
streetscape program. The aims were to 
establish a community identity program 
and to demonstrate the economic value 
of the imaginative reuse of existing struc- 
tures. The project was documented in a 
report and slides. 



To plan the conversion of a former iron 
foundry into a maritime cultural center. 
The museum site is located on the 
harborfront in South Norwalk, a Na- 
tional Register historic district. 



City of Pasadena 

FY 1977 

$50,000 

R7(M2-11B 

Contact: Assistant City 

Manager, City of Pasadena, 

City Hall, Pasadena, CA 

91109 



City of Reading 

FY 1979 

$22,940 

92-4233-191 

Contact: Director of 

Planning, City Hall, Eighth 

and Washington Streets, 

Reading, PA 19601 



City of Riverside 

FY 1985 

$30,000 

52-4213-0030 

Contact: Mayor, City of 

Riverside, 3900 Main 

Street, Riverside, CA 92522 



City of Seattle 

FY 1987 

$30,000 

87-4251-0097 

Contact: Mayor, City of 

Seattle, Department of 

Community Development. 

400 Yealer Building. Third 

Floor. Seattle. WA 98104 



City of Springfield 

FY 1979 

$20,000 

92-4233-181 

Contact: Project Director, 

City Hall. Springfield. MA 

01103 



City of Troy 

FY 1979 

$18,000 

92-4233-123 

Contact: City of Troy, City 

Hall, Bureau of Planning, 

Troy, NY 12180 



City of Wilmington 

FY 1978 

$15,000 

R80-42-41 

Contact: Director, Division 

of Planning, City of 

Wilmington, Wilmington, 

DE 19801 



To design and implement improvements 
in downtown Pasadena, California. The 
aim was to integrate the city's main ele- 
ments through environmental ameni- 
ties — street lighting, signs, plantings and 
street furniture. A city plan, design 
guidelines and design manual were pro- 
duced. 



To develop prototypical designs for the 
improvement of private outdoor space in 
densely developed neighborhoods. A re- 
port entitled Livable Yards resulted. 



To develop a restoration plan for the 
municipal auditorium in Riverside, Cali- 
fornia. The auditorium was designed by 
Arthur B. Benton in the late 1920s. 



To hold a national design competition to 
create model affordable housing for 
downtown Seattle and the Denny Re- 
grade, the city's largest downtown resi- 
dential neighborhood. 



To develop a master plan for the rede- 
sign and revitalization of Springfield's 
four-mile frontage on the Connecticut 
River. 



For a revitalization program for down- 
town Troy, New York, that takes advan- 
tage of the city's industrial and architec- 
tural heritage and its Hudson riverfront. 
Three reports were produced, including a 
survey of building conditions and an 
analysis of redevelopment potential. 



To research and formulate a design plan 
to create a complementary and produc- 
tive environment in the vicinity of Wil- 
mington's historic railroad station. A re- 
use study was issued. 



DESIGN FOR COMMUNITIES 



City of Yonkers 

FY 1978 

$15,000 

R80-42-42 

Contact: 35 Mercer Street, 

New York, NY 10701 



Downtown Chico Business 

Association 

FY 1987 

$15,000 

87-4251-0128 

Contact: Director, 

Downtown Chico Business 

Association, 131 Main 

Street, PO. Box 3670, 

Chico, CA 95927 



Elmhurst Community 

Design Center 

FY 1981 

$15,000 

12-4230-059 

Contact: Elmhurst 

Community Design Center, 

232 Wurster Hall, College 

of Environmental Design, 

Berkeley, CA 94720 



Georgia Trust for Historic 

Preservation 

FY 1982 

$25,000 

22-4230-220 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Georgia Trust for Historic 

Preservation, 1 1 Baltimore 

Place, N.W., Atlanta, GA 

30308 



Hartford Architecture 

Conservancy 

FY 1978 

$12,000 

R80-42-164 

Contact: Director, Hartford 

Architecture Conservancy, 

130 Washington Street, 

Hartford, CT 06106 



Historic Albany Foundation, 

Inc. 

FY 1979 

$7,800 

92^233-184 

Contact: Director, Historic 

Albany Foundation, Inc., 

300 Hudson Avenue, 

Albany, NY 12210 



To improve the neighborhood shopping 
areas in Yonkers, New York, with the 
goal of maintaining each area's distinc- 
tive character. The project involved a de- 
sign team and neighborhood revitaliza- 
tion committees composed of retailers, 
building owners, banks and shoppers. 



To formulate a long-range urban revital- 
ization plan for downtown Chico, Cali- 
fornia, including beautification of public 
areas and improvements by property 
owners and merchants. 



To create a calendar that presents in- 
formation on energy conservation and ba- 
sic home improvements for self-help 
builders and provides references for more 
detailed information. A calendar for 
1980-81 was produced. 



To hire a consulting architect to furnish 
preservation design and technical assis- 
tance to projects throughout Georgia. 
The architect traveled to nine Georgia 
towns in coordination with the Main 
Street project. 



To provide design services for home im- 
provement, commercial revitalization and 
infill housing for Frog Hollow, a cultur- 
ally diverse neighborhood in Hartford, 
Connecticut. A project overview, entitled 
Downtown H an ford: Managing for 
Change, and three reports were issued. 



To conduct a design competition for 
infill housing within a Victorian neigh- 
borhood adjacent to the Empire State 
Plaza. A report on the competition was 
issued. 



Historic Preservation 

Alliance of Arkansas 

FY 1986 

$36,400 

86-4231-0136 

Contact: President, Historic 

Preservation Alliance of 

Arkansas, PO. Box 305, 

Little Rock, AR 72203 



Historic Savannah 

Foundation, Inc. 

FY 1980 

$8,000 

02-4230-091 

Contact: Assistant Director, 

Historic Savannah 

Foundation, Inc., PO. Box 

1733, Savannah, G A 31402 



Historic Staunton 

Foundation, Inc. 

FY 1981 

$12,500 

12-4230-065 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Historic Staunton 

Foundation, Inc., PO. Box 

2534, Staunton, VA 24401 



Historic Walker's Point, 

Inc. 

FY 1978 

$20,000 

R80-42-45 

Contact: Director, Historic 

Walker's Point, Inc., 414 

West National Avenue, 

Milwaukee, Wl 53204 



To provide interdisciplinary design assis- 
tance for the revitalization of the down- 
town commercial centers in three Arkan- 
sas cities: Benton, Arkadelphia and Hot 
Springs. 



To conduct the Historic Savannah Foun- 
dation Residential Design Competition, 
an event open to all registered architects. 
Through it, guidelines for infill construc- 
tion on vacant sites in Savannah's Vic- 
torian district were developed. 



For a downtown revitalization program 
entitled Streetscape — A Search for Ap- 
propriateness. The program included an 
in-depth historical study and analysis of 
downtown Staunton, Virginia. Work- 
shops with residents were held and a 
100-page report was issued. 



To draft a comprehensive revitalization 
program for Walker's Point, a culturally 
diverse, nineteenth-century neighborhood 
on Milwaukee's southeast side. The ma- 
jor goal was to reintroduce commercial 
services through physical and social re- 
habilitation of the main business area. 




Storefronts in East on, Pennsylvania, benefited from the Main 
Street Program of the National Trust for Historic Preserx'ation. 
which helped small towns revitalize their business districts. 



6 CHAPTER ONE 



Housing Action Council. 

Inc. 

FY 1977 

$15,690 

R70-42-135 

Contact: Deputy Director. 

Housing Action Council. 

Inc.. 33 Church Street. 

White Plains, NY 10601 



Maryland Art Place 

FY 1986 

$8,000 

86-4231-0004 

Contact: Director. Maryland 

Art Place, 218 West 

Saratoga Street, Baltimore, 

MD 21201 



Matthias, Stephen 

FY 1977 

$5,700 

R7M2-6N 

Contact: 3924 Cloverhill 

Road. Baltimore, MD 21218 



Merriam Park 

Neighborhood Housing 

Services, Inc. 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R7(>42-I89 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Merriam Park 

Neighborhood Housing 

Services, Inc., 1589 Selby 

Avenue, St. Paul, MN 

55104 



Mississippi State University 

FY 1984 

$15,000 

42^252-0106 

Contact: Vice-President, 

Graduate Studies and 

Research, PO. Drawer G, 

Mississippi State. MS 

39762 



Montana Arts Council 

FY 1980 

$30,000 

02^230-096 

Contact: Chairman, City 

Spirits Facility Committee, 

Montana Arts Council, 

Missoula, MT 59801 



To prepare design proposals for the 
adaptive reuse of five prototype proper- 
ties in Westchester County, New York. 
Two reports documented the project and 
included preliminary drawings, cost 
analyses, code reviews and financing rec- 
ommendations. 



To hire a landscape architect and an art- 
ist to collaborate on the streetscape de- 
sign of part of the loft district in Balti- 
more. 



To prepare a guidebook on the renova- 
tion of older, single-family residences for 
use by moderate-income families. A re- 
port entitled The Dreamhouse Doctor 
was the result. 



To devise a rehabilitation plan for the 
Snelling-Selby Avenue district, a twenty- 
four-block area of St. Paul, Minnesota. 
The Community Design Center of Min- 
nesota helped implement the project, 
which was documented in a report. 



To study the significance of in-town, 
quality housing for three Mississippi 
towns. The study developed terms spe- 
cifically for small towns rather than rely- 
ing on scaled-down versions of concepts 
created for large cities. A report. Eco- 
nomic Images: Downtown and Housing, 
was produced. 



For the Missoula Riverfront/ Downtown 
development project. In this phase of the 
project, a Regional/Urban Design Assis- 
tance Team visited Missoula, a public fo- 
rum was held, and a professional advisor 
was hired to assist with a design compe- 
tition. A $4,000 amendment, grant num- 
ber 12-4230-9016.1, was made in 1981. 



Municipal Art Society 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R70-42-136 

Contact: Vice-President. 

Municipal Art Society. 30 

Rockefeller Plaza. New 

York. NY 10021 



National Association of 

Housing and 

Redevelopment Officials 

(NAHRO) 

FY 1984 

$30,000 

42^257-0071 

Contact: Executive Director, 

NAHRO, 2600 Virginia 

Avenue, N.W.. Suite 404, 

Washington, DC 20037 



National Congress of 
Neighborhood Women 
FY 1984 
$15,000 
42^231-0034 
Contact: Codlrector, 
National Congress of 
Neighborhood Women, 249 
Manhattan Avenue, 
Brooklyn, NY 11211 



National League of Cities 

FY 1980 

$11,000 

02-4250-104 

Contact: National League of 

Cities, 1620 I Street, N.W, 

Washington, DC 20006 



To develop creative alternatives to elimi- 
nate visual blight at key sites in New 
York City. The effort was part of the 
Visible Streets project. 



National Trust for Historic 

Preservation 

FY 1977 

$20,000 

R7a42-37 

Contact: Regional Director, 

National Trust for Historic 

Preservation, 1 785 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

N.W., Washington. DC 

20036 



National Trust for Historic 

Preservation 

FY 1978 

$26,425 

R80-42-27 

Contact: National Trust for 

Historic Preservation, 1785 

Massachusetts Ave, N.W., 

Washington. DC 20036 



To conduct a national student design 
competition on the revitalization of large- 
scale postwar housing developments. A 
report. Revitalizing Older Rental Hous- 
ing: An Exercise in Social Reality, 
documented the project. 



For a program entitled Architectural 
Quality in Urban Homesteading. The 
aim was to demonstrate that well-de- 
signed and affordable housing can be 
created and maintained when homestead- 
ers are fully involved in the design, 
development and construction of their fu- 
ture housing. 



To conduct a national symposium, jointly 
sponsored by H.U.D., as the culmination 
of the National League of Cities' urban 
environmental design project. Ten issues 
of the Bulletins in Managing Design and 
Development were produced. An $1 1,500 
amendment, grant number 02-4250- 
104.1, was made in 1980, carried for- 
ward to 1981 through grant number 12- 
4250-9011. 



To develop and monitor demonstration 
projects in three competitively selected 
towns as the first phase of the Main 
Street program, which assists small mid- 
western towns in renewal and restoration 
of their central business districts. A re- 
port on the project and conference pro- 
ceedings were issued. 



For phase two of the National Trust's 
Main Street Project. The effort included 
publication of a practical handbook for 
conservation of central business districts. 



DESIGN FOR COMMUNITIES 7 



National Trust for Historic 

Preservation 

FY 1980 

$50,000 

CA 80-26 

Contact: President, National 

Trust for Historic 

Preservation, 1785 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20036 



National Trust for Historic 

Preservation 

FY 1981 

$15,000 

12-4250032 

Contact: Director, Special 

Projects, National Trust for 

Historic Preservation, Inc., 

1785 Massachusetts 

Avenue, N.W., Washington, 

DC 20036 



National Trust for Historic 

Preservation 

FY 1983 

$250,000 

DCA 83-24 

Contact: Director, Main 

Street Project, National 

Trust for Historic 

Preservation, 1785 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20036 



National Trust for Historic 

Preservation 

FY 1984 

$50,000 

42-4255-0053 

Contact: Vice-President, 

National Trust for Historic 

Preservation, 1785 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

N.W, Washington, DC 

20036 



National Trust for Historic 

Preservation 

FY 1986 

$40,180 

86-4257-0062 

Contact: President, National 

Trust for Historic 

Preservation, 1785 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20036 



To establish a National Main Street 
Center in cooperation with the Interna- 
tional Downtown Executives Association. 
The aim was to provide design and plan- 
ning information and technical assistance 
for revitalizing main streets and commer- 
cial districts. 



To prepare a booklet and video on small 
town downtown awareness, entitled What 
Do People Do Downtown?, and a three- 
hour presentation on community design 
issues for small towns. The materials 
were developed for use in National Main 
Street Center training programs. 



To develop, produce and circulate an in- 
formation and video outreach training 
program. The aim was to inform rural 
leaders about viable design and preserva- 
tion strategies for rural downtown eco- 
nomic revitalization projects. The effort 
was a cooperative program of the Na- 
tional Trust, the Arts Endowment and 
the U.S. Department of Agriculture. 



To produce an update of the 1978 film 
Main Street. The Main Street program 
has assisted more than sixty towns across 
America in downtown revitalization. An 
audiovisual presentation and guidelines 
on signs, awnings and canopies for small 
town centers were produced. 



To produce two publications and two 
workshop-design competitions to encour- 
age the development of affordable manu- 
factured housing compatible with his- 
toric neighborhoods. 



Neighborhood Housing 
Services of Cleveland 
FY 1977 
$10,000 
R70-42-195 
Contact: 4415 Bridge 
Avenue, Cleveland, OH 
44223 



Neighborhood Housing 
Services of New Haven 
FY 1983 
$4,120 

32-4250-00115 
Contact: Neighborhood 
Housing Services of New 
Haven, 13 Edwards Street, 
New Haven, CT 



Newburgh Phoenix 

FY 1978 

$15,000 

R80-42-173 

Contact: Project Director, 

Historical Society of 

Newburgh Bay, 189 

Montgomery Street, 

Newburgh, NY 12550 



New York Foundation for 

the Arts 

FY 1987 

$20,000 

87-4251-0168 

Contact: Artist and New 

Works Program, New York 

Foundation for the Arts, 5 

Beekman Street, Suite 600, 

New York, NY 10038 



The "side-house" fits 
so well into its 
Charleston. South 
Carolina, setting that 
it does not resemble 
public housing, yet it 
is one of 1 13 public- 
housing units con- 
structed in five di- 
verse neighborhoods. 



To prepare a design manual for the 
vernacular residential architecture of the 
Buckeye woodland community in Cleve- 
land. The manual discusses home main- 
tenance and remodeling and includes a 
homeowner planning kit. 



To prepare a booklet documenting the 
restoration of a small 1866 frame house 
in New Haven. The booklet, entitled 308 
Orchard Street, illustrates the rehabilita- 
tion process in nontechnical terms. The 
project demonstrated the feasibility of in- 
corporating sensitive design concerns into 
the renewal of moderate-income neigh- 
borhoods. 



To frame plans for the revitalization of a 
pre-Revolutionary War urban center in a 
low-income community that includes wa- 
terfront, residential and commercial ar- 
eas. 



To produce a documentary film on the 
conversion of an abandoned eighty-six- 
year-old tenement building, Mascot 
Flats, into nineteen low-income cooper- 
ative apartments. The process was an ex- 
ample of urban homesteading that in- 
volved extensive community 
collaboration. 




8 CHAPTER ONE 



Nineteenih Ward 

Community Association 

FY 1977 

$8,700 

R7(M2-45 

Contact: Nineteenth Ward 

Community Association, 

541 Thurston Road. 

Rochester, NY 14619 



Old Town Restorations, Inc. 

FY 1977 

$20,000 

R7a42-I45 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Old Town Restorations, 

Inc., 158 Farrington Street, 

St. Paul, MN 55102 



To prepare an exhibit showcasing ideas 
for home improvements in an older, cul- 
turally diverse neighborhood in Roches- 
ter, New York. A booklet to guide re- 
habilitation was produced as well. 



Old Town Restorations, Inc. 

FY 1979 

$15,000 

92-4233-075 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Old Town Restorations, 

Inc., 158 Farrington Street, 

St. Paul, MN 55102 



Parks Council, Inc. 

FY 1983 

$13,500 

32^230-00193 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Parks Council. Inc., 457 

Madison Avenue, New 

York, NY 10022 



Preservation Alliance of 

Louisville and Jefferson 

County 

FY 1979 

$15,000 

92-4233-076 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Preservation Alliance of 

Louisville and Jefferson 

County, 712 West Main 

Street, Louisville, KY 

40202 



Richmond-on-the-James 
FY 1982 
$10,000 
22^230-119 
Contact: President, 
Richmond-on-the-James, 
1812 East Grace Street, 
Richmond. VA 23223 



To guide renovation and appropriate new 
development along Selby Avenue, a de- 
teriorating mixed-use area of St. Paul's 
historic Old Town. Two reports 
documented key buildings, assessed their 
physical condition and adaptive use po- 
tential and developed design guidelines 
for new residential and commercial 
development. 



To explore design options for construc- 
tion of moderate-income housing that is 
aesthetically pleasing and visually com- 
patible within existing contexts of older 
single-family houses. 



To design model street improvements 
and open space amenities along Third 
Avenue, a core commercial strip in the 
Bay Ridge Special Zoning District in 
Brooklyn. The planning process involved 
merchants, the state arts council, the 
parks council and the local planning of- 
fice. 



To encourage the preservation of Louis- 
ville's many "shotgun" neighborhoods 
through a demonstration program of in- 
centives, mechanisms and design guide- 
lines. A report entitled The Shotgun 
House was produced. 



To develop a long-term revitalization 
plan for the historic Shockoe Slip area, a 
twelve-block area of Richmond, Virginia, 
listed on the National Register of His- 
toric Places. Design guidelines were 
given in a forty-page report. 



San Francisco Development 

Fund 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R70-42-193C 

Contact: Administrator, San 

Francisco Development 

Fund, 315 Granada Avenue, 

San Francisco, CA 941 12 



San Francisco Foundation 

FY 1985 

$30,000 

52-4231-0003 

Contact: Chairman of the 

Board, San Francisco 

Foundation, 3841 Clement 

Street, San Francisco, CA 

94121 



Savannah Landmarks 
Rehabilitation Project, Inc. 
FY 1977 
$18,000 
R7(>42-42 
Contact: Savannah 
Landmarks Rehabilitation 
Project, Inc., RO. Box 
8801, Savannah, GA 31402 



Savannah Landmarks 
Rehabilitation Project, Inc. 
FY 1978 
$20,000 
R80-42-53 
Contact: Savannah 
Landmarks Rehabilitation 
Project, Inc., PO. Box 
8801, Savannah, GA 31402 



Savannah Landmarks 
Rehabilitation Project, Inc. 
FY 1987 
$30,000 
87-4251-0098 
Contact: President, 
Savannah Landmarks 
Rehabilitation Project, Inc., 
PO. Box 8801, Savannah, 
GA 31412 



South Main Center 

Association 

FY 1979 

$17,315 

92-4212-051 

Contact: Executive Director, 

South Main Center 

Association, 1020 

Holcombe, Suite 1604, 

Houston, TX 77030 



To upgrade Ocean Avenue, a deteriorat- 
ing ten-block neighborhood shopping 
area of San Francisco. Through coopera- 
tion of design professionals and local 
merchants, architectural and design 
guidelines for improvements to store- 
fronts and street graphics were devised. 



To design an affordable housing project 
patterned after the early design of San 
Francisco's city-block configurations and 
characterized by small detail: decorative 
lamp posts, bay window exteriors and 
front stoops. 



To continue a program of neighborhood 
rehabilitation in which historic Victorian 
houses are remodeled and renovated for 
their low-income residents. 



For Savannah Landmarks' program for 
historic inner-city neighborhoods. The 
program provided design services for ren- 
ovating units for low-income residents 
and developed site plans for neighbor- 
hood improvements. 



To design and rehabilitate buildings in 
two historic districts in Savannah to pro- 
vide affordable housing for persons of 
low to moderate income. 



For a study of neighborhood displace- 
ment and land use changes in the historic 
Old Sixth Ward of Houston, Texas. A 
study was issued, and guidelines on hous- 
ing development and restoration for resi- 
dents were made available through de- 
sign workshops and newsletters. 



DESIGN FOR COMMUNITIES 9 



Southeast Development, 

Inc. 

FY 1977 

$12,000 

R70-42-153 

Conlacl: Director of Project 

Development, Southeast 

Development, Inc., 10 

South Wolfe Street, 

Baltimore, MD 21231 



Saint Nicholas 

Neighborhood Preservation 

and Housing Rehabilitation 

Corporation 

FY 1978 

$23,000 

R80^2-110 

Conlacl: Saint Nicholas 

Neighborhood Preservation 

and Housing Rehabilitation 

Corporation, 1 1-29 

Catherine Street, Brooklyn, 

NY 11211 



St. Nicholas Neighborhood 

Preservation and Housing 

Rehabilitation Corporation 

(NPHRC) 

FY 1980 

$10,460 

02-4254-053 

Conlacl: Chairman, St. 

Nicholas NPHRC, 11-29 

Catherine Street, Brooklyn, 

NY 11211 



State of Maryland 

FY 1979 

$15,000 

92-4233-078 

Conlacl: Project Planner, 

State Capitol, Annapolis, 

MD 21401 



Tampa Community Design 

Center 

FY 1979 

$7,525 

92-4233-126 

Conlacl: Vice-President, 

Tampa Community Design 

Center, 304 Plant Avenue, 

Tampa, FL 33606 



Texas Historical 

Commission 

FY 1982 

$28,000 

22-4230-213 

Conlacl: Acting Executive 

Director, Texas Historical 

Commission, PO. Box 

12276, Austin, TX 78711 



To develop new uses for vacant space in 
small commercial buildings in the 
Highlandtown and Greater Fells Point 
areas of Baltimore, Maryland. A study 
on commercial revitalization opportuni- 
ties, including code reviews and feasibil- 
ity assessments, was issued. 



To study the possibilities of converting 
underutilized industrial buildings into co- 
operative apartments for working-class 
residents of Brooklyn. The aims were to 
increase the housing stock while stimu- 
lating a cooperative housing movement 
to help stabilize the area, to preserve 
architectural integrity and to attract 
young people. 



To design physical improvements, par- 
ticularly sign systems, in order to in- 
crease the community's awareness of the 
local shopping street as an integral part 
of the neighborhood. 



To produce commercial revitalization ac- 
tion plans for four small towns on the 
Eastern Shore of the Chesapeake Bay: 
Middletown, Delaware; Smyrna, Dela- 
ware; Onancock, Virginia; and Snow 
Hill, Maryland. The effort was a dem- 
onstration project of the Delmarva Con- 
sortium. 



To gather information on the physical 
environment and develop guidelines for 
downtown facades and neighborhood de- 
sign planning in order to initiate revital- 
ization of West Tampa. A report on the 
revitalization plan was issued. 



To support the Texas Main Street Cen- 
ter's program overseeing rehabilitation 
projects in ten communities. The pro- 
gram provided design assistance for 
streetscapes and buildings, educated 
owners in techniques for repairs to his- 
toric properties and developed design 
awareness activities. 



Town of Navasota 

FY 1977 

$9,640 

R70-42-154 

Conlacl: 264 Sugar Berry 

Circle, Houston, TX 77024 



Tuskegee Institute 

FY 1984 

$15,000 

42-4231-0033 

Conlacl: President, 

Tuskegee Institute, 

Department of 

Architecture, Tuskegee, AL 

36088 



University of Hawaii 
FY 1981 
$4,780 
12-4211-125 
Conlacl: University of 
Hawaii, 107 Parteus Hall, 
2424 Maile Way, Honolulu, 
HI 96822 



University of Nebraska, 

Lincoln 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

92-4233-082 

Conlacl: Assistant Professor, 

Community Development, 

University of Nebraska, 

Lincoln, NE 68588 



University of Wisconsin, 

Green Bay 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

92-4233-083 

Conlacl: Project Director, 

University of Wisconsin, 

Green Bay, WI 54302 



Village of Holly 

FY 1981 

$10,000 

1 2-4230-066 

Conlacl: Supervisor, Village 

of Holly, 201 Elm Street, 

Holly. Ml 48442 



Vision, Inc. 

FY 1980 

$30,000 

02-4222-058 

Conlacl: President, Vision, 

Inc., 678 Massachu.sctts 

Avenue. Cambridge, MA 

02139 



To draft a study on townscape preserva- 
tion and enhancement of Navasota, 
Texas, that emphasizes citizen participa- 
tion strategies. 



To create design strategies for the re- 
vitalization of the Greenwood neighbor- 
hood, a historically and economically sig- 
nificant part of Tuskegee, Alabama. A 
report documented the study. 



To support graduate research projects fo- 
cusing on urban design principles for in- 
ner-city neighborhood reinvestment, 
mixed-use redevelopment projects and 
pedestrian-oriented streets. 



To develop a strategy for the revitaliza- 
tion of the oldest commercial area in 
downtown Lincoln, Nebraska. 



To develop a detailed revitalization plan 
for portions of the central business dis- 
trict of Green Bay, Wisconsin. Pedes- 
trian studies were produced through 
collaboration of a planner-designer, an 
environmental psychologist and a sculp- 
tor-graphic artist. 



To formulate a plan for the growth of 
downtown Holly, Michigan, a village of 
5,000 surrounded by an expanding re- 
gion. Recommendations for urban de- 
sign, building improvements and basic 
land use and zoning ordinance revisions 
were covered in a study report. 



To research and produce an American 
Neighborhood Atlas, a working tool for 
community planners, historic preserva- 
tionists and designers. A 250-page draft 
that documents the physical design 
characteristics of planned suburban resi- 
dential communities was produced. 



10 CHAPTER ONE 



Waterfront Area Historic 
League of New Bedford 
FY 1987 
$20,000 
87-4251-0122 
Contact: President, 
Waterfront Historic Area 
League of New Bedford, 
Inc., 13 Centre Street, New 
Bedford. MA 02740 



Worcester Cooperative 

Council 

FY 1979 

$20,000 

92-4233-127 

Contact: Worcester 

Cooperative Council, 791 

Main Street, Worcester, 

MA 01610 



To rehabilitate historic storefronts in the 
National Register district of central New 
Bedford, Massachusetts, through a down- 
town storefront design program. 



To design and build non-subsidized hous- 
ing on vacant lots in older neighborhoods 
in Worcester, Massachusetts. A report 
entitled Reclaiming Empty Urban Lots 
and specifications for constructing infill 
structures were issued. 



Historic Preservation Techniques 

Surveys, design guidelines, generic reuse ideas and educa- 
tional materials aimed at tailoring preservation to existing 
contexts. 



Alaska Historical Society 

FY 1979 

$25,000 

92-4233-058 

Contact: Project Director, 

Alaska Historical Society, 

Box 10355, Anchorage, AK 

99511 



Albuquerque Community 

FY 1987 

$36,743 

87-4251-0059 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Albuquerque Community, 

3208 Central Avenue, 

Albuquerque, NM 87166 



Alexander, Ann H. 

FY 1979 

$5,000 

91-4232-096 

Comart. 312 Child Hall, 

Harvard University, 

Cambridge, MA 02138 



To prepare design guidelines and a pres- 
ervation master plan for two old copper 
mining towns in Alaska. In the resulting 
report, Kennecott, Alaska: A Historic 
Preservation Plan, prime consideration 
was given to enhancing the historic, cul- 
tural and aesthetic aspects. 



To study the adaptive reuse of roadside 
architecture (chiefly gas stations and mo- 
tels) as housing and commercial space. 
The aims were to determine the eco- 
nomic potentials of reuse and to devise 
schematic designs for site and building 
plans. 



To document the remaining terra cotta 
architecture in the central business dis- 
trict of Seattle, Washington, in prepara- 
tion for a thematic group nomination to 
the National Register of Historic Places. 
A 1 25-page report entitled Terra Cotta 
was issued. 



Alexander, James R. 

FY 1985 

$10,000 

51-4213-0058 

Contact: 29 1 2 Tenth Court 

South, Birmingham, AL 

35205 



Allied Arts Foundation 

FY 1979 

$8,250 

92-4212-138 

Contact: Architect, Allied 

Arts Foundation, 107 South 

Main, Seattle, WA 98104 



Amana Preservation 

Foundation 

FY 1980 

$9,550 

02-4250-106 

Contact: Project Director, 

Amana Preservation 

Foundation, Box 88, 

Amana, lA 52203 



Arai, Gerald 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R7I-42-50N 

Contact: 609 Summit East, 

Seattle, WA 98102 



ArchiTour, Inc. 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R70-42-2 

Contact: ArchiTour, Inc., 

1030 South Barton, No. 

281, Arlington, VA 22204 



Arthur, Robert A. 

FY 1984 

$5,000 

41-4213-0121 

Contact: 24 Harold Street, 

No. 2, Somerville, MA 

02143 



Askeland, Richard A. 

FY 1977 

$1,600 

R71-42-2N 

Contact: 2530 James Street, 

Syracuse, NY 1 3206 



Bayless, ChaHes N. 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R71-42-38N 

Contact: 69 Meeting Street, 

Charleston, SC 29401 



To research and document the use of 
terra cotta tile as a facade and orna- 
mentation material in the distinctive 
vernacular style of the Chicago school of 
architecture from 1875 to 1935. 



To produce a touring exhibition and cat- 
alogue. Art Deco: Seattle, of art deco ar- 
chitecture, art and crafts found in 
Seattle, Washington. 



To conduct a community education pro- 
gram for the historic Amana colonies. 
The program consisted of workshops for 
architects, landscape architects, contrac- 
tors and homeowners. 



To document the traditional Northwest 
longhouse — its various styles and tech- 
niques of construction. 



To develop and expand interpretive pro- 
grams on the architecture of Washing- 
ton, D.C., for residents and visitors. 



For photodocumentation of American art 
moderne bus terminals built during the 
1930s and 1940s. 



To study the barn styles found between 
Albany and Buff"alo, New York. The re- 
search documents the origin, pattern and 
distribution of these structures. 



To document the eighteenth- and nine- 
teenth-century architecture of Charleston 
and the South Carolina low country. A 
series of photographs and an index were 
produced. 



DESIGN FOR COMMUNITIES 1 1 



Bayless, Charles N. 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R8I-42-43N 

Contact: 69 Meeting Street, 

Charleston, SC 29401 



Beasley, Ellen 

FY 1986 

$10,000 

86-4213-0107 

Contact: RO. Box 1 145, 

Galveston, TX 77553 



Bednar, Michael J. 

FY 1984 

$7,100 

41-4213-0128 

Contact: School of 

Architecture, University of 

Virginia, Charlottesville, 

VA 22903 



Bluegrass Area 
Development District 
FY 1979 
$18,500 
92-4233-174 
Contact: Director of 
Planning and Commercial 
Development, Bluegrass 
Area Development District, 
1 20 East Reynolds Road, 
Lexington, KY 40503 



Bourdier, Jean-Paul 

FY 1987 

$10,000 

87-4216-0138 

Contact: University of 

California, College of 

Environmental Design, 232 

Wurster Hall, Berkeley, CA 

94710 



Bowsher, Alice M. 

FY 1977 

$6,990 

R71-42-3N 

Contact: 5 Norman Drive, 

Birmingham, AL 35213 



Bridgeport Neighborhood 

Housing Services 

FY 1979 

$12,500 

92-4233-122 

Contact: Vice-President, 

Bridgeport Neighborhood 

Housing Services, 932 East 

Main Street, Room 207, 

Bridgeport, CT 06608 



To complete a photographic work 
documenting the architecture of Charles- 
ton and the South Carolina low country. 



To evaluate public policies as they affect 
the design of new buildings in historic ar- 
eas. Nine historic communities initially 
studied in 1977 and 1978 were reported 
on in an article that also addressed how 
review processes that include non-design- 
ers influence quality of design. 



For a study of the design of buildings 
with atria. The study covered historical 
evolution, energy efficiency, urban de- 
sign ramifications, economic and tech- 
nical requirements. A book entitled The 
New Atrium was published in 1986. 



To produce an inventory of vacant or un- 
derutilized public buildings in Lexington, 
Kentucky, and a catalogue of historically 
and architecturally significant properties. 



For an international symposium on tradi- 
tional dwellings and settlements. Their 
indigenous vernacular forms are impor- 
tant artifacts that constitute a direct ex- 
pression of changing values, images and 
perceptions. 



To write a handbook for use by architec- 
tural review boards in developing policy 
on design regulation in historic districts. 
The handbook focuses on the state of 
Virginia and is applicable to other states. 



To prepare materials highlighting unique 
historic and architectural elements of 
specific homes in Bridgeport's East Side 
community. 



Brooks Memorial Art 

Gallery 

FY 1978 

$2,930 

R80-42-17 

Contact: Brooks Memorial 

Art Gallery, Overton Park, 

Memphis, TN 38112 



Burke, John Suk J. 

FY 1986 

$5,000 

86-4213-0049 

Contact: Louisiana State 

University, School of 

Architecture, Baton Rouge, 

LA 70803 



Carnegie-Mellon University 
FY 1984 
$31,290 
42-4252-0099 
Contact: Treasurer, 
Carnegie-Mellon University, 
5000 Forbes Avenue, 
Pittsburgh, PA 15213 



Cathedral of St. John 

Divine 

FY 1984 

$50,000 

42-4213-0112 

Contact: Dean, The 

Cathedral of St. John the 

Divine, 1047 Amsterdam 

Avenue, New York, NY 

10025 



Center for Building 

Conservation 

FY 1982 

$10,000 

22-4250-045 

Contact: President, Center 

for Building Conservation, 

171 John Street, New York. 

NY 10038 



Center for Building 

Conservation 

FY 1983 

$10,000 

32-4250-00179 

Contact: Library Director, 

Center for Building 

Conservation. 171 John 

Street. New York. NY 

10038 



For an exhibit on the architectural heri- 
tage of Memphis, Tennessee. A report 
entitled Time and Place: A Review of 
Memphis Architecture was issued. 



To study the history and design of Loui- 
siana houses with respect to the cultural, 
sociological, environmental and techno- 
logical influences that shaped them. 



To investigate ways of relating new 
building to the character and form of 
historic neighborhoods. 



To support the apprentice internship pro- 
gram of Stoneyard Institute, which is 
dedicated to developing and preserving 
the craft skills of stonecutting, carving 
and setting. Apprentices gained master 
skills and contributed to the completion 
of the southwest tower of the Cathedral 
of St. John the Divine in New York City. 



To produce an exhibition that demon- 
strates how American windows are made, 
with samples from the major periods in 
American architecture. 



To complete a preliminary inventory of 
the New York Architectural Terra Cotta 
Company archives. The materials record 
the richness and variety of terra cotta's 
uses from the late nineteenth century 
through the art deco era. A videotape 
was produced. 



12 CHAPTER ONE 



Central School Preservation. 

Inc. 

FY 1986 

$10,000 

86-4256-0026 

Contact: President, Central 

School Preservation, Inc.. 

R.R. 2, Box 23. Lake City, 

I A 51449 



Cheswick Center 

FY 1977 

$12,500 

R70^2-28 

Contact: Project Director. 

The Cheswick Center. 17 

Dunster Street. Cambridge. 

MA 02138 



Chotas, James 

FY 1986 

$10,000 

86-4213-0117 

Contact: 265 East 78th 

Street. Apt. 4D. New York, 

NY 10021 



City of Alameda 

FY 1977 

$4,000 

R70-42-1I8 

Contact: Senior Planner. 

City of Alameda. Planning 

Department. City Hall. 

Alameda. CA 94501 



City of Annapolis 

FY 1977 

$20,000 

R7a42-186 

Contact: Deputy Director. 

City of Annapolis. 

Municipal Building, 

Annapolis, MD 21401 



City of Cape May 

FY 1977 

$20,000 

R7a42-192 

Contact: Architectural 

Historian. 3901 Connecticut 

Avenue. N.W., Washington. 

DC 20008 



City of Cape May 

FY 1978 

$3,770 

R80-42-I20C 

Contact: City of Cape May. 

Cape May, NJ 08204 



To produce publications on the upper 
Northern Raccoon River valley of Iowa 
and on the preservation of the 100-year- 
old Central School, on the National Reg- 
ister of Historic Places. 



To initiate a public-awareness program 
on the potential use of abandoned and 
underused church properties in New 
York City. The aim was to highlight the 
role of religious institutions in neighbor- 
hood preservation. 



To survey and photograph examples of 
stained glass throughout the state of 
Georgia. 



To develop design guidelines for an older 
neighborhood with Victorian structures. 
The guidelines include information on re- 
storing buildings that have lost their orig- 
inal ornamentation and techniques to 
make newer buildings compatible with 
the adjacent Victorian structures. 



To devise a master plan for conserving 
historic downtown Annapolis, Maryland. 
A report on the plan gives a feasibility 
study and environmental, preservation 
and urban design concepts to be incorpo- 
rated into the city plan. 



To produce a survey of properties in 
Cape May, New Jersey, and a restora- 
tion handbook to assist owners of late 
nineteenth-century frame buildings in se- 
lecting appropriate materials, paint col- 
ors and detail finishes. 



To conduct workshops for property own- 
ers in Cape May, New Jersey, on the 
technical and legal aspects of preserving 
historic indigenous architecture. A book 
entitled The Cape May Handbook was 
published by the Athenium of Philadel- 
phia in 1977. 



City of Duluth 

FY 1977 

$22,440 

R70-42-4B 

Contact: Director, City of 

Duluth. Department of 

Planning and Development. 

409 City Hall. Duluth. MN 

55802 



City of Eugene 

FY 1977 

$14,330 

R70-42-120 

Contact: Superintendent of 

Rehabilitation and Codes, 

City of Eugene. City Hall, 

Room 106, Eugene, OR 

97401 



City of Greenbelt 

FY 1977 

$20,000 

R70-42-123 

Contact: Assistant General 

Manager, Greenbelt Homes, 

Inc., Hamilton Place, 

Greenbelt, MD 20770 



City of Lucan 

FY 1977 

$4,500 

R70-42-152 

Contact: City Coordinator, 

City of Lucan, Lucan, MN 

56255 



City of New Orleans 

FY 1979 

$15,000 

92-4233-062 

Contact: Assistant Director, 

City of New Orleans, City 

Hall, New Orleans, LA 

70112 



City of Oakland 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R80-42-I62 

Contact: Victorian Row 

Project Coordinator, City of 

Oakland, 1421 Washington 

Street, Oakland, CA 84612 



To prepare designs and models for Tour 
Duluth, a citywide, unified graphics sys- 
tem identifying historic and natural fea- 
tures, public sites and buildings. 



To study the feasibility of moving his- 
toric structures in Eugene, Oregon, from 
neighborhoods threatened by develop- 
ment to vacant parcels in adjacent neigh- 
borhoods with historic character. A re- 
port entitled Housemoving: Old Houses 
Make Good Neighbors was issued. 



For structural, financial and design stud- 
ies and development of prototype treat- 
ments for buildings and grounds and 
open spaces, as part of the rehabilitation 
of Greenbelt, Maryland, a city built by 
the federal government in 1936. Three 
reports documented the work. 



To prepare an inventory of historic prop- 
erties, a comprehensive preservation plan 
and a local training program for a coali- 
tion of five small towns in southwestern 
Minnesota. A 170-page report on the five 
Redwood county towns was issued. 



To analyze the visual and aesthetic 
impacts of land uses for major intersec- 
tions in older New Orleans neighbor- 
hoods. A report was produced and con- 
tains recommendations on zoning, design, 
commercial revitalization and aesthetic 
improvements. 



To formulate a development plan for the 
old Oakland area, to establish a store- 
front museum and to assist programs of 
the Old Oakland Association. 



DESIGN FOR COMMUNITIES 13 



City of Paterson 

FY 1977 

$19,750 

R7a42-I58 

Contact: 52 Church Street, 

Jersey City, NJ 07505 



Classical America, Inc. 

FY 1984 

$7,500 

42-4255-0045 

Contact: President, Classical 

America, Inc., 227 East 

50th Street. New York, NY 

10022 



Comp, Allan T. 

FY 1983 

$9,160 

3M213-O0142 

Contact: P.O. Box 12932, 

Seattle, WA 98101 



Connecticut Trust for 

Historic Preservation 

FY 1985 

$22,000 

52-4231-0086 

Contact: Acting Director, 

Connecticut Trust for 

Historic Preservation, 152 

Temple Street, New Haven, 

CT 06510 



Cooper Union for the 

Advancement of Science 

and Art 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R70^2-170 

Contact: Assistant Professor, 

Cooper Union for the 

Advancement of Science 

and Art, Cooper Square, 

New York, NY 10003 



Craft and Folk Art Museum 

FY 1980 

$20,000 

02-4250-113 

Contact: Program Director, 

Craft and Folk Art 

Museum, 5814 Wilshire 

Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 

90036 



To plan and design an exhibit on mill 
buildings in the Great Falls historic dis- 
trict in Paterson, New Jersey. The ex- 
hibit included interpretive material on 
the area's social and industrial history. 
An exhibit catalogue entitled Paterson: 
Images of People, Power, Progress, 
Pride was produced. 



For the final production phase of a publi- 
cation analyzing classical design and ar- 
chitecture in Washington, D.C. 



To complete work on a preservation 
study of Virginia City, a National His- 
toric Landmark, to serve as a prototype 
for historic preservation in other western 
states. The study was documented in 
three volumes. 



To develop a growth management pro- 
cess for small towns that protects a 
town's natural and historic character. 
Guildford, Connecticut, served as a pilot 
for a plan to guide new development. 
Four reports were issued. 



To study and evaluate alternative uses 
for vacant and underutilized industrial 
buildings in Trenton, New Jersey. The 
aim was to generate recommendations 
for reuse. A study report on the area was 
produced. 



To prepare an extensive survey of 
vernacular architecture in America. The 
project included exhibitions, seminars 
and a conference, and a book entitled 
Home Sweet Home: American Domestic 
Vernacular Architecture was published 
in 1983. A $20,000 amendment, grant 
number 1 2-4250-9003, was made in 
1981. 



Craft and Folk Art Museum 

FY 1983 

$15,000 

32-4250-00030 

Contact: Program Director, 

Craft and Folk Art 

Museum, 5814 Wilshire 

Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 

90036 



Crowell, Susan E. 

FY 1983 

$10,000 

31-4213-00012 

Contact: Lecturer in Art, 

University of Michigan, 707 

Fifth Street, Ann Arbor, Ml 

48103 



Documentary Education 

Resources, Inc. 

FY 1986 

$15,000 

86-4256-0060 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Documentary Education 

Resources, Inc., 5 Bridge 

Street, Watertown, MA 

02172 



Dole, Philip H. 
FY 1983 
$10,000 
31-4213-00144 
Contact: University of 
Oregon, School of 
Architecture and Allied 
Arts, Eugene, OR 97403 



Don't Tear It Down 

FY 1987 

$15,000 

87-4251-0063 

Contact: President, Don't 

Tear It Down, 930 F Street, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20004 



Easterling, Keller Ann 

FY 1985 

$5,000 

51-4213-0138 

Contact: 799 Sixth Avenue, 

New York, NY 



To produce an exhibition on American 
vernacular architecture: buildings and 
places that are not the works of well- 
known architects, but of Americans de- 
signing and building to fit their specific 
needs. 



To investigate the use of ceramics in 
housing and building design, and in par- 
ticular their aesthetic integration into 
heating and cooking techniques. A series 
of slides documented the project and an 
article, "Tile and Masonry Stoves," was 
published. 



To produce a film on Charles J. Connick 
Associates, designers of Gothic stained- 
glass windows since 1912. Windows pro- 
duced by the studio are found in more 
than 5,000 buildings. 



To document the architectural traces of 
the migrations of three groups to Oregon. 
The migrations occurred between 1 800 
and 1870, and the vernacular styles left 
behind are found in New England, New 
York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Kentucky, 
Missouri and Iowa. A report and slides 
were produced. 



For the preliminary phase of a survey 
and preservation plan for some 2,600 
apartment buildings constructed before 
1946 in Washington, D.C. Buildings 
meeting historic criteria were nominated 
for the local and national registers. 



To complete Small Towns Revisited, a 
handbook of drawings and photographs. 
Local archives were searched and local 
residents interviewed for the project. 



14 CHAPTER ONE 



Erskine. Maren 

FY 1982 

$9,000 

2M213-018 

Conlaci: 361 West 36th 

Street. New York, NY 

10018 



Fain, William H.. Jr. 

FY 1978 

$6,000 

R81-42-30N 

Coniaci: 3339 Dent Place, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20007 



Favretti, Rudy J. 
FY 1986 
$5,000 
86-4213-0105 
Contact: PO. Box 403, 
Storrs, CT 06268 



Ford, Robert M 

FY 1981 

$9,000 

11-4213-222 

Contact: Box 1438, 

Mississippi State, MS 

39762 



Foundation for San 

Francisco's Architectural 

Heritage 

FY 1977 

$15,000 

R70-42-I3I 

Contact: The Foundation for 

San Francisco's 

Architectural Heritage, 

2007 Franklin Street, San 

Francisco, CA 94109 



Friends of the Nancy Hanks 

Center. Inc. 

FY 1985 

$2,500 

52-4251-0076 

Contact: President, Friends 

of the Nancy Hanks Center, 

Inc., 1 100 Pennsylvania 

Avenue, N.W., Washington, 

DC 20506 



To Study the rapidly changing urban 
environment known as Hell's Kitchen in 
Manhattan's West Side. The neighbor- 
hood has evolved over a turbulent 1 77 
years from farm, to high-density immi- 
grant housing, to industrial center and 
transport terminus. 



To investigate the use of real property 
taxation as an incentive for saving land- 
mark buildings and districts in several 
cities. 



To produce a master plan for Memorial 
Hall and its grounds, a National Historic 
Landmark in West Fairmount Park, 
Philadelphia. Memorial Hall was built in 
1875 on Philadelphia's Centennial 
grounds and is the only major building 
remaining from the exhibit. Blueprints 
and a report were produced. 



To study traditional Mississippi architec- 
ture, with particular emphasis on energy- 
conscious design. A report documented 
the study. 



To inventory San Francisco's downtown 
commercial center, an area threatened 
by large-scale development. The aim was 
to identify and document significant 
buildings, streetscapes and urban design 
elements. A book, Splendid Survivors: 
San Francisco's Downtown Architectural 
Heritage by Michael R. Corbett, was 
published in 1979. 



For the design of a small installation to 
allow visitors to view a film on the story 
of the Old Post Office Building. 



Friends of the Schindler 

House 

FY 1985 

$7,795 

52-4256-0038 

Contact: President, Friends 

of the Schindler House, 835 

North Kings Road, Los 

Angeles, CA 90069 



Friends of the Timberline 
FY 1983 
$12,000 
32-4230-00062 
Contact: Executive 
Secretary, Friends of the 
Timberline, Government 
Camp, OR 97028 



Gill, Brendan 

FY 1983 

$10,000 

31-4213-00146 

Contact: The New Yorker, 

25 West 43rd Street, 20th 

Floor, New York, NY 

10036 



Glass Art Society, Inc. 

FY 1985 

$13,075 

52-4256-0110 

Contact: President, Glass 

Art Society, Inc., PO. Box 

1364, Corning, NY 14830 



Haase, Ronald W. 

FY 1984 

$10,000 

41-4213-0133 

Contact: 607 S.W. 27th 

Street, Gainesville, FL 

32607 



Harmon, William James 

FY 1977 

$9,650 

CA 80-8 

Contact: 1 800 Old Meadow 

Road, McLean, VA 22101 



Harwood, M. Buie 

FY 1982 

$10,000 

21-4213-174 

Contact: Associate 

Professor, Interior Design, 

North Texas State 

University, Department of 

Art and Interior Design, 

Denton, TX 76203 



To publish a catalogue to accompany an 
exhibit documenting Frank Lloyd 
Wright's textile block system — rein- 
forced concrete block construction — in 
southern California in 1923 and 1924. 



To design a museum within the Timber- 
line Lodge. The lodge is an example of 
the unique hand craftsmanship and artis- 
tic achievement of the Works Progress 
Administration's heavy timber construc- 
tion. It now serves as a lodge and inn for 
skiers, hikers and tourists. 



To produce a photographic survey of 
New York City's seven hundred land- 
mark structures and its forty-six historic 
districts. 



To hold a conference in autumn 1985 to 
identify, illustrate and examine the rela- 
tionship between glass art and architec- 
tural design. The conference proceedings 
were published in the December 1985 is- 
sue of Journal, the magazine of the 
Glass Art Society. 



To produce a collection of slides illustrat- 
ing a disappearing part of Florida's early 
architectural history, the cracker farm- 
house. 



To research and inventory private 
sources for the establishment of a na- 
tional museum of the building arts. 



To document decorative painting in his- 
toric buildings built in Texas from the 
1840s to the 1940s. The aim was to cata- 
logue and analyze the paintings and pro- 
vide bibliographic information on the art- 
ists and their works. Several articles and 
nominations to the National Register of 
Historic Places resulted. 



DESIGN FOR COMMUNITIES 15 



Heinz, Thomas A. 

FY 1978 

$5,000 

R8 1-42-3 IN 

Contact: PO. Box 663, Oak 

Park, IL 60301 



Heinz, Thomas A. 

FY 1981 

$9,000 

11-4213-226 

Contact: PO. Box 663, Oak 

Park. IL 60303 



Heritage Foundation of 

Arizona 

FY 1983 

$10,000 

32-4250-00036 

Contact: President, Heritage 

Foundation of Arizona, PO. 

Box 25616, Tempe, AZ 

85282 



Hlrshorn, Paul M./Blatteau, 

John 

FY 1983 

$10,000 

31-4213-00149 

Contact: University of 

Pennsylvania, Department 

of Architecture, 

Philadelphia, PA 19104 



Historic Albany Foundation, 

Inc. 

FY 1979 

$12,000 

92-4212-146 

Contact: Historic Albany 

Foundation, Inc., 300 

Hudson Avenue, Albany, 

NY 12210 



Historic Albany Foundation, 

Inc. 

FY 1983 

$5,450 

32^250-00107 

Contact: Director, Technical 

Assistance, Historic Albany 

Foundation, Inc., Albany, 

NY 12210 



Historic Centerville, Inc. 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R80-42-44 

Contact: Preservation 

Coordinator, Historic 

Centerville, Inc., PO. Box 

73, Centerville, IN 47330 



To Study the art glass used by American 
architects and builders in residential 
structures of the late nineteenth and 
early twentieth centuries. 



To complete a study and catalogue of 
Frank Lloyd Wright's glass art. 



For a conference on the preservation of 
historic adobe buildings. Adobe has un- 
dergone a renaissance as a building ma- 
terial in the Southwest, but technical in- 
formation about it is in short supply. A 
533-page report was published. 



To determine the architectural signifi- 
cance of nineteenth-century rowhouses 
and to examine the refinements and ad- 
aptations made to accommodate changed 
living patterns and urban contexts. 



To operate a technical assistance pro- 
gram encouraging the public and private 
sectors to strive for excellence in new de- 
sign and restoration. A report and the 
newsletter Weathervane documented the 
project. 



To conduct a seminar for administrators 
and building-maintenance supervisors of 
historic buildings on college campuses in 
New York State. A report, Older Build- 
ings on Campus: Realistic Approaches 
to Management and Maintenance, was 
issued. 



For research on the architecture of 
Centerville, Indiana. The research 
formed part of program to increase pub- 
lic awareness and establish plans and 
guidelines for building restoration in the 
historic district. 



Historic Faubourg St. Mary 

Corporation of New Orleans 

FY 1981 

$10,000 

12-4230-064 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Historic Faubourg St. Mary 

Corporation of New 

Orleans, 61 1 Gravier Street, 

New Orleans, LA 70130 



Historic Hawaii Foundation 

FY 1986 

$25,000 

86-4256-0095 

Contact: President, Historic 

Hawaii Foundation, PO. 

Box 1658, Honolulu, HI 

96806 



Historic Madison, Inc. 

FY 1977 

$6,550 

R70-42-133 

Contact: Director, Historic 

Madison, Inc., 500 West 

Street, Madison, Wl 47250 



Historic Neighborhoods 

Foundation, Inc. 

FY 1979 

$7,540 

92-4212-042 

Contact: Director, Historic 

Neighborhoods Foundation, 

Inc., One Exeter Street, 

Boston, MA 02109 



Historic Neighborhoods 

Foundation, Inc. 

FY 1980 

$7,950 

02-4250-119 

Contact: Director, Historic 

Neighborhood Foundation, 

Inc., 71 Commercial Street, 

Boston, MA 02109 



Historic Pullman 

Foundation 

FY 1982 

$10,000 

22-4250050 

Contact: Projects Manager, 

Historic Pullman 

Foundation, 1111 South 

Forestville Avenue, 

Chicago, I L 60628 



To expand Historic Faubourg's model fa- 
cade easement donation program. The 
program provides information about the 
benefits of preservation and renovation, 
negotiates donation documents, super- 
vises covenants and organizes volunteer 
architectural review committees. 



To produce a fifteen-minute video and a 
workbook for a statewide program to 
educate decision-makers about design is- 
sues, especially those affecting Hawaii's 
fragile physical environment. The video 
is entitled "Maintaining a Sense of 
Place." 



To publish an architectural handbook for 
the historic district of Madison, Indiana, 
to serve as a guide to preservation of the 
133-block area. 



For the North End Local Awareness 
Project, a six-week course on the archi- 
tectural significance of the North End of 
Boston for residents and the surrounding 
communities. 



To complete an educational program for 
residents on the architectural value of 
Boston's North End and to reach a key 
group omitted from an earlier program, 
middle-aged households. Two pamphlets 
were published in conjunction with the 
project. 



To produce a multimedia slide presenta- 
tion that tells the story of Pullman — the 
man, the company and the town. The 
historic Pullman district provided hous- 
ing for railroad car workers and is a 
prime example of nineteenth-century ur- 
ban planning. 



16 CHAPTER ONE 



Historic Seattle 
Preservation and 
Development Authority 
FY 1977 
$10,000 
R70^2-I34 

Contact: Executive Director, 
Historic Seattle 
Preservation and 
Development Authority, 
1241 Smith Tower. Seattle, 
WA 98104 



Historic Seattle 
Preservation and 
Development Authority 
FY 1984 
$9,950 
42-4256-0161 

Contact: Executive Director. 
Historic Seattle 
Preservation and 
Development Authority, 
207'/! First Avenue South, 
Seattle, WA 98104 



Historic St. Michaels Bay 

Hundred. Inc. 

FY 1987 

$5,000 

87^251-0011 

Contact: President, Historic 

St. Michaels Bay Hundred, 

Inc., RO. Box 972. St. 

Michaels, MD 21663 



Honesdale Borough 
FY 1979 
$2,000 
92-4233-185 
Contact: Project 
Coordinator. 958 Main 
Street, Honesdale, PA 
18431 



Hubka. Thomas C 

FY 1981 

$8,500 

11-4213-091 

Contact: Associate Professor 

of Architecture, Department 

of Architecture. University 

of Oregon. Eugene. OR 

97403 



Jacksonville University 

FY 1978 

$15,000 

R80-42-23 

Contact: Jacksonville 

University. University 

Boulevard North. 

Jacksonville. FL 32211 



To carry out research on structures and 
open spaces in downtown Seattle eligible 
for National Register and official Seattle 
landmark listing. A book, Sights of Seat- 
tle: Downtown, was also published. 



To publish Historic Preservation in Seat- 
tle, a ninety-page book by Lawrence 
Kreisman, which documents the civic ac- 
tivism, policy, legislation and public-pri- 
vate partnerships central to Seattle's 
preservation efforts. 



To produce guidelines for the preserva- 
tion of the commercial main street of St. 
Michaels, Maryland. More than 200 of 
the area's Chesapeake vernacular struc- 
tures date to the late 1700s. The guide- 
lines include illustrated materials for 
preservation of architectural detail. 



To prepare an inventory of cultural and 
historic assets in downtown Honesdale, 
Pennsylvania. 



For an analysis of the vernacular ar- 
chitecture of northern New England, 
particularly the connected house-to-barn 
structure. A brief report resulted. 



For research on aboriginal American ar- 
chitecture in the United States. 



Institute on Man and 

Science 

FY 1985 

$7,500 

52-1231-0016 

Contact: President, Institute 

on Man and Science, 

Rensselaerville, NY 12147 



Island Resources 

Foundation 

FY 1981 

$15,000 

1 2-4250O09 

Contact: Director, Island 

Resources Foundation, 

History and Culture 

Programs, PO. Box 4187, 

St. Thomas, VI 00801 



Kay, Jane Holtz 

FY 1982 

$10,000 

21-4213-095 

Contact: Journalist, 

Christian Science Monitor, 

111 Statler Office Building, 

Boston, MA 021 16 



Landsberg, Mark 

FY 1979 

$2,000 

91-4231-274 

Contact: 98 Oxford Street, 

Somerville, MA 02143 



Margolies. John 

FY 1978 

$9,765 

R81-42-I5N 

Contact: 111 West 72nd 

Street, Apt. 3A, New York, 

NY 10023 



Margolies, John 

FY 1982 

$10,000 

21-4213-099 

Contact: 111 West 72nd 

Street. Apt. 3A, New York, 

NY 10023 



Margolies, John 

FY 1984 

$10,000 

41-4213-0138 

Contact: 111 West 72nd 

Street, Apt. 3A, New York, 

NY 10023 



To prepare a master plan for the re- 
habilitation of Arbor Hill, a historic es- 
tate in a low-income area of Albany, 
New York. The aim was to provide pub- 
lic parkland and community meeting 
space. 



To develop a videotape, slide show and 
exhibition documenting the unique 
vernacular architecture of the Virgin Is- 
lands. The video is entitled "The West 
Indian Wooden Cottage: Vernacular Ar- 
chitecture in the Virgin Islands." 



To produce a book analyzing historic 
preservation in New England. The aim 
was to explore the varied cultural, envi- 
ronmental and architectural attributes of 
the region, its preservation problems and 
solutions. Preserving New England was 
published in 1986, written by the grantee 
with Pauline Chase-Harrell. 



To compile a concise compendium of de- 
sign concerns for inclusion in the pres- 
ervation plan for the Old Miami Beach 
historic district. 



To research and document commercial 
vernacular architecture in the tri-state 
New York City region, with particular 
emphasis on such building types as 
movie theaters, gas stations, restaurants 
and storefronts. 



To document and analyze American 
commercial architecture, particularly 
movie theaters, eating and drinking 
establishments, gas stations, motels and 
roadside amusements. More than 350 
slides resulted from the project. 



For photodocumentation and design anal- 
ysis of major commercial resorts along 
the Atlantic coast, from Rehobeth 
Beach, Delaware, to Jekyll Island, Geor- 
gia. A series of slides resulted, and a lim- 
ited-edition book. Miniature Golf, was 
published by Abbeville Press. 



DESIGN FOR COMMUNITIES 1 7 



Margolies, John 

FY 1987 

$10,000 

87-4216-0148 

Contact: 222 West 72nd 

Street, Apt. 3A, New York, 

NY 10023 



Marsh, Vincent 

FY 1980 

$7,500 

01-4214-026 

Contact: 44 Hampstead 

Road, Jamaica Plain, MA 

02130 



Maryland Association of 
Historic District 
Commissions 
FY 1984 
$28,000 . 
42-4255-0050 
Contact: Treasurer, 
Maryland Association of 
Historic District 
Commissions, PO. Box 783, 
Frederick, MD 21701 



Matuszeski, William 

FY 1977 

$5,000 

R71-42-7N 

Contact: A\'i Fifth Street, 

S.E., Washington, DC 

20003 



Means, Mary C. 

FY 1983 

$10,000 

31-4213-00014 

Contact: Director, Special 

Projects, National Trust for 

Historic Preservation, 203 

North Columbus Street, 

Alexandria, VA 22314 



Metropolitan Dade County 
Office of Community and 
Economic Development 
FY 1981 
$23,790 
12-4250-202 
Contact: Director. 
Community and Economic 
Development, 90 S.W. 
Eighth Street. Suite 309. 
Miami, FL 33130 



For photodocumentation and analysis of 
Main Street architecture in small- and 
medium-sized Midwest cities. Research 
concentrated on movie theaters, civic 
structures, banks, storefronts and indus- 
trial buildings in urban, suburban and ru- 
ral contexts. 



To prepare research and photographs 
documenting fifty buildings in the North 
End waterfront section of Boston, and to 
work with neighborhood residents to ob- 
tain historic designation of the area. Two 
illustrated reports documented the ef- 
forts. 



To develop a 25-minute videotape, "Built 
by Design," which identifies and commu- 
nicates design principles characteristic of 
historic buildings and districts. The film 
was intended for officials who are in- 
volved in preservation work but lack de- 
sign backgrounds. 



To prepare a book, Gritty Cities: A Sec- 
ond Look at Allentown, Bethlehem, 
Bridgeport and Hoboken, on the pres- 
ervation potential of older industrial cit- 
ies of the northeastern United States. It 
was coauthored with Mary Proctor and 
issued in 1978 by Temple University 
Press. 



To write a book on the preservation 
movement that takes into account the 
challenges posed by major shifts in de- 
mographics and financial markets. 



To conduct a design-awareness campaign 
that describes Miami's architectural heri- 
tage: its twentieth-century technology 
and the eclectic Mediterranean, Moorish 
and Spanish architectural styles. A book. 
From Wilderness to Metropolis: The 
History and Architecture of Dade 
County, Florida, 1825-1940, was pub- 
lished in 1982. 



Miami Design Preservation 

League 

FY 1979 

$21,500 

92-4233-199 

Contact: Miami Design 

Preservation League, 1630 

Euclid Avenue. Miami, FL 

33139 



Miami Design Preservation 

League 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

92-4212-047 

Contact: Director, Miami 

Design Preservation League, 

2100 Washington Avenue, 

Miami Beach, FL 33139 



Michigan Architectural 

Foundation 

FY 1982 

$10,000 

22-4250-058 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Michigan Architectural 

Foundation, Carriage 

House, 1995 East 

Woodbridge, Detroit, MI 

48207 



Minneapolis Society of Fine 

Arts 

FY 1977 

$5,000 

R70-42-35 

Contact: Project Director, 

Minneapolis Society of Fine 

Arts, 133 East 25th Street, 

Minneapolis, MN 55404 



To develop a comprehensive set of design 
guidelines for the art deco architecture 
of Miami Beach, Florida. A sixty-nine- 
page preservation and development plan 
resulted. 



To carry out research for a publication 
on the art deco architecture of Miami 
Beach, Florida. 



To produce a book documenting the 
early twentieth-century arts and crafts 
movement in Detroit and examining the 
contributions of professionals such as Al- 
bert Kahn, William Bush Stratton and 
the Saarinens. 



To publish a work on the state building 
of Minnesota and to distribute 2,000 free 
copies to schools, libraries and other edu- 
cational institutions in Minnesota. 




A stone-carver uses a chisel and fruitwood mallet — tools un- 
changed since the 13th century — as he works on ornamentation 
for the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New Y'ork City. 



18 CHAPTER ONE 



Mississippi State University 

FY 1985 

$25,000 

52-4256^114 

Contact: Vice-President, 

Graduate Studies, 

Mississippi State University, 

PO. Drawer G, Mississippi 

State, MS 39762 



Mueller, Alfred W 

FY 1977 

$2,500 

R7 1-42-3 IN 

Contact: AW Wight Street, 

Galena, IL 61036 



Municipal Art Society 

FY 1979 

$25,000 

92-4212-150 

Contact: Project Director, 

Municipal Art Society, 30 

Rockefeller Plaza, New 

York, NY 10020 



Municipal Art Society 

FY 1979 

$15,000 

92^233-073 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Municipal Art Society, 457 

Madison Avenue, New 

York, NY 10022 



Municipal Art Society 

FY 1980 

$20,000 

02-4250-127 

Contact: Deputy Director of 

Programs, Municipal Art 

Society, 457 Madison 

Avenue, New York, NY 

10022 



Municipal Art Society 

FY 1981 

$15,000 

12-4250-031 

Contact: Director, Restore, 

Municipal Art Society, 457 

Madison Avenue, New 

York, NY 10022 



To produce a publication about tiie 
Neshoba County Fair, an annual event 
noted for its distinctive design and cul- 
tural programming. In conjunction with 
the Center for Small Town Research and 
Design, the fairgrounds were examined 
as a model small town. 



To prepare a photographic archive on 
Galena, Illinois. A book. The Building of 
Galena: An Architectural Legacy, re- 
sulted. 



To produce an exhibition of the written 
materials documenting the preservation 
of the landmark Villard houses in mid- 
town Manhattan. The exhibition was en- 
titled The Villard Houses: Life Story of 
a Landmark. 



For a training program to update and im- 
prove the skills of craftspersons directly 
involved in the building trades. The pro- 
gram was conducted by nationally recog- 
nized professionals in the fields of archi- 
tectural restoration and preservation 
technology. 



For a multimedia traveling exhibition 
highlighting the impact of Grand Central 
Terminal on New York City — its impor- 
tance both as an architectural monument 
and as a structure with far-reaching de- 
sign and cultural influence. A catalogue 
entitled Grand Central Terminal: City 
within the City, edited by Deborah Nev- 
ins, was published in 1982. 



To develop a national intensive course on 
masonry restoration technology and skills 
designed for commercial contractors and 
craftsmen. The aim was to upgrade de- 
sign sensitivity, problem analysis and un- 
derstanding of current preservation tech- 
nology. 



McNulty, Robert H. 

FY 1985 

$8,575 

51-4213-0062 

Contact: President, Partners 

for Livable Places, 1429 

21sl Street, N.W., 

Washington, DC 20036 



National Building Museum 

FY 1982 

$30,000 

22-4250-061 

Contact: Interpretation 

Center, The National 

Building Museum, 440 G 

Street, N.W., Suite 122, 

Washington, DC 20001 



National Building Museum 

FY 1982 

$30,000 

22-4250-235 

Contact: Director, National 

Building Museum, 440 G 

Street, N.W., Suite 122, 

Washington, DC 20001 



National Building Museum 

FY 1982 

$10,000 

22-4250-236 

Contact: Director, National 

Building Museum, 440 G 

Street, N.W., Suite 122, 

Washington, DC 20001 



National Committee on 

United States-China 

Relations 

FY 1982 

$30,000 

22-4250-062 

Contact: Vice-President, 

National Committee on 

United States-China 

Relations, 777 United 

Nations Plaza, New York, 

NY 10012 



National Conference of 

State Historic Preservation 

Officers 

FY 1981 

$17,500 

1 2-4250-022 

Contact: Executive Director, 

National Conference of 

State Historic Preservation 

Officers, 1522 K Street, 

N.W., Suite 500, 

Washington, DC 20005 



To study the urban archeology of Al- 
exandria, Virginia. The purpose was to 
generate interest in redevelopment and 
urban design of older cities through the 
study of their pasts. A research report 
was issued. 



To plan the National Building Museum's 
first major exhibition, America Builds 
Abroad: Diplomacy and Architecture, an 
overview of the thirty-year program that 
has guided design and construction of 
American embassy buildings around the 
world. 



For the Circulating Film Program, the 
Building Information Center and four 
traveling exhibitions, including Built for 
the People of the United States — Fifty 
Years of TVA Architecture. Two 
$30,000 amendments were made in 
1984: 22-4250-235.9 and 42-4256-90235. 



To produce one issue of Blueprints, the 
National Building Museum newsletter. 
The museum is as a center for the dis- 
semination of information on design, ar- 
chitecture and the quality of the building 
trades. 



To send an American study team to the 
People's Republic of China to investigate 
urban planning and historic preservation. 
A report outlining China's preservation 
policies and regulations was issued. 



To maintain the National Conference of 
State Historic Preservation Officers and 
to develop provisions for local govern- 
ment preservation programs, a critical 
step toward program decentralization. A 
report entitled Certified Local Govern- 
ment Programs resulted. 



DESIGN FOR COMMUNITIES 19 



National Council for Urban 
Economic Development 
FY 1977 
$17,000 
R70-42-138 

Contact: Director, National 
Council for Urban 
Economic Development, 
Technical Assistance 
Services, 1620 I Street, 
N.W., Suite 600, 
Washington, DC 20006 



National Institute for 

Conservation 

FY 1987 

$74,864 

NEA DCA 87-53 

Contact: National Institute 

for Conservation, The 

Smithsonian Institution, 

Arts and Industry Building, 

Washington, DC 20560 



National Trust for Historic 

Preservation 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R8(M2-29 

Contact: National Trust for 

Historic Preservation, 1785 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20036 



National Trust for Historic 

Preservation 

FY 1979 

$30,000 

92-4212-048 

Contact: National Trust for 

Historic Preservation, 1785 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

N.W, Washington, DC 

20036 



National Trust for Historic 

Preservation 

FY 1982 

$5,000 

22-4250-237 

Contact: Vice-President, 

Communications, National 

Trust for Historic 

Preservation, 1785 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20036 



To create a national clearinghouse to 
provide local officials with information 
about programs, policies and techniques 
pertaining to conservation of older neigh- 
borhoods. A handbook of neighborhood 
economic revitalization was also pro- 
duced. 



For an international conference of coun- 
tries of the Western hemisphere address- 
ing critical urban planning and historic 
preservation issues within the context of 
economic development. 



To research and write a sourcebook pro- 
viding ideas and information on materials 
and funding sources for active preserva- 
tion. 



To conduct a wide-ranging program for 
rural conservation. The program included 
a clearinghouse on rural conservation 
techniques, instructive publications, na- 
tional conferences and a technical assis- 
tance program. 



To undertake a feasibility study to deter- 
mine the strength of the market for a 
large-circulation monthly newspaper de- 
voted to preservation. A feasibility report 
was issued. 



National Trust for Historic 

Preservation 

FY 1982 

$25,000 

22-4230-028 

Contact: Administrator, 

Rural Project, National 

Trust for Historic 

Preservation, 1600 H Street, 

N.W, Washington, DC 

20006 



National Trust for Historic 

Preservation 

FY 1985 

$23,297 

52-4256-0115 

Contact: President, National 

Trust for Historic 

Preservation, 1785 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

N.W, Washington, DC 

20036 



National Trust for Historic 

Preservation 

FY 1986 

$50,000 

86-4255-0038 

Contact: President, National 

Trust for Historic 

Preservation, 1785 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

N.W, Washington, DC 

20036 



National Trust for Historic 

Preservation 

FY 1987 

$19,000 

87-4251-0037 

Contact: President, National 

Trust for Historic 

Preservation, 1785 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

N.W, Washington, DC 

20036 



National Trust for Historic 

Preservation 

FY 1987 

$25,000 

87-4251-0073 

Contact: President, National 

Trust for Historic 

Preservation, 1785 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20036 



For a rural preservation and conservation 
program. The project focused on two ru- 
ral communities and developed tech- 
niques for protecting historic structures 
and stimulating the agricultural econ- 
omy. 



To present Commission Issues of the 
Eighties, a series of five one-day work- 
shops in Florida, northern California, 
Pennsylvania, South Carolina and south- 
ern California. The aim was to train 
preservation commissioners in techniques 
for enforcing local ordinances regulating 
historic properties. 



To analyze the impact of tax incentives 
on historic preservation. The study re- 
port, Preserving Public Places, ranks his- 
toric areas by amount of investment and 
total square footage rehabilitated. It also 
includes three case studies and a guide 
for readers to conduct analyses of this 
kind. 



For a one-day conference and a report on 
the effect of building codes on historic 
preservation. The aim was to encourage 
adoption of code provisions that facilitate 
better use of historic buildings. 



To produce a videotape showing the ero- 
sion of historic building surfaces, particu- 
larly those with ornate sculptural detail, 
and summarizing efforts under way to 
preserve these fragile carvings. 



20 CHAPTER ONE 



Neighborhood Housing 

Services 

FY 1986 

$18,375 

86-4231-0069 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Neighborhood Housing 

Services. 1612 St Charles 

Street. Jackson, MS 39209 



New York Landmarks 

Conservancy 

FY 1982 

524,000 

22-4250-147 

Contact: Associate Director, 

New York Landmarks 

Conservancy. 330 West 

42nd Street, New York, NY 

10036 



New York Landmarks 

Conservancy 

FY 1983 

$19,790 

32-1252-00128 

Contact: Executive Director. 

New York Landmarks 

Conservancy, 330 West 

42nd Street, New York, NY 

10036 



New York Landmarks 

Conservancy 

FY 1984 

$15,000 

42-1255-0086 

Contact: Executive Director. 

New York Landmarks 

Conservancy. 330 West 

42nd Street. New York, NY 

10036 



New York Landmarks 

Conservancy 

FY 1985 

$30,000 

52-4231-0093 

Contact: Executive Director. 

New York Landmarks 

Conservancy. 330 West 

42nd Street. New York. NY 

10036 



New York Landmarks 

Preservation Foundation 

FY 1981 

$19,875 

12^230-072 

Contact: Chairman. New 

York Landmarks 

Preservation Foundation. 

305 Broadway. New York. 

NY 10007 



To Study the adaptive reuse of the "shot- 
gun" house of Jackson, Mississippi, a 
long rectilinear house form common 
throughout the southeastern United 
States. The goal was to devise a plan for 
low- and middle-income families to buy 
the contemporary shotgun. 



To produce an exhibition and catalogue 
on the history and restoration of New 
York City's landmark U.S. Custom 
House. The landmark was recently reno- 
vated for reuse as federal office space 
and an exhibition site following a major 
design competition. 



To study and disseminate information on 
new and existing methods of repairing 
and replacing masonry facade orna- 
mentation. A video and a report entitled 
Historic Building Facades: A Manual 
for Inspection and Rehabilitation were 
produced. 



To carry out research and establish a 
database on religious properties of archi- 
tectural and historic merit. A report, Re- 
ligious Properties Survey, documented 
the project. 



For a design study of underutilized and 
unused armories. The research focused 
on three model preservation studies of 
architecturally important armories. The 
aim was to create a model process for 
preservation or reuse of this building 
type- 



To develop designs for street and side- 
walk pavements, street furniture, lighting 
and signs that enhance and highlight 
New York City's historic districts. A re- 
port entitled Open Space Designs in His- 
toric Districts was produced. 



New York Landmarks 

Preservation Foundation 

FY 1985 

$25,000 

52-4256-0011 

Contact: Chairman. New 

York Landmarks 

Preservation Foundation, 

330 West 42nd Street, New 

York, NY 10036 



North Carolina State 

University 

FY 1977 

$10,640 

R70-42-38 

Contact: North Carolina 

State University. Raleigh, 

NC 27607 



Northwest Institute for 
Historic Preservation 
FY 1985 
$15,000 
52-4256-0118 
Contact: Chairman, 
Northwest Institute for 
Historic Preservation. 216 
First Avenue South. No. 
402, Seattle, WA 98104 



Old Town Neighborhood 

Association 

FY 1977 

$14,445 

R70-42-144 

Contact: Acting Director, 

Old Town Neighborhood 

Association. 624 Old Town, 

Mankato. MN 56001 



Pittsburgh History and 
Landmarks Foundation 
FY 1977 
$14,450 
R70-42-39 
Contact: President, 
Pittsburgh History and 
Landmarks Foundation, The 
Old Post Office. Allegheny 
Square West, Pittsburgh, 
PA 15212 



Portage County Regional 

Planning Commission 

FY 1986 

$4,300 

86-4256-0025 

Contact: Director, Portage 

County Regional Planning 

Commission, 449 South 

Meridian Street, Ravenna, 

OH 44266 



To conduct "Landmarks Law at 
Twenty," a conference marking the cul- 
mination of New York Landmarks Pres- 
ervation Commission's observance of its 
twentieth anniversary. 



For a study of North Carolina vernacular 
design traditions. A videotape was pro- 
duced, and a book, Carolina Dwelling: 
Towards Preservation of Place in Cele- 
bration of the North Carolina Vernacu- 
lar Landscape, was published in 1978. 



To produce a textbook on maintaining 
the structural integrity of unreinforced 
masonry buildings, the predominant type 
of structure in American small towns and 
cities. 



To devise a preservation plan, including 
an inventory, policy recommendations 
and design guidelines for property own- 
ers, for the historic North Front Street 
area of Mankato, Minnesota. A work- 
shop notebook and a project report were 
issued. 



To document Pittsburgh's adaptive reuse 
activities in order to increase awareness 
among corporate, commercial, real estate 
and financial audiences of the aesthetic 
and economic benefits of reinvestment in 
older downtown buildings. A slide show, 
a book and an exhibition were produced. 



To encourage adaptive reuse of signifi- 
cant structures in Portage County, Ohio, 
by creating an inventory listing vacant 
structures and developing a handbook 
that explains the process of restoring a 
building. 



DESIGN FOR COMMUNITIES 21 



Pratter, S. Jerome 

FY 1981 

$8,000 

11-4215-121 

Contact: Attorney-at-Law, 

240 Linden Street, St. 

Louis, MO 63105 



Preiser, Wolfgang F. E. 

FY 1979 

$7,816 

91-4232-164 

Contact: 1 3304 Mountain 

Shadow, Albuquerque, NM 

87111 



Preservation Alliance of 

New Orleans 

FY 1983 

$20,000 

32-423000073 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Preservation Resource 

Center, 604 Julia Street, 

New Orleans, LA 70130 



Preservation League of New 

York State 

FY 1977 

$9,310 

R70-42-149 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Preservation League of New 

York State, 1 84 Washington 

Avenue, Albany, NY 12210 



Pry, Patrick William 

FY 1977 

$5,500 

R71-42-9N 

Contact: 1 538 West Street, 

Redding, CA 96001 



Region D Council of 

Governments 

FY 1977 

$7,500 

R70-42-150 

Contact: Commercial 

Development Planner, 

Region D Council of 

Governments, Executive 

Arts Building, Furman 

Road, Boone, NC 28607 



Restore, Inc. 

FY 1984 

$20,000 

42-4256-00006 

Contact: Project Director, 

Restore, Inc., 19 West 44th 

Street, New York, NY 

10036 



To examine means of utilizing local non- 
profit groups as keystones for revitalizing 
neighborhoods and to study the economic 
benefits of legal tools that encourage 
quality design. 



To research and prepare guidelines on 
the existing regulatory devices for con- 
trol of visual quality and compatibility in 
architecture. A forty-page report was is- 
sued. 



To conduct a competition for the design 
of new contemporary infill buildings on 
vacant lots along streets in six historic 
sections of New Orleans. 



To initiate a statewide technical assis- 
tance program on the reuse of surplus 
school buildings. An article entitled "So- 
lutions for Surplus Schools" was pub- 
lished. 



To undertake a survey documenting 
buildings of architectural and historical 
significance in Redding, California. 



To prepare an inventory of historic sites 
and structures in a seven-county region 
of northwestern North Carolina and to 
assist communities in obtaining historic 
designations and preservation funding. A 
preservation plan and book of photos 
documented the project. 



To launch a series of four model work- 
shops on state-of-the-art restoration and 
conservation technology. The courses 
were videotaped and transcribed for fu- 
ture use. 



Restore, Inc. 

FY 1985 

$25,000 

52-4256-0122 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Restore, Inc., 19 West 44th 

Street, Suite 1701, New 

York, NY 10036 



Restore, Inc. 

FY 1986 

$25,000 

86-4256-0088 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Restore, Inc., 19 West 44th 

Street, Suite 1701, New 

York, NY 10036 



Rothzeid, Bernard 

FY 1980 

$7,500 

01-4214-028 

Contact: 787 Carroll Street, 

Brooklyn, NY 11215 



San Diego State University 

Foundation 

FY 1981 

$21,245 

12-4250-036 

Contact: General Manager, 

KPBS-TV/FM, San Diego 

State University, San Diego, 

CA 92182 



Saratoga County Board of 

Supervisors 

FY 1978 

$4,100 

R80-42-152 

Contact: Saratoga County 

Supervisors, Municipal 

Center, Saratoga, NY 

12020 



Savannah Landmarks 

Rehabilitation Project 

FY 1983 

$10,000 

32-4230-00188 

Contact: Director, Savannah 

Landmarks Rehabilitation 

Project, RO. Box 8801, 

Savannah, GA 31412 



Scardino, Albert J. 

FY 1978 

$7,750 

R81-42-I8N 

Contact: RO. Box 8892, 

Savannah, GA 31402 



To produce five intensive workshops on 
state-of-the-art architectural restoration 
technology. Three videotapes 
documenting specific architectural pres- 
ervation procedures were also created. 



To produce three videotapes for educa- 
tional use showing Restore's procedures 
for preservation and maintenance of ma- 
sonry structures. 



To document the vernacular house of the 
island of Barbados — the chattel house — 
its history, design and construction meth- 
ods. A report on the research was pro- 
duced. 



To develop Urban Preserve, a documen- 
tary film on the concept of preservation. 
The film is divided into three parts: in- 
digenous architecture and preservation of 
historical continuity, livable urban den- 
sity and geographical and man-made bar- 
riers. 



To prepare a book on the county's his- 
toric sites and structures, entitled Sara- 
toga County Communities: An Histori- 
cal Perspective. The book was meant to 
increase local public awareness of the ar- 
ea's architectural heritage and the bene- 
fits of preserving it. 



For the Savannah Neighborhood Action 
Conference. The conference focused on 
the role of design quality and historic 
preservation in inner-city neighborhoods 
across the United States. Workshops 
demonstrated the challenges faced in the 
rehabilitation of Savannah's Victorian 
district. 



To produce a film describing the history 
of the South through the design of chim- 
neys — from Native American shelters to 
high-rise construction and nuclear cool- 
ing towers. 



22 CHAPTER ONE 



Schumacher, Thomas L. 
FY 1983 
$10,000 
31-4213-00158 
Contact: Architect, 533 
North First Street, 
Charlottesville, VA 22901 



Scott, Quinta 

FY 1981 

$9,000 

11-4213-230 

Contact: 5066 Westminster 

Place, St. Louis. MO 63108 



Sickels, Lauren B. 

FY 1982 

$10,000 

21-4213-108 

Contact: 1497 Carriage 

Lane, Rochester, MI 48063 



Smith, Bradley T. 

FY 1985 

$4,200 

51-4213-0151 

Contact: 409 East 49th 

Street. Savannah, GA 

31405 



Smith, Jennifer W. 

FY 1987 

$10,000 

87-4216-0135 

Contact: 26 Pearl Street, 

Apt. 2, New Haven, CT 

06511 



Spears, Beverly B. 

FY 1983 

$9,730 

31-4213-00161 

Contact: 423 West San 

Francisco Street, Santa Fe, 

NM 87501 



State Historical Society of 

Colorado 

FY 1977 

$16,000 

R7a42-164 

Contact: State Historical 

Society of Colorado, 

Colorado State Museum, 

200 14th Avenue, Denver, 

CO 80203 



For the "Palladio Variations," a slide 
show and narrative based on the premise 
that facades are a compositional issue re- 
lated to material, technology and cultural 
meaning independent of a building's in- 
ternal volume and function, a concept 
fundamentally opposite to the tenets of 
modern architecture. 



To prepare photographic materials and a 
manuscript documenting the diverse 
architectural styles along U.S. Route 66. 



To prepare a study of mortar in restora- 
tion and new design. The work is titled 
Mortars in Old Buildings and in Ma- 
sonry Conservation: A Historical and 
Practical Treatise. 



To research "tabby," a concrete-like ma- 
terial used in the construction of eight- 
eenth-century buildings in the South for 
which no satisfactory means of preserva- 
tion exists. 



To study the ornament of the Connecti- 
cut State Capitol, one of the finest exam- 
ples of high Victorian Gothic architec- 
ture in America. 



To conduct an architectural study of the 
metal-roofed adobe houses of northern 
New Mexico, a unique form of indige- 
nous architecture. A videotape and 
project report documented the work. 



To formulate design guidelines for devel- 
opment in historic districts throughout 
southern Colorado. An illustrated hand- 
book of the guidelines was published and 
a slide presentation created. 



State of Iowa, Division of 

Historic Preservation 

FY 1977 

$16,765 

R70-42-32 

Contact: Director, State of 

Iowa, Division of Historic 

Preservation, B-13 MacLean 

Hall, Iowa City, lA 52242 



Sun, Paul P 

FY 1979 

$5,000 

9M232-111 

Contact: 86 Bailey Road, 

Watertown, MA 02172 



Taylor, Crombie 
FY 1982 
$15,000 
21-4215-091 
Contact: Professor, 
University of Southern 
California, 5543 Village 
Green, Los Angeles, CA 
90016 



Texas Architectural 

Foundation 

FY 1982 

$15,000 

22-4250-239 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Texas Architectural 

Foundation, 1400 Norwood 

Tower, Austin, TX 78701 



Thomas, Mark W. 
FY 1983 
$5,000 

31-4212-00137 
Contact: 928 Port Street, 
New Orleans, LA 901 17 



Thomas, Richard C. 

FY 1979 

$5,000 

9M232-112 

Contact: 50 Lone Pine 

Road, Bloomfield Hills, Ml 

48013 



Tiemey, Joan D. 

FY 1987 

$10,000 

87^216-0134 

Contact: PO. Box 1 54550, 

Washington, DC 20003 



To initiate a program on conserving the 
rural landscape. The aim was to increase 
public interest in landscape preservation 
and maintenance. 



To document the vernacular architecture 
of China and its adaptability to the natu- 
ral environment. The project produced a 
series of slides and a report entitled The 
Canopy of Heaven and the Chariot of 
Earth. 



To continue research on the history of 
building: from the Hagia Sophia in an- 
cient Constantinople to the Sears Tower 
in Chicago. 



To complete the photodocumentary sec- 
tions of a book that focuses on the his- 
torical evolution of Texas architecture 
and urban planning. 



To research and document art deco ar- 
chitecture in the various regions of Loui- 
siana. 



To write and illustrate a series of mono- 
graphs on techniques of metalcrafting. 



To produce a videotape on recent efforts 
of scientists, architects and engineers to 
preserve and repair surfaces of historic 
buildings damaged by pollution. 



DESIGN FOR COMMUNITIES 23 



Town of Framingham 

FY 1984 

$10,000 

42-4231-00001 

Coniacl: Chairman, Board 

of Selectmen. Town of 

Framingham. Memorial 

Building, Framingham, MA 

01701 



Town of Washington Grove 

FY 1987 

$30,000 

87-4251-0096 

Contact: Mayor, Town of 

Washington Grove, RO. 

Box 216, Washington 

Grove. MD 20880 



Triangle J Council of 
Governments 
FY 1987 
$20,000 
87^251-0079 
Contact: Chairman, 
Triangle J Council of 
Governments, RO. Box 
1 2276, Research Triangle 
Park, NC 27709 



Trustees of Columbia 

University 

FY 1982 

$22,500 

22-4250-229 

Contact: Chairman. Historic 

Preservation, Columbia 

University. Low Memorial 

Library, Box 20, New York, 

NY 10027 



Trustees of the Swain 

School 

FY 1987 

$25,000 

87-4251-0121 

Contact: President, Trustees 

of the Swain School, 388 

County Street. New 

Bedford, MA 02740 



Trustees of the University of 

Pennsylvania 

FY 1983 

$37,245 

32-4252-00129 

Contact: University of 

Pennsylvania, 3457 Walnut 

Street, Philadelphia, PA 

19104 



To formulate concepts for the adaptive 
reuse of a surplus school through a 
collaborative process involving architects, 
landscape architects, town planners and 
residents. 



To produce a documentary about the de- 
sign of Washington Grove, Maryland, a 
town that has preserved much of its orig- 
inal character and quality of life. The sit- 
ing and original plan of 1873 have been 
key factors in the development and pres- 
ervation of the community. 



To produce a regional image plan to sus- 
tain and enhance the rich visual diversity 
of a six-county region in North Carolina. 
The region is anchored by the cities of 
Raleigh, Durham and Chapel Hill and 
knit together by a mosaic of small towns, 
suburban areas and rural landscapes. 



To produce a touring exhibit and cata- 
logue entitled Ruins and Revivals. The 
work documented the evolving character 
and form of America's deteriorating ur- 
ban areas. The exhibit opened in Sep- 
tember 1983 at the Urban Center in 
New York City. 



To support "Architectural Artisanry: 
Preservation by Design," a research re- 
port and symposium describing and de- 
fining the educational, professional and 
economic needs of craftspersons who 
work in the field of architecture. 



To produce The Metal Cornice — Yester- 
day, Today and Tomorrow, a report on 
the important implications of new design 
structures for urban housing conserva- 
tion. 



University of Maryland 
FY 1983 
$40,000 
32-4252-00127 
Contact: Comptroller, 
University of Maryland, 660 
West Redwood Street, 
Baltimore, MD 21201 



University of Wisconsin 

FY 1982 

$20,896 

22-4252-159 

Contact: Assistant to the 

Dean, University of 

Wisconsin. Department of 

Architecture, RO. Box 413. 

Milwaukee, WI 53201 



Vision, Inc. 

FY 1977 

$29,590 

R70-42-185N 

Contact: Director of Urban 

Design, Vision, Inc., 678 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

Suite 601, Cambridge, MA 

02139 



Webb. Michael F 

FY 1982 

$7,500 

21-4213-189 

Contact: Assistant Professor. 

Drexel University, 125 

Union Avenue, Bala 

Cynwyd, PA 19004 



Wells-Bowie, La Verne 

FY 1984 

$5,000 

41-4213-0127 

Contact: 619 62nd Street, 

Oakland, CA 94609 



Wiebenson. John 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R81-42-6N 

Contact: 1739 Connecticut 

Avenue, N.W, Washington, 

DC 20009 



Wesley, Richard H. 
FY 1986 
$5,000 
86-4213-0123 
Contact: University of 
Pennsylvania, Department 
of Architecture, 
Philadelphia, PA 19104 



To conduct an analysis of the often con- 
flicting viewpoints of residents of tourist 
neighborhoods and visitors who travel 
there. A report. Design in Familiar 
Places, studied two residential-tourist ar- 
eas in Baltimore. 



To identify the aesthetic forms and deco- 
rative features of buildings to help de- 
signers create new architecture that fits 
comfortably within historic settings. A 
report. Contextual Compatibility in Ar- 
chitecture, was produced. 



To research and prepare a guidebook 
showing the importance of preservation 
and enhancement of the visual environ- 
ment to community revitalization. 



To examine sgraffito, a facade decora- 
tion technique developed in Renaissance 
Italy that is relatively inexpensive and 
produces beautiful building decoration. 



To perform research on the indigenous 
rural architecture of the Sea Islands, lo- 
cated near Daufuskie Island, South Car- 
olina. Slides and a narrative summary 
documented the research. 



To research visual grandeur as a design 
element and a reinforcement of commu- 
nity identity in Washington, D.C., and 
outlying areas. A research report was 
submitted. 



To create a theoretical framework for de- 
signing alterations and additions to exist- 
ing buildings. The study drew from his- 
torical examples of building additions. 



24 CHAPTER ONE 



Wilson, H. Weber 

FY 1978 

$5,000 

R8I-42-38N 

Contact: 447 East Catherine 

Street, Chambersburg, PA 

17201 



World Monuments Fund, 

Inc. 

FY 1987 

$27,000 

87-4251-0027 

Contact: Executive Director, 

World Monuments Fund, 

Inc., 174 East 80th Street, 

New York, NY 10021 



Wyoming State Archives, 
Museum and Historical 
Department 
FY 1987 
$10,000 
87-4251-0008 
Contact: State Historic 
Preservation Office, 2301 
Central, Barrett Building, 
Cheyenne, WY 82002 



Yang, Hanford 

FY 1981 

$15,000 

11-4215-219 

Contact: Professor, Pratt 

Institute, 1 12 Prince Street, 

New York, NY 10012 



Zurier, Rebecca 

FY 1981 

$7,940 

1M213-112 

Contact: 59 Freeman 

Parkway, Providence, RI 

62906 



To develop reference materials on resi- 
dential stained glass from 1860 to 1920: 
a pictorial record, a historical outline of 
the stained-glass industry and a bibliog- 
raphy. A book entitled Great Glass in 
American Architecture: Decorative Win- 
dows and Doors before 1 920 was pub- 
lished by E.R Dutton in 1986. 



To produce a film documenting the re- 
search-restoration process and the tradi- 
tional crafts used in the Citadel, a monu- 
mental fortress in northern Haiti. The 
film was shown in conjunction with a 
photographic exhibition, Haiti: The First 
Black Republic and Its Monuments to 
Freedom. 



To produce a slide show and booklet to 
increase awareness among Wyoming resi- 
dents of the state's historic buildings and 
the benefits of preserving them. 



To research and document the wooden 
structures indigenous to the Pacific 
Northwest. 



For a survey of American fire station ar- 
chitecture showing the wide range of his- 
torical styles and demonstrating the sym- 
bolic, social and aesthetic meaning of 
public architecture. A book entitled The 
American Firehouse: An Architectural 
and Social History was published in 
1982. 



Historic Preservation Projects 

Restoration plans and reuse ideas for specific buildings, dis- 
tricts and neighborhoods. 



Abilene Preservation 

League 

FY 1987 

$25,000 

87-4251-0115 

Contact: President, Abilene 

Preservation League, 790 

Orange Street, Abilene, TX 

79601 



Animas Regional Planning 

Commission 

FY 1977 

$3,145 

R70-42-132 

Contact: Regional Planner, 

Animas Regional Planning 

Commission, 1911 North 

Main Street, Durango, CO 

81301 



Architects' Community 

Design Center 

FY 1980 

$10,000 

02-4254-045 

Contact: President, 

Architects' Community 

Design Center, 370 Orange 

Street, Newark, NJ 07107 



Center for Design Planning 

FY 1978 

$15,000 

R80-42-166 

Contact: Center for Design 

Planning, 1510 Hollins 

Street, Baltimore, MD 

21223 



Center for Building 

Conservation 

FY 1985 

$30,000 

52-4231-0084 

Contact: Treasurer, Center 

for Building Conservation, 

40 Dover Street, New York, 

NY 10038 



City of Charlotte 

FY 1977 

$9,600 

R70-42-1I6 

Contact: Central Area 

Development Coordinator, 

City of Charlotte, Charlotte, 

NC 28202 



To produce a design plan for the renova- 
tion of the eighty-year-old Grace Hotel 
in Abilene, Texas, converting it into a 
museum complex housing sections on 
fine arts, history and science, offices and 
commercial space. 



To design improvements to Narrow 
Gauge Avenue, a nine-block segment of 
a historic railroad route which passes 
through the downtown of Durango, Colo- 
rado. The project was documented in 
slides. 



To produce a feasibility study and pre- 
liminary plan for the adaptive use of the 
architecturally significant Borden Milk 
Plant overlooking downtown Newark, 
New Jersey. A feasibility report was is- 
sued. 



To establish an art deco historic restora- 
tion district in Old Miami Beach, an 
area containing 360 art deco struc- 
tures — the highest concentration of such 
buildings in the country. 



To perform a preservation study of St. 
Andrew's Episcopal Church in Harlem, 
built in 1873 and listed on the National 
Register of Historic Places. The aim was 
to create a model maintenance and re- 
pair program for religious properties of 
historical or architectural importance. 



To investigate alternate uses for older 
downtown commercial buildings in Char- 
lotte, North Carolina, and to undertake 
economic and structural feasibility stud- 
ies for the reuse of ten of these struc- 
tures. 



DESIGN FOR COMMUNITIES 25 



City of Columbus 
FY 1983 
$9,000 

32-4250^0029 
Contact: Director, 
Department of 
Development, City of 
Columbus, 140 Marconi 
Boulevard, Sixth Floor, 
Columbus, OH 43215 



City of Eagle 

FY 1977 

$5,000 

R7a42-119 

Contact: Liaison Officer, 

City of Eagle, General 

Delivery, Eagle, AK 99738 



City of Flint 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R7042-121 

Contact: Director, City of 

Flint, Department of 

Community Development, 

1 101 South Saginaw Street, 

Flint, MI 48502 



City of Franklin 

FY 1987 

$4,650 

87-4251-0108 

Contact: Mayor, City of 

Franklin, RO. Box 179, 

Franklin, VA 23851 



City of Haverhill 

FY 1977 

$7,500 

R70-42-I24 

Contact: City Planner, City 

of Haverhill, 4 Summer 

Street, Haverhill, MA 

01830 



City of Kansas City 
FY 1977 
$10,000 
R7042-125 
Contact: Historic 
Preservation Coordinator, 
City of Kansas City, One 
Civic Plaza, Kansas City, 
MO 66101 



City of Leadville 

FY 1978 

$20,000 

R80-42-102 

Contact: Gage Davis and 

Associates, Boulder, CO 

80461 



To design a manual, mailers, and posters 
for the program. Hilltop U.S.A.: History 
and Homes. The aim was to make the 
community aware of its potential and to 
reawaken feelings of pride through work- 
shops and oral-history interviews. A vid- 
eotape and report documented the 
project. 



To study the architectural history of four 
structures in the historic district of Ea- 
gle, Alaska, and to prepare design plans 
for their restoration. 



To prepare guidelines for restoration and 
preservation of the proposed Water 
Street historic district, adjacent to the 
central business district in Flint, Michi- 
gan. A poster and a report were prepared 
in conjunction with the project. 



To formulate design concepts for adapt- 
ing an old railroad depot (circa 1900) 
into a community museum. The depot's 
restoration was a focal point for the re- 
vitalization effort sponsored by Frank- 
lin's Main Street project. 



To conduct architectural and economic 
evaluations of the feasibility of recycling 
the city-owned Jacques/Pilling Block 
complex, an important assemblage of 
Queen Anne brick structures in down- 
town Haverhill, Massachusetts. 



To survey the Strawberry Hill neighbor- 
hood in Kansas City, Missouri. Several 
reports documented the physical and cul- 
tural definition of the neighborhood, and 
proposals to establish a historic district 
and a viable preservation ordinance were 
developed. 



To conduct design planning studies of 
streetscape improvements to aid in the 
rehabilitation of historic buildings along 
Harrison Avenue in Leadville, Colorado. 



City of Minneapolis 

FY 1978 

$5,000 

R80-42-I04 

Contact: Economic 

Development Assistant, City 

of Minneapolis, City Hall, 

Minneapolis, MN 55415 



City of Natchez 

FY 1985 

$23,100 

52-4231-0092 

Contact: Mayor, City of 

Natchez, PO. Box 1185, 

Natchez, MS 39120 



City of Ogden 

FY 1977 

$6,525 

R70-42-143 

Contact: City of Ogden, 

2650 Washington 

Boulevard, No. 105, Ogden, 

UT 84401 



City of Opa-Locka 
FY 1979 
$10,000 
92-4233-063 

Contact: City Manager, 777 
Sharazad Boulevard, Opa- 
Locka, FL 33054 



City of Thomasville 
FY 1983 
$15,000 
32-4230-00063 
Contact: Director, 
Department of Community 
Development, City of 
Thomasville, City Hall, 
Thomasville, GA 31792 



Clay, Phillip L. 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R71-42-I4N 

Contact: Assistant Professor, 

Department of Urban 

Studies and Planning, 

Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology, No. 7-341, 

Cambridge, MA 02138 



Comp, T Allan 

FY 1987 

$10,000 

87-4216-0051 

Contact: PO. Box 1 2932, 

SeaUle,WA 98101 



To undertake design and economic feasi- 
bility studies of the Grain Belt Brewery 
on the Mississippi River. The aim was to 
determine its reuse potential for office, 
commercial or hotel space. 



To develop preservation maintenance 
plans for five historic buildings owned by 
the city: two National Historic Land- 
marks used as house museums, the city 
hall, a senior citizens' center and a stor- 
age facility. 



To prepare restoration drawings and 
plans for examples of early commercial 
architecture in Ogden, Utah. The aim 
was to encourage property owners to ren- 
ovate or reuse buildings in a blighted 
area. A report, The 25th Street Master 
Plan, slides and a tape documented the 
effort. 



To prepare a conservation and revitaliza- 
tion plan to balance the old and the new 
in Opa-Locka, Florida, a new town built 
during the South Florida land boom of 
the 1920s. A townscape conservation and 
revitalization report was issued. 



To undertake a feasibility and concep- 
tual design study for the reuse of the 
railroad depot in Thomasville, Georgia. 
The depot is located on prime land adja- 
cent to the downtown revitalization area. 



To study the extent of urban neighbor- 
hood revitalization and the implications 
for preservation in the context of enlight- 
ened social goals. A report was issued, 
using case studies of neighborhoods in 
several cities. 



For a team of designers and visual artists 
to prepare restoration proposals for the 
National Historic Landmark district of 
Butte, Montana. 



26 CHAPTER ONE 



Cultural Council 

Foundation 

FY 1977 

$13,965 

R7(M2-130 

Contact: Chairman. 

Cultural Council 

Foundation/Landmarks 

Preservation Commission, 

1 500 Broadway, New York, 

NY 10036 



Cultural Council 

Foundation 

FY 1979 

$25,000 

92-4233-190 

Contact: Chairman, New 

York City Landmarks 

Preservation Commission, 

305 Broadway, New York, 

NY 10007 



Department of Arkansas 

Natural and Cultural 

Heritage 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R70-42-I88 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Department of Arkansas 

Natural and Cultural 

Heritage, Continental 

Building, Suite 500, Little 

Rock, AR 72201 



District of Columbia 

FY 1979 

$17,000 

92-4233-248 

Contact: Assistant City 

Administrator, District of 

Columbia, 1350 E Street, 

N.W., Room 409, 

Washington, DC 20004 



Ecumenical Social Action 

FY 1979 

$27,450 

92-4233-151 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Ecumenical Social Action, 

PO. Box 4, Jamaica, MA 

02130 



Erpf Catskill Cultural 

Center 

FY 1987 

$6,000 

87^251-0089 

Contact: President, Erpf 

Catskill Cultural Center, 

RO. Box 784, Route 28, 

Arkville, NY 12406 



To conduct a demonstration project for 
facade improvements on Court Street in 
Brooklyn's Cobble Hill historic district. 



To formulate architectural guidelines 
governing improvements to and renova- 
tions of landmark buildings in New York 
City. 



For coordinated design consultant ser- 
vices for a historic neighborhood revital- 
ization program operated by Neighbor- 
hood Housing Services of Little Rock, 
Arkansas. 



To prepare a concept plan for the White 
House precinct in Washington, D.C., 
emphasizing design and economic solu- 
tions for the development of Square 224 
and its three landmark buildings, the 
Keith Theater-Albee Building, the Na- 
tional Metropolitan Bank and Rhodes 
Tavern. 



To design and plan the redevelopment of 
the former Haffenreffer Brewery com- 
plex in Jamaica, Massachusetts, as a 
neighborhood center. 



For a design development plan to enable 
the Erpf Catskill Cultural Center to es- 
tablish a museum and folklife center in 
the Round Barn in Halcottsville, New 
York. The barn was built in 1885 and 
listed on the National Register of His- 
toric Places. 



Garcia Gomez, Jose 

FY 1981 

$5,000 

11-4213-090 

Contact: G.?.0. Box 1174, 

San Juan, PR 00936 



Goldblatt, Lawrence 

FY 1981 

$9,000 

1M2 13-224 

Contact: 4200 Mercier, 

Kansas City, MO 641 11 



To survey and inventory the buildings of 
historical and architectural value in the 
Old San Juan historic district. 



Hardy, Hugh G. 

FY 1982 

$15,000 

21-4215-164 

Contact: Partner, Hardy 

Holzman Pfeiffer and 

Associates, 275 Park 

Avenue South, New York, 

NY 10010 



Institute of Puerto Rican 

Culture 

FY 1978 

$30,000 

R80-42-174 

Contact: Director, 

Monuments and Historical 

Sites, Institute of Puerto 

Rican Culture, Apartado 

Postal4184, San Juan, PR 

00905 



Maine Maritime Museum 

FY 1979 

$15,000 

92^211-222 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Marine Maritime Museum, 

963 Washington Street, 

Bath, ME 04530 



National Building Museum 

FY 1978 

$17,000 

R80-42-126C 

Contact: Museum of the 

Building Arts Commission, 

1800 M Street, N.W, Suite 

400, Washington, DC 20036 



For a feasibility study on adaptive reuse 
of the properties of the Mutual Musi- 
cians' Foundation of Kansas City, Mis- 
souri. Among the properties is the Ar- 
mory, viewed as the keystone to the 
revitalization of the Vine historic district. 
A report documented the study. 



To conduct an architectural survey of 
the Old Executive Office Building in 
Washington, D.C. The aim was to de- 
velop recommendations for its restoration 
and renovation and to explore providing 
restricted public access to the building. 
A report was issued. 



To formulate plans and designs for the 
reuse of three historic structures in Old 
San Juan as government offices and civic 
cultural centers. 



For site and facility planning for the ren- 
ovation of the historic Percy and Small 
shipyard complex. The complex was in- 
tended for use by the Maine Maritime 
Museum. A report documented the 
plans. 



To continue planning for a national mu- 
seum of the building arts in Washington, 
D.C, and to circulate a feasibility study 
for the project among building arts pro- 
fessionals and federal officials nation- 
wide. 



DESfGN FOR COMMUNITIES 27 



National Building Museum 

FY 1979 

$17,500 

92-4236-263 

Contact: Committee for a 

National Museum of the 

Building Arts, 440 G Street, 

N.W„ Washington, DC 

20001 



National Building Museum 

FY 1981 

$40,000 

12-4221-147 

Contact: Director, National 

Building Museum, Pension 

Building, 440 G Street, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20001 



Newark Preservation and 

Landmarks Committee 

FY 1978- 

$10,000 

R80-42-167 

Contact: Chairman, Newark 

Preservation and Landmarks 

Committee, 35 James 

Street. Newark, N J 07102 



New York City Landmarks 

Preservation Foundation 

FY 1982 

$15,000 

22-4230-204 

Contact: Chairman, New 

York City Landmarks 

Preservation Foundation, 20 

Vesey Street, New York, 

NY 10007 



New York Landmarks 

Conservancy 

FY 1977 

$20,000 

R70-42-140 

Contact: New York 

Landmarks Conservancy, 

330 West 42nd Street, New 

York, NY 10036 



New York State Urban 

Development Corporation 

FY 1979 

$15,000 

92^233-261 

Contact: New York State 

Urban Development 

Corporation. 1 345 Avenue 

of the Americas, New York. 

NY 10019 



To continue research and planning in 
conjunction with the Pension Building. A 
feasibility study was generated that led 
to a Congressional resolution reserving 
the Pension Building as the site of the 
National Building Museum. A $5,500 
amendment, 92-4236-263.1, was made in 
1979. 



To initiate an expanded national cam- 
paign to further promote the National 
Building Museum and to hire additional 
staff. A $10,000 amendment, 12-4221- 
147.1, was made in 1981. 



To conduct a design and marketing study 
of Newark's derelict Broad Street Sta- 
tion and to investigate its reuse potential 
as a multiple-use facility. 



For a feasibility study and master plan 
for the restoration of shopfronts on Mon- 
tague Street in Brooklyn Heights, a main 
commercial thoroughfare in a National 
Register historic district. 



To conduct a study on the preservation 
and reuse of the landmark Federal Ar- 
chive Building. A feasibility report as- 
sessed its potential conversion to a mix- 
ture of commercial, residential and semi- 
public uses and evaluated funding 
arrangements. 



To undertake a feasibility study and to 
prepare designs for the adaptive reuse of 
the architecturally significant buildings 
located directly north of a proposed me- 
morial to Franklin D. Roosevelt on Roo- 
sevelt Island in New York City. 



Nichols State University 

FY 1977 

$20,000 

R70-42-14I 

Contact: Associate Professor 

of History, Nichols State 

University, Laurel Valley 

Village Project, Thibodaux, 

LA 70301 



Oysterville Restoration 

Foundation 

FY 1978 

$4,500 

R80-42-107 

Contact: Landscape 

Architect, Oysterville 

Restoration Foundation, Box 

98, Oysterville, WA 98641 



Research Foundation of the 

State University of New 

York 

FY 1987 

$30,000 

87-4251-0116 

Contact: Treasurer, 

Research Foundation of the 

State University of New 

York, RO. Box 9, Albany, 

NY 12201 



Save the Scott House 

FY 1977 

$4,900 

R70-42-I42 

Contact: Texas Heritage, 

Save the Scott House, 

Thistle Hill, 1504 

Pennsylvania Avenue, Fort 

Worth, TX 76104 



To conduct a preservation planning study 
of a nineteenth-century sugar manufac- 
turing and plantation village near 
Thibodaux, Louisiana. A report entitled 
Laurel Valley Village: A Rural Life 
Museum Preservation Proposal resulted. 



To formulate a master preservation plan 
for the Oysterville, Washington, historic 
district. One of the aims was to guide 
development of land parcels in and near 
the district by establishing guidelines for 
new construction. 



To conduct a national design competition 
for the deteriorating Buffalo Psychiatric 
Center complex, designed by H. H. 
Richardson and F. L. Olmsted. 



To identify buildings with reuse potential 
and to prepare preliminary design 
schemes as part of a project to promote 
adaptive reuse of buildings in Fort 
Worth's historic stockyards. A research 
survey report resulted. 




— «» - ~» 



St. Francis of Assisi Church in Ranchos de Taos, a fine example 
of Spanish Franciscan architecture, was among the historic adobe 
churches surveyed by the New Mexico Community Foundation. 



28 CHAPTER ONE 



Town Hall Foundation, Inc. 

FY 1980 

$10,000 

02-4230085 

Contact: Director, Town 

Hall Foundation, Inc., 123 

West 43rd Street, New 

York. NY 10036 



Town of West Bridgewater 

FY 1978 

$3,000 

R80-42-172 

Contact: Chairman, Historic 

Commission, Town of West 

Bridgewater, West 

Bridgewater, MA 02379 



Township of East Brunswick 

FY 1977 

$2,600 

R7a42-155 

Contact: Township of East 

Brunswick, One Jean 

Walling Civic Center, East 

Brunswick, NJ 08816 



Trust for Preservation of 

Cultural Heritage 

FY 1985 

$20,430 

52-4231-0096 

Contact: Secretary, Trust 

for Preservation of Cultural 

Heritage. 2655 Glendower 

Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 

90027 



University of Virginia Main 

Campus 

FY 1986 

$30,000 

86-4231-0071 

Contact: President, 

University of Virginia, Main 

Campus, PO. Box 9013, 

Charlottesville, VA 22906 



Vallejo Naval and Historic 

Museum 

FY 1980 

$5,000 

02-4230-102 

Contact: Director, Vallejo 

Naval and Historic 

Museum, 734 Marin Street, 

Vallejo, CA 94590 



To prepare a study on the long-range fu- 
ture of New York City's Town Hall, a 
sixty-year-old landmark acquired by the 
Town Hall Foundation. The study ad- 
dressed programming, management and 
audience development. 



To reconstruct a colonial waterwheel and 
to undertake related site improvements 
as part of revitalization efforts in West 
Bridgewater, Massachusetts. 



To advance preservation efforts for sev- 
enty historic structures in East Bruns- 
wick Township. The project involved 
documentation of structures, preparation 
of site and structural plans and develop- 
ment of ordinances promoting adaptive 
reuse. 



To prepare a feasibility study for the res- 
toration and adaptive reuse of the Ennis- 
Brown house. The structure was designed 
by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1924. 



To perform the first phase of a historic 
structures report for the buildings com- 
prising Thomas Jefferson's Academical 
Village at the University of Virginia. 
Three study reports were issued. 



To plan and design the renovation of a 
former city hall building listed on the 
National Register of Historic Places for 
use as a naval and regional history mu- 
seum in Vallejo, California. 



Virginia Polytechnic 

Institute and State 

University (VPI) 

FY 1982 

$4,000 

22-4250-157 

Contact: Associate Dean, 

Research Division, VPI, 340 

Burruss Hall, Blacksburg, 

VA 24061 



Virginia Polytechnic 

Institute and State 

University 

FY 1982 

$28,935 

22-4230-039 

Contact: Associate 

Professor, VPI, Architecture 

and Environmental Design, 

301 Burruss Hall, 

Blacksburg, VA 24061 



Vision, Inc. 

FY 1979 

$100,000 

92-4234-024 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Vision, Inc., 678 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

Cambridge, MA 02139 



Washington International 

School 

FY 1979 

$17,000 

92^233-195 

Contact: Director, 

Washington International 

School, 2735 Olive Street, 

N.W, Washington, DC 

20007 



Washington University 

FY 1979 

$11,560 

92-4233-196 

Contact: Urban Research 

and Design Center, 

Washington University, Box 

1054, St. Louis, MO 63130 



To print a booklet to accompany the 
Academy Street School, an exhibition il- 
lustrating the adaptive reuse potential of 
the Academy Street School in Salem, 
Virginia. The school was slated for demo- 
lition but has since been listed on the 
National Register of Historic Places. 



For a design study of the historically sig- 
nificant American Brewery Complex and 
the adjoining neighborhood in Baltimore, 
Maryland. The study identified ways of 
making the complex meet the East Balti- 
more neighborhood's cultural and social 
objectives. Slides and a report 
documented the project. 



To produce a film on the history of the 
Old Post Office in Washington, D.C., the 
first federal building to be managed un- 
der the Federal Public-Private Cooper- 
ative Use Act. A report developed film 
treatments for the Old Post Office. 



For a feasibility study, site analysis and 
participatory design process for the adap- 
tive use of the twenty-acre Tregaron Es- 
tate in Washington, D.C. The estate was 
proposed as a site for the Washington In- 
ternational School and for residential and 
recreational uses. Several reports were 
published. 



To devise a series of design and reuse al- 
ternatives for recycling the Cupples Sta- 
tion area in St. Louis, Missouri. 



DESIGN FOR COMMUNITIES 29 



Urban Design and Planning 

Urban design competitions, guidelines and planning tech- 
niques for large and small jurisdictions. 



Albuquerque Community 

Foundation 

FY 1987 

$15,500 

87-4251-0023 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Albuquerque Community 

Foundation, 6400 Upton 

Boulevard, N.E., 

Albuquerque, NM 87110 



American Institute of 

Architects Foundation, Inc. 

FY 1979 

$20,000 

92-4236-114 

Contact: Project Director, 

American Institute of 

Architects Foundation, Inc., 

1799 New York Avenue, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20006 



American Institute of 
Architects Foundation, Inc. 
FY 1981 
$10,000 
12-4221-168 

Contact: Director, Design 
and Environmental 
Program, American 
Institute of Architects 
Foundation, Inc., 1735 New 
York Avenue, N.W., 
Washington, DC 20006 



American Institute of 
Architects Foundation, Inc. 
FY 1981 
$20,000 
12-4250003 

Contact: Director, Design 
and Environmental 
Program, American 
Institute of Architects 
Foundation, Inc., 1735 New 
York Avenue, N.W., 
Washington, DC 20006 



American Institute of 

Architects Foundation, Inc. 

FY 1984 

$50,000 

42-4231-0066 

Contact: President, 

American Institute of 

Architects Foundation, Inc., 

1735 New York Avenue. 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20006 



To develop design guidelines governing 
exterior rehabilitation, new construction 
and improvements on historic Central 
Avenue in Albuquerque, a participant in 
the Main Street Center's Urban Dem- 
onstration Program. A report, Revitaliza- 
tion Through Design, was issued. 



To evaluate the Regional/Urban Design 
Assistance Team (R/UDAT) program, a 
project of the American Institute of Ar- 
chitects. The program has sent volunteer 
interdisciplinary teams of professionals to 
communities requesting assistance since 
1969. A report documented the study. 



To evaluate the Regional/Urban Design 
Assistance Team (R/UDAT) program 
and operations. The evaluation entailed 
study of various alternate organizing 
frameworks and potential expansion of 
the program's base of support. 



To prepare a publication on the effec- 
tiveness of the Regional/Urban Design 
Assistance Team (R/UDAT) program 
and the importance of public participa- 
tion in decision-making that shapes com- 
munity environment. A report and slides 
were produced. 



To encourage development of innovative 
programs by the 275 local chapters of 
the American Institute of Architects by 
offering small grants (from $500 to 
$3,000) to chapters. The granting pro- 
gram draws on the American Institute of 
Architects' 1984 theme, American Ar- 
chitecture and Its Public. 



American Planning 

Association 

FY 1981 

$20,000 

12-4221-135 

Contact: Assistant Director 

of Research, American 

Planning Association, 1313 

East 60th Street, Chicago, 

IL 60637 



American Planning 

Association 

FY 1985 

$12,992 

52-4256-0101 

Contact: Executive Director, 

American Planning 

Association, 1313 East 60th 

Street, Chicago, IL 60637 



American Planning 

Association 

FY 1987 

$18,700 

87-4251-0003 

Contact: Deputy Executive 

Director, American 

Planning Association, 1313 

East 60th Street, Chicago, 

IL 60637 



Appleyard, Donald 
FY 1980 
$5,000 
01-4210-030 
Grantee deceased 



Arizona Historical Society 

FY 1985 

$29,850 

52-4257-0017 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Arizona Historical Society, 

1242 North Central 

Avenue, Phoenix, AZ 85004 



Assist, Inc. 

FY 1979 

$5,000 

92-4233-059 

Contact: Project Director, 

Assist, Inc., 218 East Fifth 

South, Salt Lake City, UT 

84111 



Assist, Inc. 

FY 1982 

$1,650 

22-4250013 

Contact: Project Director, 

Assist, Inc.. 218 East Fifth 

South, Salt Lake City, UT 

84111 



To establish a national peer exchange 
network. The aim was to aid planners 
and officials in cities, small towns and 
rural communities in solving common 
planning and design problems by sharing 
firsthand experiences. 



To produce an illustrated design stan- 
dards manual for improved site planning 
for parking lots and parking structures in 
urban areas. One of the aims was to set 
forth design ideas that can be applied to 
existing parking lots as well as new facili- 
ties. A report entitled The Aesthetics of 
Parking documented the effort. 



For a manual and series of workshops on 
the effects of zoning bonus systems on 
urban design. The technique of granting 
a zoning variance beneficial to a devel- 
oper in return for the provision of a pub- 
lic amenity has been widely used, with 
positive and negative effects. 



To prepare graphic material for a book 
entitled Livable Streets. The book was 
published by the University of California 
Press in 1981. 



To conduct a national design competition 
to select an architect for the Central Ari- 
zona Museum of History. Slides and de- 
scriptive materials documented the com- 
petition. 



To develop prototypical design schemes, 
models and drawings for the visual and 
aesthetic improvement of a major com- 
mercial street in Salt Lake City, Utah. A 
report and pamphlet. West South Tem- 
ple, were produced. 



To distribute 500 additional copies of 
State Street. The handbook was pre- 
pared to help communities in Salt Lake 
City, Utah, plan for the design upgrad- 
ing of the commercial strip, a fiftecn- 
mile-long highway through the city. 



30 CHAPTER ONE 



Association of Collegiate 

Schools of Architecture 

FY 1982 

$10,000 

22-4230-192 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Association of Collegiate 

Schools of Architecture, 

1735 New York Avenue, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20007 



Atlanta Great Park 

Planning, Inc. 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R80-42-I56 

Contact: President, Atlanta 

Great Park Planning, Inc., 

612 Clifton Road, N.E., 

Atlanta, GA 30307 



Bakanowsky, Louis J. 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

91-4231-251 

Contact: 6 Parker Street, 

Lexington, MA 02173 



Balfour, Alan H. 
FY 1985 
$8,500 
5 M2 13-0047 
Contact: College of 
Architecture, Georgia 
Institute of Technology, 
Atlanta, GA 30332 



Ball State University 
FY 1984 
$40,800 
42-4255-0078 
Contact: Director, Ball 
State University, 2000 
University Avenue, Muncie, 
IN 47306 



Beinart, Julian 

FY 1981 

$5,000 

I M2 1 3-082 

Contact: Professor, 

Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology, Room 10-485, 

Cambridge, MA 02 139 



For a national collegiate competition fo- 
cusing on the urban design process and 
the integration of energy-conscious de- 
sign criteria. A report and slides 
documented the design charette. 



To formulate plans for redesigning a 
200-acre freeway right-of-way into a 
great park with commercial, residential 
and industrial uses. A report, The Great 
Park III Housing Study, was issued. 



To examine urban fringe areas and to de- 
velop guidelines, criteria and case study 
examples for middle-density buildings. A 
report entitled Exploration of Relational 
Field Buildings was produced. 



To study the architecture and urban de- 
sign of the rectangle of land surrounding 
the Leipziger Platz in Berlin from 1900 
to the present. A 250-page report exam- 
ines how politics and policy affect urban 
form in one of the greatest physical 
points of tension between the East and 
the West. 



To initiate a statewide program, Good 
Design/Good Business, consisting of a 
conference, publication and traveling ex- 
hibition. The aims were to provide design 
education to Indiana communities and to 
promote a higher level of design quality 
in Indiana products, environments and 
communications. 



To research the physical and symbolic 
form of eleven twin cities that lie on the 
Mexican-American border. The aim was 
to study the effects of intercultural rela- 
tions between developed and developing 
countries. 



Bender, Richard 

FY 1987 

$16,000 

87-4216-0155 

Contact: 804 Santa Barbara 

Road, Berkeley, CA 94707 



Boston Redevelopment 

Authority 

FY 1980 

$15,000 

02-4250-215 

Contact: Policy Planning 

Staff, Boston 

Redevelopment Authority, 

One City Hall Square, 

Boston, MA 02201 



Boston Redevelopment 

Authority 

FY 1985 

$30,000 

52^231-0018 

Contact: Director, Boston 

Redevelopment Authority, 

One City Hall Square, 

Boston, MA 02201 



Boston Society of 

Architects' Charitable 

Foundation 

FY 1987 

$38,000 

87-4251-0030 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Boston Society of 

Architects' Charitable 

Foundation, 305 Newbury 

Street, Boston, MA 021 15 



Bryan, Harvey J. 

FY 1981 

$5,000 

11-4213-085 

Contact: Department of 

Architecture, Massachusetts 

Institute of Technology, 77 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

Cambridge, MA 02139 



California Council, 

American Institute of 

Architects 

FY 1981 

$40,000 

12-4250-024 

Contact: California Council, 

American Institute of 

Architects, 315 14th Street, 

Oakland, CA 94612 



To evaluate the design review process, a 
tool widely used by cities, urban districts 
and neighborhoods to control and im- 
prove the quality of new buildings in 
their midst. 



To create a documentary on the effects 
of policy and planning decisions on the 
future of Boston. A $10,000 amendment, 
grant number 12-4250-9008, was made 
in 1981. 



To conduct an urban design study of 
Boston's Fort Point Channel area. The 
aim was to identify the design ele- 
ments — bridges, landforms, promontories 
and waterways — that give the area its 
unique character but which may be jeop- 
ardized by real estate speculation and 
development. 



To prepare a report entitled Boston Vi- 
sions — A Civic Design Agenda. The re- 
port addresses a variety of development 
and growth issues facing the city of Bos- 
ton and surrounding suburbs and recom- 
mends urban design policies. 



For a design methodology that incorpo- 
rates consideration of natural light into 
urban planning practices. The aim was to 
create criteria for determining how to 
use natural light in the design of energy- 
conserving urban environments. 



To create a traveling exhibition, entitled 
L.A. by L.A. The exhibit considered the 
unique environments within Los Angeles 
as prototypes of urban design in the 
United States. Planning for a design 
competition to develop theme portals for 
the exhibition was also initiated. 



DESIGN FOR COMMUNITIES 31 



Calthorpe, Peter 

FY 1987 

$10,000 

87-4216-0143 

Contact: 246 First Street, 

Suite 400, San Francisco, 

C A 94105 



Cantanese, Anthony James 

FY 1980 

$10,000 

0M213-162 

Contact: Dean, University 

of Wisconsin, Department 

of Architecture and Urban 

Planning, Milwaukee, Wl 

53201 



Cedro, Rico 

FY 1987 

$10,000 

87-4216-0131 

Contact: 14 Fairbanks 

Street, No. 1, Brookline, 

MA 02146 



Center for Design Planning 

FY 1981 

$20,000 

12-4230049 

Contact: Project Director, 

Center for Design Planning, 

3695 St. Gaudens Road, 

Coconut Grove, FL 33133 



Central Houston Civic 

Improvement, Inc. 

FY 1985 

$30,000 

52-4231-0019 

Contact: Chairman, Central 

Houston Civic 

Improvement, Inc., 2040 

Two Shell Plaza, Houston, 

TX 77002 



City of Akron 

FY 1978 

$20,000 

R8a42-38 

Contact: Director, City of 

Akron Department of 

Planning and Urban 

Development, Akron, OH 

44308 



To develop the concept of "the pedes- 
trian pocket": balanced, mixed-use areas 
within walking distance of light-rail lines 
implanted into suburbs. The concept 
would accommodate growth with mini- 
mal environmental impact. 



To study the urban design and planning 
of successful waterfront projects. A 
monograph examines the efforts of the 
National Science Foundation's Heritage 
Conservation and Recreation Service, the 
Milwaukee Lakefront design competition 
and projects in Venice, Italy. 



For an exhibition on New Haven's urban 
transformation during the latter part of 
the twentieth century. This is one of the 
best known demonstrations of urban re- 
newal in this period; however, its accom- 
plishments are deteriorating and its origi- 
nal aims misunderstood. 



To host a competition for innovative de- 
sign of street furniture. 



To prepare an urban design plan for cen- 
tral Houston that builds on the concept 
of places as art. The aim was to identify 
design projects to transform large down- 
town areas into visually exciting and vital 
environments. 



To formulate an urban design plan for 
Akron, Ohio, as part of a comprehensive 
planning process to guide the city's fu- 
ture development. A development guide 
was produced that recommends treat- 
ments for architecture, lighting, parking, 
signs and other urban elements. 



City of Burlington 

FY 1984 

$20,000 

42-4231-0018 

Contact: City of Burlington, 

City Hall, Burlington, VT 

05401 



City of Cambridge 
FY 1979 
$15,000 
92-4233-177 
Contact: Chief Urban 
Designer, City of 
Cambridge, 795 
Massachusetts Avenue, 
Cambridge, MA 02139 



City of Cave Spring 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R80-42-159 

Contact: Mayor, City of 

Cave Spring, RO. Box 375, 

Cave Spring, GA 30124 



City of Chandler 

FY 1983 

$29,700 

32-4230-00078 

Contact: Director of 

Planning, City of Chandler, 

200 East Commonwealth 

Avenue, Chandler, AZ 

85224 



City of Chicago 

FY 1986 

$40,000 

86-4231-0160 

Contact: Commissioner, 

City of Chicago, 

Department of Planning, 

121 North LaSalle Street, 

Room 1000, Chicago, IL 

60602 



City of Columbia 

FY 1987 

$84,576 

87-4251-0076 

Contact: City Manager, 

City of Columbia, RO. Box 

147, Columbia, SC 29217 



To hold charettes and workshops among 
designers, planners and citizens in order 
to draft long-range plans for the develop- 
ment of the waterfront, central business 
district and adjoining neighborhoods in 
Burlington, Vermont. A series of slides 
and a report, The Burlington Urban De- 
sign Study, were produced. 



For a facade and streetscape improve- 
ment program along Massachusetts Ave- 
nue in Cambridge. A booklet setting 
forth the design guidelines and review 
procedures for the Cambridge Facade 
Improvement Program was produced. 



To formulate an urban design plan for 
the central business district of Cave 
Spring, Georgia, and strategies for pro- 
tection of historic structures. Several re- 
ports were produced, including a master 
plan for the renovation of the 1 00-year- 
old Rolater Park. 



To host an urban design competition for 
the adaptive reuse of the historic town 
plaza in Chandler, Arizona. The plaza 
was built during the turn-of-the-century 
City Beautiful movement. 



To prepare an urban design plan to guide 
land use, landscaping, signs, public art 
and traffic flow along Chicago's historic 
boulevards. The twenty-two-mile system 
links several parks, the inner city and an 
array of culturally diverse neighbor- 
hoods. 



For a redevelopment plan and a regula- 
tory framework for the Congaree Vista 
area in Columbia, South Carolina. The 
area contains large amounts of underuti- 
lized property, a scenic riverfront and 
main street area, and is the object of 
development pressure. 



32 CHAPTER ONE 



City of Cumberland 

FY 1977 

$7,500 

R70-42-30 

Conlaci: Director of 

Communily Development, 

City of Cumberland, City 

Hall, Cumberland, MD 

21502 



City of Franklin 

FY 1983 

$4,625 

32-4230^0065 

Conlaci: City Manager. 

City of Franklin. PO. Box 

179, 207 W. Second 

Avenue, Franklin, VA 

23851 



City of Lincoln 

FY 1987 

$25,000 

87^251-0100 

Contact: Mayor, City of 

Lincoln, 555 South 10th 

Street, Lincoln, NE 68508 



City of Memphis 

FY 1977 

$25,000 

R70-42-9B 

Contact: Office of Policy 

Planning. City of Memphis, 

City Beautiful Commission, 

Memphis, TN 38103 



City of Norwalk 

FY 1987 

$40,000 

87-4251-0114 

Contact: Mayor. City of 

Norwalk. Norwalk 

Redevelopment Agency, 35 

South Main Street, South 

Norwalk, CT 06854 



City of Portland 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R70-42-194C 

Contact: Project 

Coordinator. City of 

Portland. 1700 S.W. Fourth. 

Portland, OR 97201 



To hire a design team to create and im- 
plement design controls for downtown 
Cumberland, Maryland. 



To coordinate the design of the major 
highway access route and entranceway to 
downtown Franklin through development 
of design sketches for the restoration of 
storefronts and commercial businesses. 
An urban design report was produced. 



To improve the design of open spaces in 
a thirty-six-block retail development in 
downtown Lincoln, Nebraska. The aim 
was to generate design concepts for link- 
ing indoor and outdoor spaces and for 
integrating new development into the ex- 
isting urban fabric. 



To design a central city pedestrian sys- 
tem linking activity centers in downtown 
Memphis and in surrounding residential 
neighborhoods. The focus was on design 
of small elements that contribute to vi- 
sual character: street lighting, landscap- 
ing, signs and street furniture. 



To support a feasibility study and design 
development of the central business dis- 
trict of Norwalk, Connecticut. The aims 
were to increase retail and residential 
density and provide public transportation 
facilities. 



To address design aspects of a revitaliza- 
tion effort in the St. John's business dis- 
trict of Portland, Oregon. The project in- 
cluded an analysis of security, 
remodeling, sign, parking and vegetation 
needs. A task force report and a building 
improvement workbook incorporating 
voluntary design guidelines were pro- 
duced. 



City of San Francisco 

FY 1977 

$17,000 

R70-42-156C 

Contact: Associate 

Professor. University of 

California. Department of 

Architecture. Berkeley, CA 

94720 



City of San Mateo 

FY 1977 

$13,000 

R70^2-13B 

Contact: City Planner. City 

of San Mateo, 330 West 

20th Avenue, San Mateo, 

CA 94403 



City of Terre Haute 

FY 1977 

$9,000 

R70-42-16B 

Contact: City Planner. City 

of Terre Haute, Department 

of Redevelopment. 417 

South Fifth Street. Terre 

Haute, IN 47807 



City of West Hollywood 
FY 1987 
$30,000 
87-4251-0110 
Contact: City Manager. 
City of West Hollywood, 
Office of City Management, 
861 1 Santa Monica 
Boulevard. West Hollywood. 
CA 90069 



City of Wilmington, 

Delaware 

FY 1977 

$30,000 

R70-42-17B 

Contact: Director, City of 

Wilmington, 1000 King 

Street, Room 358, 

Wilmington, DE 19801 



City of Wilmington, North 

Carolina 

FY 1977 

$17,300 

R70-42-63B 

Contact: Director of 

Planning, Wilmington 

Planning Commission, RO. 

Drawer 1810, Wilmington, 

NC 28401 



To prepare case studies demonstrating 
the effects of various design policies un- 
der residential zoning reform in San 
Francisco. 



To create a scheme clarifying and unify- 
ing the visual character of San Mateo's 
downtown core. A report. The San Ma- 
teo Downtown Beautification Design 
Study, was issued. 



For design, planning and promotion of a 
pedestrian walkway linking Indiana State 
University with the downtown, the city 
library and Farrington's Grove historic 
preservation district. 



To conduct an open international design 
competition for a civic center, part of a 
three-year urban design and building pro- 
gram in West Hollywood, California. 



For an evaluation of recently built pedes- 
trian areas in Wilmington, Delaware. A 
report on pedestrian malls and plazas 
was issued. It developed additional de- 
sign goals and a planning kit to extend 
and improve areas for pedestrian use in 
the city. 



To improve coherence of the visual set- 
ting in a historic 180-block area of Wil- 
mington, North Carolina, by formulating 
design recommendations and plans for 
demonstration projects. Design guide- 
lines were compiled in a thirty-five-page 
report. 



DESIGN FOR COMMUNITIES 33 



City of York 

FY 1977 

$12,100 

R70-42-18B 

Contact: Mayor, City of 

York, 50 West King Street, 

Box 509, York, PA 1 7405 



City-County Planning Board 
of Forsyth County and 
Winston-Salem 
FY 1977 
$24,190 
R70-42-3B 

Contact: Director, City- 
County Planning Board of 
Forsyth County and 
Winston-Salem, City Hall, 
Winston-Salem, NC 27102 



Commonwealth Council for 

Arts and Culture 

FY 1986 

$15,000 

86-4251-0185 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Commonwealth Council for 

Arts and Culture, RO. Box 

553 CHRB, Saipan, CM 

96950 



Conservation Foundation 
FY 1987 
$60,000 
87-4251-0167 
Contact: Officer for 
Development, Conservation 
Foundation, 1 250 24th 
Street, N.W., Suite 500, 
Washington, DC 20037 



Cook, Robert S., Jr. 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R81-42-45N 

Contact: 1 1 99 Park Avenue, 

Apt. 5C, New York, NY 

10028 



Cornell University 

FY 1979 

$28,910 

92-4212-145 

Contact: Assistant Director, 

Cornell University, Office of 

Sponsored Programs, 123 

Day Hall, Ithaca, NY 

14853 



To formulate plans and designs for open 
spaces in the twenty-one-block York his- 
torical and architectural review district. 
Pedestrian-oriented amenities planned for 
the area included signage, street furni- 
ture, pavings and plantings. A report, 
York Open Space, was issued. 



For a physical design plan to improve the 
visual relationship of major center city 
institutions and sites in Winston-Salem, 
North Carolina. The focus was on the de- 
sign of surface elements — pedestrian 
links, open spaces, street furniture and 
lighting. Two reports were issued. 



To create a five-year design arts pro- 
gram. The aim was to develop a design 
concept for the island so that buildings 
and spaces do not violate the island's 
beauty and are compatible with its cul- 
ture. 



To research critical issues in planning, 
preservation and urban design in Latin 
America in preparation for an interna- 
tional conference. 



For a publication on the functional quali- 
ties of downtown pedestrian environ- 
ments. A book entitled Zoning for 
Downtown Urban Design: How Cities 
Control Development was published in 
1980 by Lexington Books. It includes de- 
scriptions of how legal mechanisms can 
be used to influence the design of down- 
towns. 



To create a technical design-assistance 
program focusing on the growth and cul- 
tural patterns of small rural communities 
in upstate New York. 



Craig, Lois 
FY 1979 
$7,600 
PC 79-16 
Contact: Dean of 
Architecture and Planning, 
Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, 77 
Massachusetts Avenue, 
Room 7233, Cambridge, 
MA 02139 



Craig, Lois 

FY 1984 

$10,000 

41-4213-0130 

Contact: 607 West 

Michigan, Urbana, IL 

61801 



Dallas Institute of 

Humanities and Culture 

FY 1987 

$25,000 

87-4251-0099 

Contact: Codirector, Dallas 

Institute of Humanities and 

Culture, 2719 South Street, 

Dallas, TX 75201 



To issue a report recommending ways in 
which the Endowment's Design Arts Pro- 
gram can address federal design im- 
provement issues. 



Deasy, Cornelius M. 
FY 1978 
$10,000 
R8 1-42- ION 
Contact: 11100 Valley 
Spring Lane, North 
Hollywood, CA 91602 



De Bretteville, Peter 

FY 1986 

$7,300 

86-4213-0124 

Contact: 406 South Hill 

Street, Los Angeles, CA 

90014 



Delaware Valley Regional 

Information Corporation 

FY 1978 

$26,445 

R80-42-85 

Contact: Editor, Delaware 

Valley Regional Information 

Corporation, 3 Parkway, 

20th Floor, Philadelphia, 

PA 19102 



For research on the design of American 
suburbs. A videotape and several articles 
in Design Quarterly 32 documented sub- 
urban physical development — from the 
initial intentions of planners and original 
occupants to current perceptions and 
development patterns. 



For planning and design of a mass-transit 
system that addresses several needs: link- 
ing communities, creating an urban aes- 
thetic and moving traffic efficiently 
through the city. The system is part of a 
fifty-year urban design plan, which in- 
cludes a special visual treatment district 
and links the center city to the zoo and 
Fair Park. 



For a catalogue of human behavior in 
public places. A book entitled Designing 
Places for People: A Handbook on Hu- 
man Behavior for Architects. Designers 
and Facility Managers, was published in 
1985 (written by the grantee in collabo- 
ration with Thomas E. Lasswell). It in- 
cludes an analysis of the implications of 
behavioral preferences for design. 



To compare the original design concepts 
of eight California university campuses 
with their current status. The aim was to 
analyze the formal and informal shifts 
from the original concepts. 



To perform research for a four-part se- 
ries on improving the quality of life in 
the urban centers of the Delaware Val- 
ley, including Philadelphia, Trenton and 
Camden. 



34 CHAPTER ONE 



Denver Civic Ventures 
FY 1983 
$15,000 
32^230-00079 
Contaci: President, Denver 
Civic Ventures, 511 16th 
Street Mall, Suite 200. 
Denver, CO 80202 



Di Domenico, John A. 
FY 1983 
$9,500 

31-4213-00143 
Contact: 225 Lafayette 
Street, Suite 605. New 
York, NY 10012 



Dueno. Lina M. 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R8M2-29N 

Contact: Calle E, No. F-1 

Villa Verde. Guaynabo, PR 

00657 



Dunlop, Beth E. 

FY 1987 

$10,000 

87-4216-0149 

Contact: 585 1 North Bay 

Road, Miami Beach, FL 

33140 



Economic Development and 

Industrial Corporation of 

Boston 

FY 1987 

$10,000 

87-1251-0015 

Contact: Director. Economic 

Development and Industrial 

Corporation of Boston. 38 

Chauncy Street. Ninth 

Floor, Boston, MA 02111 



Educational Facilities 

Laboratories, Inc. 

FY 1979 

$15,000 

92-4233-069 

Contact: President, 

Educational Facilities 

Laboratories, Inc., 850 

Third Avenue, New York, 

NY 10022 



To host a national competition for the 
design of a park above an underground 
garage. The site is adjacent to Denver's 
civic center, and the goal was to provide 
a link between the park and the Colo- 
rado State Capitol. 



To conduct an urban design study and to 
complete a report. The Reuse of Urban 
Infrastructure: The West Side Rail Line 
in New York City. The report identifies 
alternative designs for an abandoned ele- 
vated rail spur on Manhattan's West 
Side. 



To test the applicability of the Depart- 
ment of Housing and Urban Develop- 
ment's Minimum Property Standards to 
local building practices. The results were 
compiled in a 1 30-page report. 



For a collection of critical essays examin- 
ing major urban design and planning is- 
sues in south Florida: the impact of 
large-scale development on downtowns, 
neighborhoods, public parks, plazas, 
bridges and vistas. 



To develop a model for the design of in- 
dustrial parks in urban neighborhoods. 
The aim was to integrate public art, 
landscaping, graphic design and indus- 
trial facilities into an appealing environ- 
ment for private industry and the urban 
public. 



To undertake an action program to dem- 
onstrate a variety of reuse options for 
surplus schools. A report on surplus 
schools in New York City was issued. 



Environmental Education, 

Inc. 

FY 1978 

$2,849 

R80-42-170 

Contact: Secretary. Tampa 

Community Design Center, 

Environmental Education, 

Inc., PO. Box 1832, 

Tampa, FL 33601 



Eseman. Christopher J. 

FY 1987 

$10,000 

87-4216-0047 

Contact: 40 Alfred Street. 

Manchester. NH 03104 



Fairmount Park Arts 

Association 

FY 1986 

$35,850 

864256-0093 

Contaci: Trustee, Fairmount 

Park Arts Association, 1530 

Locust Street, Suite 3A, 

Philadelphia, PA 19102 



Fels, Patricia T. 

FY 1987 

$8,600 

87-4216-0140 

Contaci: 30002 Issaquah- 

Fall City Road, Fall City, 

WA 98024 



Ferebee, Ann 

FY 1985 

$10,000 

51-4213-0060 

Contaci: Institute for Urban 

Design, PO. Box 105, 

Purchase, NY 10577 



Flats Oxbow Association 

FY 1985 

$28,300 

52-4231-0088 

Contact: Chairman, Flats 

Oxbow Association, 1 283 

Riverbed Street, Cleveland, 

OH 441 13 



Foundation for Architecture 

FY 1984 

$25,700 

42-4257-0023 

Contaci: Board of Directors, 

Foundation for 

Architecture, 1 1 7 South 

17th Street, Philadelphia, 

PA 19103 



To design a prototype mobile park and 
movable components: seating, planters 
and canopies. The aim was to improve 
vacant lots in Tampa's central business 
district prior to full-scale redevelopment. 



To formulate urban design guidelines to 
integrate the riverfront, the millyard 
along the river and the adjacent commer- 
cial district of Manchester, New Hamp- 
shire. 



For Light up Philadelphia, a study of the 

potential for creative urban lighting. The 
project was intended to encourage design 
excellence, to increase public perception 
of safety, to encourage mobility and en- 
joyment of the city's resources after dark 
and to highlight the city's sculptural and 
architectural treasures. A report 
documented the project. 



To examine the planning processes used 
in Seattle, Washington, and Bologna, It- 
aly. Bologna's innovative regulatory plan 
has become a model for much of Europe 
and has possible applications to Seattle's 
development. 



To prepare a book of case studies on the 
rehabilitation of older industrial cities 
through the reuse of abandoned railway, 
industrial and riverfront land. 



For a planning study to help guide future 
development of the Cleveland Flats, a 
riverfront section including historic ware- 
houses and facilities. A report. The Flats 
Oxbow Long-Range Development Plan, 
documented the study. 



To host a one-stage design competition 
seeking innovative solutions to relieve the 
blank-wall facades of the U.S. Mint in 
Philadelphia. The aim was to make the 
block-long building more accommodating 
to pedestrians. 



DESIGN FOR COMMUNITIES 35 



Fulton, William B. 
FY 1986 
$10,000 
86-4213-0106 
Contact: 8306 Wilshire 
Boulevard, Suite 111, 
Beverly Hills, CA 90211 



Georgia Tech Research 

Institute/Georgia Institute 

of Technology 

FY 1986 

$37,500 

86-4252-0184 

Contact: Contract Officer, 

Georgia Tech Research 

Institute/Georgia Institute 

of Technology, Atlanta, GA 

30332 



Gnoflb, John J. 

FY 1981 

$4,500 

11-4212-215 

Contact: 277 Hook Street, 

Jersey City, NJ 07302 



Grange, James A. 

FY 1979 

$5,000 

91-4232-102 

Contact: 258 West Main 

Street, Babylon, NY 11702 



Greater Jamaica 

Development Corporation 

FY 1981 

$9,814 

12-4230-170 

Contact: Urban Designer, 

Greater Jamaica 

Development Corporation, 

161-04 Jamaica Avenue, 

Jamaica, NY 11432 



Greater Jamaica 
Development Corporation 
FY 1985 
$15,000 
52-4231-0091 
Contact: Executive Vice- 
President, Greater Jamaica 
Development Corporation, 
90-04 16th Street, Jamaica, 
NY 11432 



To research the impact of real estate 
development on the design of cities. The 
aim was to raise public consciousness 
about the tendency to judge building 
projects by the amount of revenue gener- 
ated to the exclusion of considerations of 
their contributions to the urban environ- 
ment. 



To analyze the elements that help sustain 
good design at the urban level. The aim 
was to study how six cities (Boston, Balti- 
more, Seattle, Houston, Savannah and 
Decatur, Georgia) have built constituen- 
cies to promote quality design ideas. 



For a study of Paulus Hook, a largely 
residential section of Jersey City's oldest 
waterfront area. A design analysis and 
implementation plan formulated alterna- 
tives to impending changes arising from 
adjacent developments projects. 



To perform a case-study analysis of resi- 
dential, office and retail spaces in order 
to show the relationship of quality design 
to appraised value. 



To work with the General Services Ad- 
ministration in the preliminary stages of 
its design competition for the million- 
square-foot Social Security Administra- 
tion headquarters building. A report enti- 
tled The Potential for New Retail and 
Public Space Facilities was produced. 



To create an architectural lighting instal- 
lation to play on the surface of a large, 
blank wall of a ten-story 1929 building. 



Greater Southwest 

Development Corporation 

FY 1978 

$15,000 

R80-42-163 

Contact: Project Director, 

Greater Southwest 

Development Corporation, 

6253 South Western 

Avenue, Chicago, IL 60636 



Gutman, Robert 

FY 1985 

$5,000 

51-4213-0057 

Contact: 7 1 1 Murray 

Avenue, San Luis Obispo, 

CA 



Halpern, Kenneth S. 

FY 1978 

$7,000 

R81-42-3N 

Contact: 250 West 24th 

Street, No. 6E, New York, 

NY 10011 



Harris, Charles 

FY 1980 

$7,500 

01-4210-034 

Contact: 4)1 Gund Hall, 

Harvard University, 

Cambridge, MA 02138 



Hartford Architecture 

Conservancy 

FY 1980 

$12,000 

02-4254-049 

Contact: Director, Planning 

and Design, Hartford 

Architecture Conservancy, 

1 2 Lewis Street, Hartford, 

CT 06103 



Hatch, C. Richard 

FY 1987 

$10,000 

87-4216-0136 

Contact: 1 2 Engle Street, 

Suite 104, Englewood, NJ 

07631 



Heder, Lajos S. 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R71-42-53N 

Contact: Moore Heder, 806 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

Cambridge, MA 02139 



To create an idea bank to provide archi- 
tectural planning assistance to merchants 
in the Chicago Lawn/ Marquette Park 
area. The goal was to devise strategies 
for revitalization of underutilized com- 
mercial buildings. Two reports on the 
project were issued. 



For a design analysis of San Luis Obispo, 
California, a small town on the verge of 
a development boom. The goal was to 
create design guidelines fostering com- 
patible development and public educa- 
tion activities illustrating the importance 
of retaining local character. A video and 
a report were produced. 



For a book on urban design and down- 
towns that includes case studies of nine 
diverse American cities and documenta- 
tion of their urban design policies. 



To research for a handbook on site de- 
sign and construction data. A videotape 
and narrative summary were produced. 



For an analysis of pedestrian activity in 
downtown Hartford. The aim was to for- 
mulate recommendations for more hu- 
mane design and management of public 
facilities and spaces. 



To develop a systematic approach to im- 
proving inner-ring neighborhoods — indus- 
trial suburbs built around the turn of the 
century that surround the cores of Amer- 
ican cities. 



To perform research for a book on oppor- 
tunities for recycling downtown streets. 
The aim was to examine urban design 
plans for auto-restricted zones in five cit- 
ies. 



36 CHAPTER ONE 



Henry Gallery Association 

FY 1982 

$7,500 

22^250^49 

Contact: Director, Henry 

Art Gallery, Henry Gallery 

Association, University of 

Washington, Seattle, WA 

98195 



Hirsch, David L. 

FY 1980 

$10,000 

01-4210-227 

Contact: 1 1 West 57th 

Street, New York, NY 

10019 



Institute of Puerto Rican 

Culture 

FY 1981 

$10,000 

12-4230-246 

Contact: Project Director, 

Institute of Puerto Rican 

Culture, Apartado Postal 

4184, San Juan, PR 00905 



Institute for Urban Design 

FY 1980 

$17,000 

DCA 80-40 

Contact: Director, Institute 

for Urban Design, Main 

PO. Box 105, Purchase, 

NY 10577 



Institute for Urban Design 

FY 1982 

$20,000 

22-4250-053 

Contact: Director, Institute 

for Urban Design, 

Architecture and Urban 

Studies, State University of 

New York at Purchase, 

Main PO. Box 105, 

Purchase, NY 10577 



Institute for Urban Design 

FY 1984 

$22,540 

42-4254-0092 

Contact: Institute for Urban 

Design, State University of 

New York at Purchase, 

Main Post Office, Box 105, 

Purchase, NY 10577 



To publish The Shaping of a Downtown: 
Seattle Plans. The book documents Seat- 
tle's recent urban planning history and 
accompanied an exhibition on urban de- 
sign in Seattle. 



To produce a report analyzing the effects 
of urban congestion on the pedestrian 
environment in New York City. 



To evaluate urban codes as viable devel- 
opment options for cities, as in the 
Puerta de Tierra area near Old San 
Juan, and to develop a coherent architec- 
tural and urban model. 



To transcribe tapes of the discussions on 
design and planning issues that took 
place at the conference. Great Cities of 
the World, in September 1980. 



To produce three special volumes of Ur- 
ban Design International magazine. The 
topics covered were zoning and zoning 
tools, ethnic conflict resolution and his- 
toric preservation, and change in cities in 
the 1980s. 



To support the work of the Federal Con- 
struction Council, a division of the Na- 
tional Academy of Sciences. The coun- 
cil's goals were to improve the design, 
construction and operation of federal fa- 
cilities and to promote adaptive reuse of 
federal buildings. 



Irwin-Sweeny-Miller 
Foundation 
FY 1984 
$30,000 
42-4257-0020 
Contact: President, Irwin- 
Sweeny-Miller Foundation, 
PO. Box 808, Columbus, 
OH 47202 



Issacs, Mark A. 

FY 1980 

$4,895 

01-4212-154 

Contact: 605 Jarvis Lane, 

Louisville, KY 50207 



Kansas State University of 

Agriculture and Applied 

Science 

FY 1987 

$30,000 

87-4251-0025 

Contact: Controller, Kansas 

State University of 

Agriculture and Applied 

Science, Anderson Hall, 

Manhattan, KS 66506 



Knowles, Ralph L. 

FY 1984 

$15,000 

41-4213-0115 

Contact: 2334 Kenilworth 

Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 

90039 



Lapiroff, Jerome S. 

FY 1981 

$9,000 

11-4213-228 

Contact: 642 Alcatraz 

Avenue, Apt. 302, Oakland, 

CA 94609 



Liskamm, William H. 

FY 1980 

$10,000 

01-4213-079 

Contact: 1 9 Olive Drive, 

San Rafael, CA 94901 



For a design competition to generate 
ideas for a surface parking lot in down- 
town Columbus, Indiana. The aim was to 
make the parking lot less of an eyesore 
and on a par with the caliber of corpo- 
rate and public architecture in the city. 
A book entitled Carscape: A Parking 
Handbook, was published in 1988 (writ- 
ten by Catherine Miller). 



For design and planning services for the 
inner-city residents of Phoenix Hill, a 
blighted neighborhood in Louisville, Ken- 
tucky. The aims were to create a housing 
strategy to rehabilitate existing sound 
buildings and guide new infill construc- 
tion to maintain the historic nineteenth- 
century fabric. 



For the Bruce R. Watkins Drive Interim- 
Use Project. The project involved the 
creation of a design program and plans 
for temporary uses and improvements 
along the road corridor under construc- 
tion. Citizens participated in the design 
charette, and many of Kansas City's lo- 
cal artists, architects and landscape ar- 
chitects contributed to the project. 



For research for a book that explores the 
concept of orderly urban transformation 
and its links to the creative human pro- 
cesses of learning and growth. Case stud- 
ies of rural, suburban and urban commu- 
nities ranging from northeastern Ohio to 
Los Angeles were made. 



To develop a post-occupancy evaluation 
of the municipality of Freemont, Califor- 
nia. The aims were to gauge Freemont's 
existing condition, general plan and de- 
sign concepts and strategies first intro- 
duced in 1962. 



To document the design competition for 
the Fort Mason master plan, including a 
description of the competition process 
and the procedures selected. 



DESIGN FOR COMMUNITIES 37 



Lower Manhattan Cultural 

Council, Inc. 

FY 1978 

$30,000 

R80-42-90N 

Contact: Lower Manhattan 

Cultural Council, Inc., 15 

State Street, New York, 

NY 10004 



Lowertown Redevelopment 

Corporation 

FY 1981 

$25,000 

12-4230-067 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Lowertown Redevelopment 

Corporation, 400 Sibley 

Street, St. Paul, MN 55101 



Maryland National Capital 

Park and Planning 

Commission 

FY 1980 

$15,000 

02-4250-124 

Contact: Chief, Maryland 

National Capital Park and 

Planning Commission, 8787 

Georgia Avenue, Silver 

Spring, MD 20907 



Massachusetts Council on 

the Arts and Humanities 

FY 1985 

$45,000 

52-4256-0112 

Contact: Associate Director, 

Massachusetts Council on 

the Arts and Humanities, 80 

Boylston Street, Boston, 

MA 021 16 



Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology 

FY 1983 

$47,857 

32-425(M)0039 

Contact: Director, Film and 

Video Section, 

Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology, 275 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

Building N51-115, 

Cambridge, MA 02139 



Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology 

FY 1987 

$15,000 

87-4251-0084 

Contact: Director, Office of 

Sponsored Research, 

Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology, 77 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

Cambridge, MA 02139 



To produce a film on the Washington/ 
Tribeca area in lower Manhattan. The 
aim was to combine a historical view of 
the area with an examination of the role 
of artists as a dynamic force in the 
growth of neighborhoods. 



To develop an energy-efficient urban de- 
sign plan using a section of downtown St. 
Paul as the test area. The study consid- 
ered land use, traffic and visual form; an 
evaluation of solar access; estimates of 
costs required to achieve energy effi- 
ciency and a feasibility study. 



To assess existing urban design guide- 
lines, to write a resource guidebook for 
communities and to conduct site visits 
and seminars on design guidelines. 



To collaborate with the Massachusetts 
Department of Public Works in a series 
of workshops, training seminars and 
presentations led by bridge designers and 
design education professionals. A manual 
entitled Bridge Design Aesthetics and 
Developing Technologies was produced. 



To produce an hour-long documentary 
film entitled New Orleans in Transition. 
The film covers the planning and urban 
design process used in New Orleans in 
the period preceding the 1984 World's 
Fair, and it provides a record for urban 
designers and public officials of how a 
city copes with inevitable planning con- 
flicts. 



To research and write a series of articles 
on the influence of designers on the con- 
temporary city — its perception, concep- 
tion, change and public art. 



Memphis State University 
FY 1983 
$15,000 
32-4230-00066 
Contact: Associate 
Professor, Memphis State 
University. Graduate 
Department of Planning, 
Johnson Hall, No. 226, 
Memphis, TN 38152 



Miller, David A. 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R71-42-55N 

Contact: Architects Hawaii, 

Ltd., 190 South King 

Street, No. 300, Honolulu, 

HI 96813 



Milwaukee County War 

Memorial, Inc. 

FY 1982 

$22,000 

22-4230-202 

Contact: Managing 

Director, Performing Arts 

Center, 929 North Water 

Street, Milwaukee, Wl 

53202 



Michigan Architectural 

Foundation 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

92-4233-072 

Contact: Michigan 

Architectural Foundation, 

553 East Jefferson, Detroit, 

MI 48226 



Mississippi State University 

FY 1980 

$20,000 

02-4250-223 

Contact: Dean, School of 

Architecture, Mississippi 

State University, Mississippi 

State, MS 39762 



Mississippi State University 

FY 1981 

$20,000 

12-4250-010 

Contact: Dean, School of 

Architecture, Mississippi 

State University, Mississippi 

State, MS 39762 



For a feasibility study on reestablishing a 
trolley system in downtown Memphis. 
The aim was to design a system that con- 
nects isolated areas of the city's historic 
districts with other commercial centers 
in Memphis. The feasibility study report 
is entitled Streetcar Trolleys and Re- 
vitalization of Urban Centers. 



To study the planning and architectural 
design of mass-transit facilities in the 
United States and other countries. The 
purpose was to research and document 
transit design issues relevant to the de- 
sign of a new fixed-rail rapid-transit sys- 
tem in Honolulu. A report documented 
the study. 



To host an urban design competition for 
the outdoor areas adjacent to the Mil- 
waukee Performing Arts Center. The 
aim was to visually integrate numerous 
elements: the center's facades and 
grounds, an adjoining parking structure, 
the Peck Pavilion, the Milwaukee River 
walkways and Marquette Park. 



To prepare a master plan for the down- 
town Detroit waterfront. The aims were 
to incorporate a balance of commercial, 
residential, industrial and recreational 
functions and to emphasize human-scale 
development. 



For a design charette and workshop seek- 
ing solutions blending quality design 
goals and the need to intensify retail 
space utilization. Three reports, includ- 
ing The Productivity of Retail Space: 
New Design Solutions, were produced. 



To hold a charette on the design of new 
facilities. The aim was to address the 
need of merchandise retailers to achieve 
major increases in the productivity of re- 
tail space — pressures brought on, in part, 
by increasing energy, real estate and con- 
struction costs. 



38 CHAPTER ONE 



Mississippi Stale University 
FY 1982 
$10,000 
22-t250-233 
Coniaci: Professor, 
Mississippi State University, 
School of Architecture, RO. 
Drawer AQ. Mississippi 
State, MS 39762 



Mississippi State University 

FY 1983 

$29,880 

32-423000067 

Contact: Associate Dean. 

Architecture. Mississippi 

State University. School of 

Architecture, RO. Drawer 

AQ, Mississippi State, MS 

39762 



Montana Arts Council 

FY 1982 

$2,870 

22^250-234 

Contact: Chairman, City 

Spirit Steering Committee, 

1 280 South Third Street 

West, Missoula. MT 59801 



Morris, Ellen K. 

FY 1982 

$5,000 

2M213-180 

Contact: Architectural 

Designer, Daniel Mann 

Johnson Mendenhall, 9941 

Young Drive, Beverly Hills, 

C A 90212 



Mouris, Frank R 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R8M2-16N 

Contact: 741 South Curson 

Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 

90036 



Muniak, Dennis C. 

FY 1982 

$9,600 

21-4213-182 

Contact: Assistant Professor, 

University of Rhode Island, 

31 Warwick Road, 

Watertown, MA 02172 



To edit and print papers given at the sec- 
ond Chautauqua symposium on change 
and tradition in the American small 
town, and to prepare The Small Town as 
an Art Object for a second printing. 



To identify strategies for accommodating 
the inevitable growth of Madison, Missis- 
sippi, while respecting the community's 
goal of maintaining its small town iden- 
tity. A videotape and report on the com- 
munity were produced. 



To edit videotape footage documenting 
the Missoula urban design competition. 
The process included an American Insti- 
tute of Architects' planning team, public 
meetings and an on-site design charette. 
An overall plan for downtown revitaliza- 
tion resulted. 



To produce a graphic analysis of three 
types of public buildings: town halls, 
public libraries and municipal art muse- 
ums. 



To create a trilogy of animated films 
documenting urban design in the amuse- 
ment areas on New York City's Coney 
Island. 



To explore the process surrounding the 
planning decisions that controlled the lo- 
cation and construction of the Buffalo 
campus of the State University of New 
York. The process concentrated on archi- 
tectural and site design but gave little at- 
tention to the campus's impact on the 
growth and quality of development in the 
metropolitan area. 



Municipal Art Society 

FY 1978 

$30000 

R8O42-105 

Contact: Municipal Art 

Society, 30 Rockefeller 

Plaza, New York, NY 

10020 



Municipal Art Society 

FY 1981 

$25,000 

12-4221-144 

Contact: Municipal Art 

Society, 457 Madison 

Avenue, New York, NY 

10022 



Municipal Art Society 

FY 1983 

$25,000 

32-4250-00112 

Contact: Deputy Director, 

Municipal Art Society, 457 

Madison Avenue, New 

York, NY 10022 



Municipal Art Society 
FY 1984 
$60,000 
42^257-0070 
Contact: President, 
Municipal Art Society, 457 
Madison Avenue, New 
York, NY 10022 



Municipal Art Society 
FY 1987 
$60,000 
87-4251-0007 
Contact: President, 
Municipal Art Society, 457 
Madison Avenue, New 
York, NY 10022 



Muschamp, Herbert, M. 

FY 1985 

$10,000 

5M2I3-0148 

Contact: 1 14 MacDougal 

Street, New York, NY 

10012 



For a project undertaken in collaboration 
with the Metropolitan Transit Authority 
to demonstrate rehabilitation possibilities 
for New York subway stations. A report 
entitled Adopt a Station was produced. 



To build a broad base of support for the 
Society's Urban Center by holding pub- 
lic events in urban design, architecture, 
landscape architecture, planning, interior 
design and preservation. A $25,000 
amendment, grant number 22-4250- 
9144.1, was awarded in 1982. 



For the first year of a three-year series of 
urban design exhibits addressing the de- 
sign consequences of public policy re- 
garding air rights, landmark properties, 
cultural districts, public plazas and zon- 
ing and other topics. A video and other 
materials documented the project. 



To conduct a design competition for the 
old Times Tower site on Times Square in 
New York City. The purpose was to pro- 
vide designers with an opportunity to in- 
form the public about the reuse or pres- 
ervation of this site before final decisions 
were made. A videotape and a report on 
the project were issued. 



For a national competition for design and 
development along Manhattan's Lower 
West Side waterfront. The area has been 
the object of a divisive, decade-long 
struggle. The aims were to solicit an ar- 
ray of new proposals and provide a fo- 
rum for representatives of different 
neighborhoods and competing interests. 



For a study of Battery Park City. The 
design of the community represents a 
transition from modern to post-modern 
architecture and was the result of 
collaboration among planners, architects, 
sculptors, government and private devel- 
opers. 



DESIGN FOR COMMUNITIES 39 



National Academy of 

Sciences 

FY 1984 

$15,000 

42^253-0091 

Contact: Advisory Board on 

the Built Environment, 

National Academy of 

Sciences, 2101 Constitution 

Avenue, N.W., Washington, 

DC 20418 



National Trust for Historic 

Preservation 

FY 1982 

$34,700 

22-4250-144 

Contact: National Main 

Street Center, National 

Trust for Historic 

Preservation, 1785 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20036 



National Trust for 

Historical Preservation 

FY 1983 

$5,000 

32-4250-00114 

Contact: Neighborhoods 

Program, National Trust for 

Historic Preservation, 1785 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

N.W, Washington, DC 

20036 



National Trust for Historic 

Preservation 

FY 1984 

$20,000 

42-4231-0029 

Contact: President, National 

Trust for Historic 

Preservation, 1785 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20036 



Neighborhood Design 

Center, inc. 

FY 1979 

$11,000 

92-4233-124 

Contact: Project Director, 

Neighborhood Design 

Center, Inc., 22 East 25th 

Street, Baltimore, MD 

21218 



To support the work of the Federal Con- 
struction Council, which seeks to im- 
prove the design, construction and opera- 
tion of federal facilities and to promote 
the adaptive reuse of existing federal 
buildings. Two reports, Design Criteria 
for Federal Buildings and Use of Com- 
puter Software for Buildings, were pro- 
duced. 



To create materials providing technical 
information on storefront design and up- 
per-story conversions for housing and of- 
fice use. The materials were intended for 
development officials seeking to commu- 
nicate basic design issues to merchants, 
property owners and city officials. An 
audiovisual presentation. Keeping Up 
Appearances, and two newsletters were 
produced. 



To publish two training manuals for the 
National Main Street Center on the re- 
vitalization and management of existing 
urban business districts through public- 
private partnerships. The manuals are 
entitled Urban Demonstration Program 
and Urban Training Program. 



For the design and development phase of 
the three-year Urban Main Street Dem- 
onstration Program, including formula- 
tion of the program, design and imple- 
mentation of the application process and 
production of training manuals. 



To provide technical assistance for the 
renovation of empty or unused buildings 
and lots in the Baltimore metropolitan 
area. The Neighborhood Design Center 
staff and professional volunteers in ar- 
chitecture, planning and design provided 
consultation services. Slides and a report 
illustrated the program. 



New Haven Foundation 

FY 1984 

$15,000 

42-4231-0022 

Contact: Executive Director, 

New Haven Foundation, 

One State Street. New 

Haven. CT 06510 



New York City Department 

of Cultural Affairs 

FY 1986 

$28,850 

86-4231-0077 

Contact: Commissioner, 

New York City Department 

of Cultural Affairs, 2 

Columbus Circle, New 

York, NY 10019 



New York Foundation for 

the Arts 

FY 1982 

$30,000 

22-4250-146 

Contact: Director, Film 

Program, New York 

Foundation for the Arts, 5 

Beekman Street, New York, 

NY 10036 



Northeastern University 
FY 1981 
$4,000 
12-4230-153 
Contact: Senior Vice- 
President, Northeastern 
University, 360 Huntington 
Avenue, Boston, MA 021 1 5 



North of Market Planning 

Coalition 

FY 1985 

$20,000 

52-4231-0094 

Contact: Executive Director, 

North of Market Planning 

Coalition, 295 Eddy Street, 

San Francisco, CA 94102 



Okamoto, Rai T 

FY 1981 

$15,000 

11-4215-218 

Contact: Director of 

Planning, City of San 

Francisco, 38 Calhoun 

Terrace, San Francisco, CA 

94133 



To devise design guidelines for the re- 
development of the Ninth Square area of 
downtown New Haven, a blighted area 
that contains New Haven's highest con- 
centration of nineteenth- and early twen- 
tieth-century structures. Slides and a re- 
port on sign and streetscape guidelines 
documented the project. 



For design and implementation of a pro- 
gram to integrate archeology into ar- 
chitecture, landscape planning and de- 
sign of capital construction projects. 



To complete Hell's Kitchen Chronicle, a 
film tracing the evolution of New York 
City's west side neighborhood of Clinton 
from farmland, to industrial slum, to 
transportation center, to home for vary- 
ing immigrant populations. The film 
highlights the adaptations to physical 
form made throughout this process. 



For professional consulting services for 
the design of a new central library facil- 
ity and for a design competition. 



To conduct an urban design study of po- 
tential housing sites and typical housing 
designs for the Tenderloin area of San 
Francisco. The aim was to devise meth- 
ods of remedying urban displacement. 



To create a film analysis of two high- 
density developments: La Defense in 
Paris and Shinjuku in Tokyo. 



40 CHAPTER ONE 



Otis Art Institute of Parsons 

School of Design 

FY 1984 

$50,000 

42-4257-0113 

Contact: Acting 

Administrator, Otis Art 

Institute, 2401 Wilshire 

Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 

90057 



Oregon Coast Council of 

the Arts 

FY 1987 

$21,500 

87-4251-0093 

Contact: President, Oregon 

Coast Council of the Arts, 

RO. Box 1315, Newport, 

OR 97365 



Parley, Michael L. 

FY 1981 

$5,000 

11-4213-101 

Contact: 42 West 83rd 

Street, New York, NY 

10024 



Partners for Livable Places 

FY 1981 

$70,000 

CA 81-33 

Contact: Senior Associate, 

Partners for Livable Places, 

1429 21st Street, N.W., 

Washington, DC 20036 



Partners for Livable Places 
FY 1983 
$30,000 
32-425(M)0181 
Contact: Senior Vice- 
President, Partners for 
Livable Places, 1429 21st 
Street, N.W., Washington, 
DC 20036 



Partners for Livable Places 

FY 1984 

$16,000 

42-4255-0015 

Contact: President, Partners 

for Livable Places, 1429 

21st Street, N.W., 

Washington, DC 20036 



To conduct a national one-stage compe- 
tition to develop concepts for the expan- 
sion of the institute and for the enhance- 
ment of its immediate surroundings in 
central Los Angeles. 



To develop a master plan for the rec- 
lamation of Lincoln City, a strip on the 
Oregon coast where congestion and com- 
mercial concentration have blighted a 
landscape that contains vistas of ocean, 
lakes, rivers and mountains. 



To continue research for a book on the 
ways in which New York City has been 
physically designed and formed by di- 
verse forces present since its begin- 
nings — why it looks and functions as it 
does and how this came to be. 



For a study of the costs and benefits of 
incorporating special design consider- 
ations and arts programs into transporta- 
tion systems. 



For research on design alternatives for 
parking structures. Multiuse projects in- 
cluding parking lots, innovative manage- 
ment techniques for parking places and 
animation techniques were investigated 
in the United States and abroad. 



To produce an audiovisual presentation 
entitled "City Assets." The subject of 
the presentation is Partners for Livable 
Places' Economics of Amenity Program, 
which explores the relationship between 
the arts, architecture, public administra- 
tion and public planning and a city's 
overall plan. 



Partners for Livable Places 

FY 1984 

$50,000 

42-4255-0087 

Contact: President, Partners 

for Livable Places, 1429 

21st Street N.W., 

Washington, DC 20036 



Passonneau, Joseph R. 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R71-42-23N 

Coma«. 3015 Q Street, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20007 



Passonneau, Joseph R. 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R71-42-58N 

Contact: 3015 Q Street, 

N.W, Washington, DC 

20007 



Pittsburgh History and 
Landmarks Foundation 
FY 1977 
$9,800 
R70-42-147 
Contact: President, 
Pittsburgh History and 
Landmarks Foundation, Old 
Post Office Museum, One 
Landmark Square, 
Pittsburgh, PA 15212 



President and Fellows of 

Harvard College 

FY 1987 

$25,000 

87-4251-0162 

Contact: Associate Dean, 

Administration, Holyoke 

Center, Fourth Floor, 1350 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

Cambridge, MA 02138 



Project for Public Spaces 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R70-42-172 

Contact: President, Project 

for Public Spaces, 875 

Avenue of the Americas, 

New York, NY 10001 



To publish The Economics of Amenity: 
Community Futures and Quality of Life, 
a work assessing the economic value of 
urban amenities. The book is written for 
communities attempting to stimulate eco- 
nomic growth through quality-of-life im- 
provements. 



To produce a report and slide show fo- 
cusing on the use of energy, public tran- 
sit and urban lands in Washington, D.C. 



To publish a summary of the report. 
Central Washington Transportation and 
Civic Design Study, for distribution to 
visitors attending the Streets of Washing- 
ton exhibition. An audiovisual presenta- 
tion was also created. 



To assess the physical and socioeconomic 
impact of the adaptive use of the Pitts- 
burgh & Lake Erie railroad complex on 
the surrounding neighborhoods. A report 
on the project developed design options 
and cost estimates. 



To study an undocumented area of urban 
design, the middle landscape of Ameri- 
can cities: urban-suburban areas charac- 
terized by commercial subdevelopments, 
nondescript buildings, high levels of 
automobile use and the absence of public 
identity. 



To conduct research on pedestrian ame- 
nities in downtown malls. Through ob- 
servation of pedestrian behavior in exist- 
ing malls, criteria for design, selection 
and placement were developed. The 
project resulted in a handbook. Design- 
ing Effective Pedestrian Improvements 
in Business Districts, published by the 
American Planning Association in 1982. 



DESIGN FOR COMMUNITIES 41 



Project for Public Spaces, 

Inc. 

FY 1979 

$16,932 

92-4234-232 

Contact: Project for Public 

Spaces, Inc., 875 Avenue of 

the Americas, New York, 

NY 10001 



Prudon, Theodore H. M. 

FY 1977 

$5,000 

R71-42-32N 

Contact: 205 East 73rd 

Street, New York, NY 

10021 



Public Technology, Inc. 

FY 1981 

$14,625 

12-4250-179 

Contact: Project Manager, 

Public Technology, Inc., 

1301 Pennsylvania Avenue, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

10004 



Regents of the University of 

California, Berkeley 

FY 1983 

$15,000 

32-4230-00077 

Contact: Project Director, 

University of California, 

Sponsored Projects Office, 

Mil Wheeler Hall, 

Berkeley, CA 94720 



Research Foundation of the 

City University of New 

York 

FY 1981 

$15,000 

12-4250-033 

Contact: Senior Associate, 

Research Foundation of the 

City University of New 

York, 33 West 42nd Street, 

New York, NY 10036 



Rodriguez, Roland V, 

FY 1983 

$5,000 

31-4212-00168 

Contact: 815 BriarclifT, San 

Antonio, TX 78213 



To conduct an analysis of the Depart- 
ment of Housing and Urban Develop- 
ment complex in Washington, D.C. A re- 
port proposed ways of rendering its 
public spaces more useful and attractive 
by increasing activities and amenities. 



To research and develop guidelines on 
adapting historic buildings for use as ho- 
tel and lodging facilities for use by cor- 
porations, local governments and commu- 
nity groups. 



For an exhibition, Design for Moving 
People, held at the Municipal Art Soci- 
ety. The exhibit highlighted public trans- 
portation facilities that are 
architecturally distinguished and that 
successfully incorporate the arts. 



To conduct a design-build competition 
for the National Mathematical Sciences 
Research Institute at the Berkeley cam- 
pus. A documented record of the design- 
build process was produced as well as an 
evaluation of the results. 



For the production of a book and slide 
program by the Center for Human Envi- 
ronments. The materials proposed strate- 
gies for evaluating public space needs 
and sketch the dimensions of socially 
successful public space design and man- 
agement. 



To produce an audiovisual presentation 
entitled "Urban Fact and Fantasy: The 
City Observed and Imagined." The work 
focuses on San Antonio and Austin, 
Texas, and stresses the relationship of ur- 
ban aesthetics to architecture and the 
development of cities. 



Schwartz, Frederic D. 
FY 1983 
$5,000 

31-4212-00006 
Contact: Director, New 
York Office, Venturi, 
Rauch & Scott Brown, 426 
Greenwich Street, New 
York, NY 10014 



Scribner, Ruth 

FY 1981 

$8,519 

C81-9 

Contact: 2409 Third Street, 

North, Arlington, VA 22201 



Shanor, Rebecca 

FY 1983 

$10,000 

31-4213-00160 

Co/Kflcr- 510 West 110th 

Street, No. 1 2A, New York, 

NY 10025 



Sidener, Jack T. 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R71-42-33N 

Contact: University of 

Washington, Architecture 

Department, Seattle, WA 

98195 



Society for Commercial 

Archeology 

FY 1981 

$30,000 

12-4250-037 

Contact: Society For 

Commercial Archeology, c/ 

Building Conservation 

Technology, RO. Box 

24032, Nashville, TN 37202 



Soleri, Paolo 

FY 1981 

$8,500 

11-4213-109 

Contact: 6433 Doubletree 

Road, Scottsdale, AZ 85253 



State of Alaska, Alaska 

Growth Policy Council 

FY 1977 

$20,000 

R70-42-1 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Arts Alaska, Inc., 429 D 

Street, Suite 310, 

Anchorage, AK 99509 



To research and design dramatic outdoor 
lighting for civic spaces, historic struc- 
tures and skyscrapers, making use of new 
lighting technologies. An audiovisual 
presentation entitled "City Lights" was 
produced. 



To prepare an application brochure, pro- 
cess submissions, arrange panels, publica- 
tions and awards ceremonies for the De- 
partment of Transportation's Design 
Awards Program. 



To research proposals for numerous 
never-realized projects in New York City 
(bridges, monuments, parks, buildings, 
streets and transportation systems) and 
the reasons for their failure. A manu- 
script and an article, both entitled The 
City That Never Was, were produced. 



To produce workshops, a questionnaire 
and guidebook based on Recycling 
Streets, a guide to successful neighbor- 
hood improvement. 



To develop a publication on the everyday 
American landscape, interpreting the 
environments of the home, suburbia and 
downtown, and examing the way these 
typical places express cultural values and 
shared meanings. 



To document the development of the 
Arcosanti project, an experimental new 
town. A paperback book, Arcosanti, was 
produced. 



To convene an assembly, Alaska Urban 
Design 11, to serve as a public forum for 
review of design determinants for a new 
Alaskan capital city. The results of the 
meeting were issued in a report entitled 
Design Determinants for a New Capital 
City and other publications. 



42 CHAPTER ONE 



State of Alaska 

FY 1978 

J 15.000 

R8a42-154 

Contact: Chief, Planning 

and Classification. Alaska 

Division of Lands. 323 East 

Fourth Avenue. Anchorage. 

AK 99501 



State of Arkansas 

FY 1979 

$3,000 

92-4233-060 

Contact: Administrator. 

Capital Zoning District 

Commission. Continental 

Building. Suite 500. 100 

Main Street. Little Rock. 

AR 72201 



State of New York 

Metropolitan Transportation 

Authority 

FY 1979 

$17,750 

92-4212-046 

Contact: New York 

Metropolitan Transportation 

Authority, 2 Lafayette 

Street. Room 2300. New 

York. NY 10007 



Stem, Robert A. M. 

FY 1983 

$15,000 

31-4215-00174 

Contact: Principal, Robert 

Stern Architects, 200 West 

72nd Street, New York, NY 

10023 



Suffolk County Public 

Works 

FY 1983 

$10,000 

32-423000090 

Contact: Commissioner, 

Suffolk County Department 

of Public Works, Veterans 

Memorial Highway, North 

Complex, Hauppage, NY 

11788 



Tarr. Jashina Alexandra 
FY 1977 
$10,000 
R71-42-47N 
Grantee deceased 



To incorporate urban design concepts 
into statewide land planning by studying 
the experiences of other cities and by 
creating demonstration models for urban 
design, a land management program and 
a series of community presentations. 



To produce guidelines and begin develop>- 
ment of an urban design plan for the 
capital district. The plan included an 
architectural analysis of the existing 
environment and identification of pre- 
ferred sites for future projects. 



To research and create designs to reju- 
venate twelve New York City subway 
stations as part of the observance of the 
system's Diamond Jubilee. A report, The 
Underground City, was produced. 



To perform research on the metropolitan 
suburb in America between 1850 and 
1940 — to determine the extent of their 
realization and their current state of re- 
pair. 



To conduct a two-stage national design 
competition for a multi-million-dollar 
court complex in Suffolk County, New 
York. 



To evaluate and compare conservation 
policies in the U.S. Virgin Islands, 
Puerto Rico and other Caribbean islands. 
A report entitled A Collaborative Pres- 
ervation Strategy for the Caribbean was 
produced, and a briefer version was pub- 
lished by Partners for Livable Places. 



Texas Tech University 

FY 1980 

$28,917 

02-4230-101 

Contact: Professor of 

Architecture. Texas Tech 

University, Department of 

Architecture, Lubbock, TX 

79404 



Thorsesen, A. Robert 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R81-42-27N 

Contact: 100 Kensington 

Road, Portsmouth, NH 

03801 



Town of Crested Butte 

FY 1979 

$20,000 

92-4233-192 

Contact: Director of 

Planning, RO. Box 39. 

Crested Butte. CO 81224 



Town of Friars Point 

FY 1978 

$15,000 

R80-42-171 

Contact: Mississippi State 

University. PO. Box 2394. 

Mississippi State, MS 

39762 



Town of Leesburg 

FY 1986 

$34,100 

86-4257-0179 

Contact: Town Manager. 

Town of Leesburg, 1 5 West 

Market Street, PO. Box 88, 

Uesburg, VA 22075 



Townscape Institute 

FY 1983 

$27,004 

32^250-00182 

Contact: President. 

Townscape Institute, 2 

Hubbard Place, Cambridge, 

MA 02138 



To produce a report entitled A Strategic 
Planning Design for the Border City of 
Eagle Pass, Texas as part of an inter- 
university research project between stu- 
dents from Texas Tech University and 
the Universidad Autonoma de Coahuila, 
Mexico. 



To evaluate the extent to which various 
police powers have made a qualitative 
difference in the visual character of com- 
munities. 



To produce design guidelines for the 
Crested Butte, Colorado, historic district. 
The approach used to create the guide- 
lines involved neighborhood design meet- 
ings to develop citizens' understanding of 
the dynamics and management of 
growth. 



For planning and design services for the 
town of Friars Point in the Mississippi 
Delta. Full citizen participation in the 
planning and design process was a pri- 
mary consideration. 



To conduct a national design competition 
for a new municipal government center. 
The purpose is to consolidate all adminis- 
trative and legislative functions of the 
town government that have been housed 
in three different locations. A town plan 
was also produced. 



To produce design and planning alterna- 
tives to the development of commercial 
franchise strips along the entrance high- 
ways to towns and cities across the na- 
tion. The aim was to describe techniques 
for creating a sense of place in highway 
corridors. 



DESIGN FOR COMMUNITIES 43 



Tribeca Community 

Association 

E^ 1987 

$175,900 

87^251-0078 

Contact: President, Tribeca 

Community Association, 

434 Greenwich Street, New 

York, NY 10013 



Tucker County Commission 

FY 1986 

$15,000 

86-4256-0061 

Contact: President, Tucker 

County Commission, Tucker 

County Courthouse, 

Parsons, WV 26287 



University of California 

FY 1980 

$25,000 

02-4250-1 10 

Contact: Professor of Urban 

Design, University of 

California, Mil Wheeler 

Hall, Berkeley, CA 45221 



University of California, Los 

Angeles 

FY 1987 

$27,776 

87-4251-0058 

Contact: Contracts and 

Grants Officer, University 

of California, Los Angeles, 

405 Hilgard Avenue, Los 

Angeles, CA 90024 



University of Miami 
FY 1986 
$25,000 
86-4256-0082 
Contact: Director, 
Sponsored Programs, 
University of Miami, PO. 
Box 248106, Coral Gables, 
FL 33124 



University of Minnesota 
FY 1978 
$7,710 
R80-42-123C 
Contact: Director, 
University of Minnesota, 
Continuing Education in 
Public Policy, 2642 
University Avenue, St. Paul, 
MN 55114 



To develop a plan for the public spaces 
of Tribeca, a wholesale and commercial 
area undergoing rapid change and sub- 
ject to intense development pressure. The 
aims were to preserve the area's unique 
historic character and protect its current 
designation as a mixed-use area, through 
a process involving local organizations 
and residents. 



To provide design assistance in the re- 
building of several communities in 
Tucker County, West Virginia, that were 
heavily damaged by flooding in Novem- 
ber 1985. A committee representing Par- 
sons, Hendricks, Hambleton and St. 
George was established to redesign these 
rural communities while preserving their 
historical and small town character. 



To support the efforts of the Institute for 
Urban and Regional Development to 
raise public consciousness and create a 
basis for assessing major choices for the 
future development of downtown San 
Francisco. A conservation and develop- 
ment plan was produced. 



To create an exhibition documenting the 
design competition for Los Angeles's 
Phoenix Municipal Center. The selection 
process was a model of maintaining de- 
sign quality through democratic proce- 
dures involving citizens, government and 
the private sector. 



To computerize the new zoning code of 
Seaside, Florida, and to make it available 
to all municipalities as an example of a 
simple and efi'ective method of guiding 
growth and reconstruction. 



To hold an international conference on 
the topic of enhancing the livability of 
Minneapolis during the winter months. 
Articles on the conference appeared in 
the local press. 



University of Minnesota of 

Minneapolis/St. Paul 

FY 1986 

$31,900 

86-4256-0180 

Contact: Assistant Director, 

Office of Research, 

University of Minnesota of 

Minneapolis/St. Paul, 1919 

University Avenue, St. Paul, 

MN 55104 



University of Tennessee 

FY 1983 

$17,050 

32-4250-00045 

Contact: Dean of Research, 

University of Tennessee, 

School of Architecture, 

Knoxville, TN 37996 



To produce a half-hour film on the work 
of urban designer Gordon Cullen and his 
humanistic approach to urban design. 
Cullen's works marked the beginning of 
a movement to make our urban places 
more livable. 



University of Washington 
FY 1987 
$20,000 
87-4251-0010 
Contact: Director, Grants 
and Contract Services, 
University of Washington, 
Seattle, WA 98195 



University of Wisconsin, 

Milwaukee 

FY 1978 

$25,000 

R80-42-108 

Contact: Urban Design 

Consultant, University of 

Wisconsin, Milwaukee, PO. 

Box 413, Milwaukee, Wl 

53201 



University of Wisconsin, 

Milwaukee 

FY 1985 

$50,000 

52-4257-0033 

Contact: Assistant to the 

Dean, University of 

Wisconsin, Milwaukee, RO. 

Box 340, Milwaukee, Wl 

53201 



University of Wisconsin, 

Milwaukee 

FY 1987 

$20,000 

87-4251-0031 

Contact: Associate Dean of 

Research, University of 

Wisconsin, Milwaukee, PO. 

Box 413, Milwaukee, Wl 

53201 



To produce a traveling exhibition and 
catalogue on the Tennessee Valley 
Authority's architectural and design 
projects. These include town planning, 
housing, community development and 
parks and engineering achievements. The 
catalogue, entitled Built for the People 
of the United States, was published by 
the University of Tennessee. 



To study whether wide roads are essen- 
tial to traffic safety and efficiency. The 
aim was to balance the needs of motor- 
ists with those of other users — pedestri- 
ans, cyclists and children. 



To develop design proposals for a 1 45- 
acre site — once intended as a freeway — 
in the heart of Milwaukee's urban neigh- 
borhoods. The aims were to integrate 
new development and open space within 
the existing urban context and to stabi- 
lize and revitalize the surrounding com- 
munity. Slides and a report documented 
the project. 



To plan for a two-stage international 
civic design competition to generate new 
ideas and visionary concepts about neigh- 
borhoods, cities, regions, and their inter- 
relationships. 



To analyze the effects of density regula- 
tions on the form of cities. The aim is to 
discover how land use regulations alTect 
the form of the urban landscape. A 
handbook on density regulations was pro- 
duced. 



44 CHAPTER ONE 



University Cooperative 
Housing Association 
FY 1987 
$30,000 
87-4251-0071 
Contact: University 
Cooperative Housing 
Association, 500 Landfair 
Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 
90024 



Vergara, Camilo J. 
FY 1983 
$10,000 
3M213-O0162 
Comae/. 535 West 110th 
Street, No. 21, New York, 
NY 10025 



For the redesign and adaptive use of 
Richard Neutra's Landfair Project, a 
pioneering example of apartment build- 
ings in the international style in Los An- 
geles. 



Virginia Polytechnic 

Institute and State 

University (VPI) 

FY 1982 

$27,122 

22-4252-082 

Contact: Assistant Professor, 

Architecture and 

Environmental Design, VPI, 

Research Division, 

Blacksburg,VA 24061 



Virginia Polytechnic 

Institute and State 

University 

FY 1984 

$100,000 

42-4257-0094 

Contact: Professor, College 

of Architecture and Urban 

Studies, Office of 

Sponsored Programs, VPI, 

Blacksburg, VA 24061 



Warburg, Felix M. 

FY 1977 

$15,000 

R71-42-11N 

Contact: 2844 Broderick 

Street, San Francisco, CA 

94111 



Windham Regional 

Planning and Development 

Commission 

FY 1980 

$6,000 

02-4251-016 

Contact: Chairman, 

Windham Regional 

Planning and Development 

Commission, PO. Box 818, 

Brattleboro, VT 05301 



To prepare an exhibit entitled Ruins and 
Revival: The Structure of America's De- 
teriorated Inner Cities. The exhibit con- 
sisted of photographs, prints and 
drawings that document the changing 
forms of slums in twelve American cities 
over a five-year period. A catalogue ac- 
companied the exhibit. 



For a post-occupancy evaluation of an 
addition to the Carol E. Newman Li- 
brary building at the Virginia Polytech- 
nic Institute. The aim was to show how 
people's apprehensions about moving can 
be minimized by involving them in the 
design process. A report was issued. 



To conduct a national architecture com- 
petition for the Center for Innovative 
Technology of the Commonwealth of 
Virginia, which will house research, in- 
dustrial development and education ac- 
tivities. A video and report documented 
the project. 



To study San Francisco's existing build- 
ing permit processes and their effects on 
urban form, with special emphasis on 
preservation and rehabilitation. A report. 
Permits and Preservation, was produced. 



To provide technical assistance to local 
planning commissions to help them rec- 
ognize elements of good design. An au- 
diovisual presentation and several reports 
were published. 



Zappas, Sam 

FY 1980 

$3,500 

01-4210-083 

Contact: Johns Hopkins 

University, 109 Oilman 

Hall, Baltimore, MD 21218 



To complete production of a documen- 
tary, Coldspring New Town: The Plan 
and the Process. The documentary con- 
sists of interviews with Moshe Safdie, 
Coldspring architect; M.J. Brodie, Balti- 
more Housing Commissioner; James 
Rouse, developer; Robert Embry, former 
undersecretary of the Department of 
Housing and Urban Development, and 
Robert Heilbroner, economist. 



Civics and Education 

Projects to increase citizen participation in community de- 
sign through education, self-help and state and regional 
technical assistance. 



Alabama State Council on 

the Arts and Humanities 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R70-42-197C 

Contact: Design Specialist, 

Alabama State Council on 

the Arts and Humanities, 

Gallagher House, 114 North 

Hull Street, Montgomery, 

AL 36130 



Alabama State Council on 

the Arts and Humanities 

FY 1977 

$13,000 

R70-42-46 

Contact: Design Specialist, 

Alabama State Council on 

the Arts and Humanities, 

Gallagher House, 1 14 North 

Hull Street, Montgomery, 

AL 36130 



Alabama State Council on 
the Arts and Humanities 
FY 1978 
$15,300 
R80-42-150 
Contact: Design 
Coordinator, Alabama 
Council on the Arts and 
Humanities, 449 South 
McDonough Street, 
Montgomery, AL 36130 



To continue the Design Services Pro- 
gram, initiated by the Alabama State 
Council on the Arts and Humanities in 
1976. Through the program, architects 
and design professionals rendered tech- 
nical assistance to their own communities 
and to areas lacking resident profes- 
sionals in the design fields. 



To continue Alabama's architecture and 
design program. The program provided 
design services to local arts councils and 
communities throughout Alabama. 



To continue support for the Design Co- 
ordinator program. The coordinator over- 
saw grants-in-aid, the Consortium for 
Learning Center, a master plan for cul- 
tural facilities and design awareness pro- 
grams. 



DESIGN FOR COMMUNITIES 45 



Alabama State Council on 

the Arts and Humanities 

FY 1985 

$15,000 

52-4251-0168 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Alabama Council on the 

Arts and Humanities, 323 

Adams Avenue, 

Montgomery, AL 36130 



Alaska State Council on the 

Arts 

FY 1977 

$20,000 

R70-42-47 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Alaska State Council on the 

Arts, 360 K Street, Suite 

240, Anchorage, AK 99501 



Allied Arts Foundation 

FY 1978 

$8,800 

R80-42-15 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Allied Arts Foundation, 107 

South Main, Seattle, WA 

98104 



American Institute of 
Architects (AIA) 
Foundation, Inc. 
FY 1985 
$25,000 
52-4256-0100 
Contact: Executive Vice- 
President, AIA Foundation, 
Inc., 1735 New York 
Avenue, N.W., Washington, 
DC 20006 



American Institute of 

Architects Foundation, Inc. 

FY 1987 

$12,500 

87-3446-0225 

Contact: President, AIA 

Foundation, Inc., 1735 New 

York Avenue, N.W., Room 

400, Washington, DC 20006 



Appalshop, Inc. 

FY 1979 

$21,760 

92-4212-204 

Contact: Project Director, 

Appalshop, Inc., RO. Box 

743, Whitesburg.KY 41858 



To convene a design arts forum, establish 
a task force to help structure a state 
arts/design arts program, produce a 
multiyear planning document and hire a 
project director to coordinate activities. 
The aim was to expand the agency's 
grant program and advance its leader- 
ship role in the design arts. 



To hire a design specialist to develop a 
design awareness program for the state 
of Alaska in cooperation with the Gover- 
nor's Growth Policy Council and the 
University of Alaska's Institute of Social, 
Economic and Government Research. 



To produce a film on Seattle's Pike 
Place Market for distribution to schools 
and community organizations in western 
Washington State. 



For American Architecture and Its Pub- 
lic, a national program that awards small 
matching grants on a competitive basis 
to local chapters. The program recog- 
nized projects that promoted community 
involvement in the preservation, enhance- 
ment and future of the civic environ- 
ment. A videotape was produced. 



To develop a guide to the television se- 
ries, "America By Design," for use by 
community groups, families and schools. 
The aim was to show how the architec- 
tural and design ideas presented in the 
series apply to public places, streets, 
workplaces, houses and communities. 



To produce "Translating Visions," a 
video documenting the process of partici- 
patory planning, design and construction 
of a church in an urban redevelopment 
area of Roanoke, Virginia. 



Appalshop, Inc. 

FY 1982 

$20,000 

22-4250-017 

Contact: Acting President, 

Appalshop, Inc., RO. Box 

743, Whitesburg, KY 41858 



Arizona Commission on the 

Arts 

FY 1986 

$15,000 

86-4251-0100 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Arizona Commission on the 

Arts, 417 West Roosevelt, 

Phoenix, AZ 85003 



Architects' Community 

Design Center of New 

Jersey 

FY 1983 

$8,000 

32-4250-00095 

Contact: President, 

Architects' Community 

Design Center of New 

Jersey, 487 Orange Street, 

Newark, N J 07107 



Architectural League of 

New York 

FY 1985 

$25,000 

52-4256-0102 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Architectural League of 

New York, 457'/: Madison 

Avenue, New York, NY 

10022 



Arts Assembly of 

Jacksonville, Inc. 

FY 1977 

$3,000 

R70-42-181 

Contact: Arts Assembly of 

Jacksonville, Inc., William 

Morgan Architects, 630 

May Street, Jacksonville, 

FL 32204 



Association of Collegiate 

Schools of Architecture 

FY 1978 

$7,683 

R80-42-183CN 

Contact: Executive Editor, 

Association of Collegiate 

Schools of Architecture, 

1735 New York Avenue, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20006 



To complete and edit "Translating Vi- 
sions." The video documentary traces the 
efforts of the members of a church in 
Roanoke, Virginia, as they develop a pro- 
gram, work through the problems of 
translating theological tenets into design 
concepts and discover their own capabili- 
ties in effecting the design of their new 
facility. 



To promote an awareness of design ex- 
cellence among mayors, city managers, 
city council members and other decision- 
makers through workshops, seminars and 
the Arizona Prisma Awards program. A 
catalogue of the Prisma award winners 
was published. 



To demonstrate how nonprofit commu- 
nity design centers can become self-suffi- 
cient by developing a promotional ser- 
vices information kit to aid centers in 
selling their design services. 



To produce Architectural Inquiries, Part 
II, the second year of a three-year public 
education program on architecture and 
design. The program consisted of exhi- 
bitions, publications, symposia, lecture 
series and special events for professional 
and lay audiences. 



To create a series of banners using im- 
ages drawn by school children and cele- 
brating the community's involvement in 
the building of the new Jacksonville Po- 
lice Memorial Building. 



To conduct a workshop that brings to- 
gether participants from eight midwest- 
ern states to share their experiences in 
neighborhood preservation and revitaliza- 
tion. 



46 CHAPTER ONE 



Association of Collegiate 

Schools of Architecture 

FY 1979 

$28,775 

92-4235-249 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Association of Collegiate 

Schools of Architecture, 

1735 New York Avenue, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20006 



Barnett, Jonathan 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R71-42-37N 

Contact: 30 Park Avenue, 

New York, NY 10016 



Boston Neighborhood 

Housing Services 

FY 1977 

$7,000 

R7a42-128 

Contact: Project Director, 

Boston Neighborhood 

Housing Services, 35 

Fernwood Road, Boston, 

MA 021 15 



Chicago Architectural 

Assistance Center 

FY 1977 

$20,000 

R7(>42-117 

Contact: Director, Chicago 

Architectural Assistance 

Center, 64 East Jackson 

Boulevard, Chicago, IL 

60604 



Chicago School of 

Architecture Foundation 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

92-4211-007 

Contact: Director, Chicago 

School of Architecture 

Foundation, 1 800 South 

Prairie Avenue, Chicago, IL 

60616 



City of Roanoke 
FY 1981 
$19,190 
12^250-255 
Contact: Community 
Planning Chief, City of 
Roanoke, Municipal 
Building, No. 355, 215 
Church Avenue, S.W., 
Roanoke, VA 24011 



To conduct a public environmental edu- 
cation demonstration program to encour- 
age greater public awareness of design 
values. 



To prepare a book that introduces ar- 
chitecture and environmental design to 
non-design professionals whose activities 
affect the built environment. 



To develop guidelines for housing renova- 
tion for Dorchester homeowners partici- 
pating in technical and financial assis- 
tance programs offered by the Boston 
Neighborhood Housing Service. Several 
pamphlets were produced. 



To develop the architectural and plan- 
ning staff for a comprehensive housing 
rehabilitation service providing residents 
of deteriorating neighborhoods in Chi- 
cago with design, planning, real estate, 
construction and legal assistance. 



To expand and relocate ArchiCenter, the 
Chicago School of Architecture Founda- 
tion's center on the built environment. 
The center offered a program of exhibits, 
lectures, films and special projects to en- 
courage the general public to explore 
Chicago. 



To produce a documentary film. The 
Roanoke Neighborhood 
Partnership. The film illustrates the in- 
novations community design can bring 
about. 



City of Washington 

FY 1979 

$5,125 

92-4212-143 

Contact: Director of 

Community Development, 

City of Washington, PO. 

Box 850, Washington, NC 

27889 



Cohen, Carla 

FY 1982 

$5,000 

21-4213-093 

Contact: 1322 Holly Street, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20012 



Colorado Council on the 

Arts and Humanities 

FY 1982 

$12,710 

22-4250-228 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Colorado Council on the 

Arts and Humanities, 770 

Pennsylvania Street, 

Denver, CO 80203 



Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, Department 
of Community Affairs 
FY 1982 
$3,000 
22-4250-057 
Contact: Assistant 
Secretary, Office of 
Communities, 100 
Cambridge Street, Room 
904, Boston, MA 02202 



Community Design Center 
School of Drafting and 
Design 
FY 1979 
$17,395 
92-4212-038 
Contact: Director, 
Community Design Center 
School of Drafting and 
Design, 935 North 
Washington Avenue, 
Lansing, MI 48906 



Community Design 

Information Center 

FY 1982 

$23,000 

22^250-130 

Contact: President, 

Community Design 

Information Center, 1 346 

Connecticut Avenue, N.W., 

Washington, DC 20036 



To host a series of seminars, workshops 
and walking tours highlighting design 
and historic preservation issues. A facade 
improvement manual for government of- 
ficials and residents of Washington, 
North Carolina, was also published. 



To produce a pamphlet entitled Let's 
Talk About It. The pamphlet discusses 
conflict anticipation and resolution and 
budget allocation negotiations for use by 
public officials, citizens' groups and pro- 
fessional organizations involved in the de- 
sign-development process. 



To develop a design excellence awards 
program. The nominating process in- 
volved professional design societies, the 
media and the public. Results were dis- 
seminated through a slide show and 
publications. 



To prepare two slide shows on the local 
design traditions of the towns of Franklin 
and Winch in Massachusetts, for presen- 
tation to the business community and 
townspeople. A videotape was also pro- 
duced. 



To hold a series of workshops on commu- 
nity revitalization alternatives. The aim 
was to encourage citizen participation in 
planning. 



To produce, print and disseminate three 
urban design publications that provide 
information on the Urban Environmental 
Design Program of the National League 
of Cities. 



DESIGN FOR COMMUNITIES 47 



Conservation Foundation 

FY 1979 

$15,000 

92-4233-064 

Contact: Assistant to the 

President, Conservation 

Foundation, 1717 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20036 



Conservation Foundation 

FY 1981 

$4,500 

12-4250-131 

Contact: Assistant to the 

President, Conservation 

Foundation, 1717 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20036 



Cornell University 

FY 1980 

$5,000 

02-4250-221 

Contact: Professor, Cornell 

University, Office of 

Sponsored Programs, 123 

Day Hall, Ithaca, NY 

14853 



Cornell University 

FY 1981 

$5,000 

12-4250-004 

Contact: Assistant Director, 

Cornell University, Office of 

Sponsored Programs, 123 

Day Hall, Ithaca, NY 

14853 



Corporate Design 

Foundation 

FY 1987 

$20,000 

87-4251-0161 

Contact: Chairman, 

Corporate Design 

Foundation, 449 

Marlborough Street, Boston, 

MA 021 15 



Cranbrook Educational 

Community 

FY 1980 

$10,000 

02-4221-200 

Contact: Program 

Coordinator, Cranbrook 

Education Community, 500 

Lone Pine Road, PO. Box 

801, Bloomfield. MI 48013 



To produce a film, Growing Pains: Rural 
America in the 1980s. The film examines 
issues of aesthetics and visual quality of 
the rural landscape, and its aim is to aid 
small towns in managing growth pres- 
sures while protecting the visual quality 
of the rural landscape. 



To publicize and disseminate the film, 
Growing Pains: Rural America in the 
1980s. 



To support the activities of the Small 
Town Community Design Workshop, a 
program operated by Cornell University. 



To continue the activities of the Small 
Town Community Design Workshop. Its 
programs included a community confer- 
ence concerning development, a work- 
shop and a resource center of literature 
for the region's communities. 



To introduce design courses into business 
school curricula to demonstrate that de- 
sign contributes both to quality of life 
and corporate success. 



To support the activities of the Design 
Michigan program of the Cranbrook 
Academy of Art. The statewide design 
awareness effort consisted of a resource 
center and clearinghouse, design confer- 
ences and exhibitions. A paperback book, 
Revitalization Through Design, and 
other materials were produced. 



Cranbrook Academy of Art 
FY 1982 
$9,000 
22-4250-015 
Contact: Program 
Coordinator, Design 
Michigan Program, 
Cranbrook Academy of Art, 
500 Lone Pine Road, 
Bloomfield Hills, MI 48013 



Cranbrook Educational 

Community 

FY 1983 

$20,000 

32-4250-00031 

Contact: Program Director, 

Design Michigan, 

Cranbrook Academy of Art, 

500 Lone Pine Drive, Box 

801, Bloomfield Hills, MI 

48013 



Cranbrook Academy of Art 

FY 1984 

$50,000 

42-4255-0080 

Contact: President, 

Cranbrook Academy of Art, 

Cranbrook Education 

Commission, 500 Lone Pine 

Road, Bloomfield Hills, MI 

48013 



Cultural Council 

Foundation for Charas 

FY 1979 

$7,500 

92-4233-066 

Contact: Project Director, 

Cultural Council 

Foundation for Charas, 175 

Fifth Avenue, New York, 

NY 10010 



District of Columbia 

Commission on the Arts and 

Humanities 

FY 1985 

$15,000 

51-4251-0169 

Contact: Executive Director, 

District of Columbia 

Commission on the Arts and 

Humanities, 407 Seventh 

Street, N.W., Second Floor, 

Washington, DC 20004 



To produce four issues of the Michigan 
Design Quarterly newsletter and other 
publications as part of Design Michigan, 
a statewide information program seeking 
to improve design's integral role in busi- 
ness, industry, state and local govern- 
ment. 



To continue Cranbrook's Design Michi- 
gan program. Three issues of Michigan 
Design Quarterly newsletter were pub- 
lished; a statewide architectural aware- 
ness program and lecture series. Ar- 
chitecture and Human Values, was 
produced and the exhibition, Design-in- 
Michigan, was circulated. 



To continue Design Michigan. The pro- 
gram addressed the design needs and 
problems of Michigan's business, indus- 
try, state and local government through 
workshops, conferences, lectures and 
publication of Michigan Design Quar- 
terly newsletter. 



To coordinate community involvement in 
planning and design of the Tompkins 
Square neighborhood. Special focus was 
placed on La Plaza Cultural, a large va- 
cant lot in the heart of this decaying 
area. 



To form a task force of public and pri- 
vate sector interests in the design field 
and to convene a conference to outline a 
design arts agenda within the DC. Com- 
mission on the Arts and Humanities. 



48 CHAPTER ONE 



Division of the Arts/ 
Department of Culture, 
Recreation and Tourism 
FY 1986 
$15,000 
86-4251-0186 
Contact: Grants Officer, 
Division of the Arts, 
Department of Culture, 
Recreation and Tourism, 
RO. Box 44247, Baton 
Rouge, LA 70804 



Don't Tear It Down 

FY 1980 

$10,000 

02-4221-202 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Don't Tear It Down, 1346 

Connecticut Avenue, NW, 

Washington, DC 20036 



East Tennessee Community 

Design Center 

FY 1981 

$15,000 

12-4230-057 

Contact: Coordinator, East 

Tennessee Community 

Design Center, 1522 

Highland Avenue, 

Knoxville, TN 37916 



Educational Facilities 

Laboratory 

FY 1977 

$17,000 

PC 77-22 

Contact: Director, 

Educational Facilities 

Laboratory, 680 Fifth 

Avenue, New York, NY 

10018 



Educational Futures 
FY 1978 
$15,810 
R80-42-1I4N 
Contact: Director, 
Educational Futures, PO. 
Box 13507, Philadelphia, 
PA 19101 



Educational Media 

FY 1981 

$22,775 

12-4250-196 

Contact: Educational 

Media, 873 Eighth Street, 

Boulder, CO 80302 



To establish a state arts/design arts pro- 
gram to increase public awareness of the 
significance of design in our lives and to 
focus attention on how communities can 
be enhanced through design. 



For a campaign to educate the citizens 
of Washington, D.C., about neighbor- 
hood conservation, landmark preserva- 
tion and the quality of the built environ- 
ment. Several reports documented the 
effort. 



To create a design panel of residents, 
planning and development represen- 
tatives and design professionals to draft 
an urban design plan for Fort Sanders, 
an inner-city neighborhood. A newsletter, 
a report and four booklets were produced 
on the project. 



To prepare three publications on the pur- 
poses, activities and informational re- 
sources of Partners for Livable Places. 
Partners' activities focused on coopera- 
tion between nonprofit design-oriented 
groups and cities to improve the quality 
of the built environment. 



To formulate program concepts, guide- 
lines for funding and a pilot project for 
an architects-in-communities program. 
Several reports documented the progress 
of the project. 



To produce a documentary on citizen 
participation in the planning process for 
Gunnison County, a rural mountain area 
faced with rapid growth as a tourist at- 
traction. 



Environmental Images, Inc. 
FY 1983 
$50,000 
DCA 83-23 
Contact: President, 
Environmental Images, Inc., 
1429 21st Street, N.W., 
Washington, DC 20036 



Environmental Images, Inc. 
FY 1984 
$50,000 

NEA DCA 84-1 
Contact: Vice-President, 
Environmental Images, Inc., 
1 346 Connecticut Avenue, 
N.W, Suite 325, 
Washington, DC 20036 



Exploring the Metropolis, 

Inc. 

FY 1985 

$9,500 

52-4256-0107 

Contact: Chairman, 

Exploring the Metropolis, 

Inc., 10 Gracie Street, New 

York, NY 10028 



Federated Arts of 

Manchester, Inc. 

FY 1978 

$30,000 

R80-42-86 

Contact: Box 36, 

Manchester, NH 03105 



Ferebee, Ann E. 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R8I-42-46N 

Contact: 47 Barrow Street, 

New York, NY 10014 



Fort Wayne Fine Arts 

Foundation, Inc. 

FY 1977 

$3,750 

R70-42-I98C 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Fort Wayne Fine Arts 

Foundation, Inc., 114 East 

Superior Street, Fort 

Wayne, IN 46802 



To develop presentations on the goals 
and results of the Design Arts Program's 
leadership initiatives addressing civic de- 
sign, adaptive reuse and other subjects. 



To develop model programs for design 
activities that can be successfully applied 
on the state level and to disseminate in- 
formation about these programs to states. 
A $5,000 amendment, NEA DCA 84- 
1.1, was made in 1984, to produce an au- 
diovisual presentation. 



To produce a public forum to discuss fu- 
ture physical development and concomi- 
tant changes anticipated for the Times 
Square and theater districts in Manhat- 
tan. A report. Look Out for Broadway — 
The Potential for Public-Private Part- 
nership, was produced. 



To establish a design information clear- 
inghouse in downtown Manchester, New 
Hampshire. The aim was to develop citi- 
zen awareness of proposed renovation 
plans for the city through educational 
materials and walking tours. 



To publish a handbook that explains the 
urban design field to developers, politi- 
cians, citizens and design professionals 
and demonstrates how urban design 
helps alleviate problems as well as im- 
prove urban form. 



To conduct community seminars on qual- 
ity design to stimulate public awareness 
in redevelopment planning for downtown 
Fort Wayne, Indiana. 



DESIGN FOR COMMUNITIES 49 



Foundation for Architecture 

FY 1985 

$10,000 

52-4256-0109 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Foundation for 

Architecture, 1 17 South 

17th Street, Philadelphia, 

PA 19103 



Garnham, Harry L. 

FY 1977 

$5,835 

R71-42-43N 

Contact: 264 Sugar Berry 

Circle, Houston, TX 77024 



Greater Washington 

Educational 

Telecommunications 

Association/ WETA 

FY 1981 

$200,000 

12-4241-176 

Contact: Greater 

Washington Educational 

Telecommunications 

Association/WETA, PO. 

Box 2626, Washington, DC 

20013 



Harvard University 

FY 1979 

$30,000 

92-4235-265 

Contact: Director. Harvard 

University, Office of 

Research Contracts, 1 350 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

Cambridge, MA 02138 



IDEA/ Downtown 

Development Foundation 

FY 1985 

$50,000 

52-4256-0014 

Contact: Chairman, IDEA/ 

Downtown Development 

Foundation, Inc., 915 15th 

Street, N.W, Suite 901, 

Washington, DC 20005 



Illinois Arts Council 

FY 1978 

$5,110 

R80^2-21 

Contact: Director, Arts 

Services. Illinois Arts 

Council. 1 1 1 North 

Wabash, Room 720, 

Chicago, I L 60602 



To Start a monthly architecture and ur- 
ban design newspaper for general distri- 
bution throughout Philadelphia. 



To prepare a book on the design process 
for use by those whose decisions influ- 
ence the visual quality of small towns, 
villages and rural landscapes. 



To support "America by Design," a se- 
ries of five one-hour television programs 
on architecture, planning and design 
demonstrating how spaces, places and so- 
lutions come about in the built environ- 
ment. 



To provide planning and design services 
to communities that cannot afford pro- 
fessional assistance. Among the services 
offered were technical assistance to com- 
munity clients, working documents and 
written guides. 



To produce a publication showing how 
the processes that shape our cities and 
the urban environment are the result of 
negotiation and compromise among city 
governments, businesses, real estate de- 
velopers, financial interests and the pub- 
lic. 



To tour the courtroom drama. The Night 
of January Sixteenth, to Illinois commu- 
nities that have historic courthouses in 
order to stimulate citizen awareness and 
interest in courthouse renovation 
projects. 



Illinois Arts Council 
FY 1986 
$15,000 
86-4251-0099 
Contact: Deputy Director. 
Illinois Arts Council. 100 
West Randolph, Suite 10- 
500, Chicago, IL 60601 



Inland Architect Press 

FY 1981 

$10,360 

12-4250-197 

Contact: Business Manager. 

Inland Architect Press. 53 

West Jackson Street. Suite 

346, Chicago, IL 60604 



Institute for Environmental 

Action. Inc. 

FY 1977 

$40,000 

PC 77-23 

Contact: Director. Institute 

for Environmental Action. 

Inc.. 81 Leonard Street, 

New York, NY 10013 



Institute for Environmental 

Action, Inc. 

FY 1978 

$20,637 

R80-42-180CN 

Contact: Director, Institute 

for Environmental Action, 

Inc.. 81 Leonard Street. 

New York. NY 10012 



Institute for Environmental 

Action. Inc. 

FY 1978 

$5,000 

R80-42-22 

Contact: Director, Institute 

for Environmental Action, 

Inc.. 81 Leonard Street. 

New York. NY 10013 



Institute for Environmental 

Action. Inc. 

FY 1979 

$14,365 

92-4235-132 

Contact: Director. Institute 

for Environmental Action, 

Inc.. 81 Leonard Street. 

New York. NY 10013 



For the Arts Build Illinois program. The 
program engaged consultants to develop 
a design arts program in cooperation 
with the state's new Capital Develop- 
ment Program. 



For a series of articles in Inland Ar- 
chitecture magazine devoted to federal 
and public design policy. The articles ex- 
amine government-sponsored design im- 
provement programs and include profiles 
of officials who have provided momen- 
tum to the improvement of design qual- 
ity. 



To develop a public information strategy 
and a series of publications in order to 
disseminate the creative ideas embodied 
in grants made over the past ten years by 
the Architecture -I- Environmental Arts 
Division of the National Endowment for 
the Arts. Two reports. Learning from 
Denver and Learning from Seattle, were 
produced. 



To publish and distribute the series. 
Learning from the Endowment. The se- 
ries documents innovative uses of federal 
dollars to solve urban design and plan- 
ning problems. Two reports. Learning 
from Atlanta and Reviving Urban Wa- 
terfronts, were produced. 



To convert an audiovisual presentation 
from the exhibit "More Streets for Peo- 
ple" to 16-mm film for distribution to 
educational and community groups. 



To complete manuscripts and production 
work on a volume of the series Learning 
from the USA: What Makes Cities Liv- 
able. Brochures and reports entitled 
Learning from the USA and learning 
from Baltimore were produced. 



50 CHAPTER ONE 



Institute for Environmental 

Action. Inc. 

FY 1979 

$17,500 

92^212-043 

Conlacl: Vice-President, 

Institute for Environmental 

Action. Inc., 81 Leonard 

Street. New York, NY 

10013 



Institute for Urban Design 

FY 1980 

$27,500 

CA 80-18 

Contact: Director, Institute 

for Urban Design, Main 

Post Office. Box 105, 

Purchase, NY 10577 



Institute for Urban Design 

FY 1982 

$15,000 

22-4250-140 

Conlacl: Director. Institute 

for Urban Design. Main 

Post Office. Box 105, 

Purchase, NY 10577 



Institute for Urban Design 

FY 1983 

$63,000 

DCA 83-13 

Conlacl: Director, Institute 

for Urban Design, Main 

Post Office, Box 105, 

Purchase. NY 10577 



Institute for Urban Design 

FY 1987 

$19,000 

87-4251-0119 

Conlacl: Director, Institute 

for Urban Design, RO. Box 

105, Purchase, NY 10577 



Lutin. Jerome M. 

FY 1977 

$9,650 

R7M2-30N 

Conlacl: 1-X Apartments. 

Faculty Road. Princeton, 

NJ 08540 



Maine Arts Commission 

FY 1987 

$15,000 

87-4241-0112 

Conlacl: Executive Director. 

Maine Arts Commission, 55 

Capitol Street. Slate House 

Station 25. Augusta, ME 

04333 



To produce two volumes in the series 
Learning from USA on Minneapoiis/St. 
Paul and Cincinnati. 



To supply technical and professional con- 
sulting services to the Endowment's De- 
sign Excellence Project. The aim of the 
project was to raise public awareness 
about the value of good design in the 
built and manufactured environment. 



To present a workshop in Los Angeles on 
successful partnership innovations be- 
tween public and private sectors to fi- 
nance downtown developments. A special 
issue of Urban Design International 
documented the workshop. 



For services to Design Excellence Project 
initiatives, among them the Design The- 
ory Initiative, the Design Competition 
Initiative, the Designers in Public Ser- 
vice Program and others. 



To prepare an annotated bibliography on 
urban design using the expertise of schol- 
ars in the fields of design, environmental 
psychology, urban geography, sociology, 
political science, real estate, municipal fi- 
nance and public administration. 



To plan workshops for public officials 
and community groups on the legal, eco- 
nomic and design aspects of preserving 
and restoring railroad stations in New 
Jersey. 



To support a design staff in the state arts 
agency and to implement a design assis- 
tance program to four Maine communi- 
ties: Portland, Lewiston, Auburn and 
Bangor. 



Maine State Commission on 

the Arts and Humanities 

FY 1979 

$22,725 

92^235-119 

Contact: Associate Director, 

Maine State Commission on 

the Arts and Humanities, 

State House, Augusta, ME 

10433 



Massachusetts Council on 
the Arts and Humanities 
FY 1984 
$30,000 
42-4255-0081 
Conlacl: Chairman, 
Massachusetts Council on 
the Arts and Humanities, 
One Ashburton Place, 
Boston, MA 02108 



Massachusetts Council on 

the Arts and Humanities 

FY 1985 

$30,000 

52-4251-0078 

Conlacl: Executive Director, 

Massachusetts Council on 

the Arts and Humanities, 

One Ashburton Place, 

Boston, MA 02108 



Massachusetts Council on 

the Arts and Humanities 

FY 1986 

$15,000 

86-4251-0036 

Conlacl: Executive Director, 

Massachusetts Council on 

the Arts and Humanities, 80 

Boyleston Street, The Little 

Building, 10th Floor, 

Boston, MA 021 16 



Massachusetts Council on 

the Arts and Humanities 

FY 1987 

$23,500 

87-4251-0038 

Conlacl: Associate Director, 

Massachusetts Council on 

the Arts and Humanities, 80 

Boyleston Street, The Little 

Building, 1 0th Floor, 

Boston, MA 021 16 



For Maine Streets Future, a four-day de- 
sign forum to educate decision-makers in 
small cities and towns on nontraditional 
approaches to urban revitalization. 



To improve the quality of design in the 
built environment in Massachusetts by 
establishing two pilot programs with 
state agencies responsible for public 
building projects and by researching pos- 
sible improvements to each agency's de- 
sign policies. 



To provide technical design assistance to 
selected communities in Massachusetts 
to improve the quality of design in the 
built environment. 



To expand the state's design awards pro- 
gram to include privately financed (as 
well as publicly funded) buildings; to es- 
tablish awards for private developers and 
public agencies; and to hire an awards 
coordinator to oversee the program and 
to publish and distribute the results to 
other arts organizations. 



To hire a design coordinator to manage a 
grant program assisting towns and cities 
in the enhancement of their urban envi- 
ronments. Preliminary research for a de- 
sign-in-education program for Massachu- 
setts school children was also conducted. 



DESIGN FOR COMMUNITIES 5 1 



Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology 

FY 1984 

$25,000 

42-4256-0013 

Contact: Director, 

Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology, Office of 

Sponsored Programs, 77 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

Cambridge, MA 02139 



Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology 

FY 1986 

$36,050 

86-4252-0131 

Contact: Director, 

Sponsored Research, 

Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology, 77 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

Cambridge, MA 02139 



Michigan Council for the 

Arts 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R7a42-50 

Contact: Environmental 

Arts Coordinator, Michigan 

Council for the Arts, 1 200 

Sixth Avenue, Detroit, Ml 

48226 



Michigan Council for the 

Arts 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R70-42-49 

Contact: Environmental 

Arts Coordinator, Michigan 

Council for the Arts, 1 200 

Sixth Avenue, Detroit, Ml 

48226 



Michigan Council for the 

Arts 

FY 1978 

$15,000 

R80-42-59N 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Michigan Council for the 

Arts, 1 200 Sixth Street, 

Detroit, Ml 48226 



Miller, Iris 

FY 1982 

$2,000 

21-4213-6122 

Contact: 5833 Marbury 

Road. Bethesda, MD 20817 



For a series of public lectures, discus- 
sions and debates on urban design and 
planning in downtown Boston. The pro- 
gram brought together practitioners in 
the fields of architecture, planning and 
economics and culminated in a city con- 
ference in May 1984. The activities re- 
ceived extended coverage in The Boston 
Globe (a cosponsor of the program with 
M.I.T.). 



For a publication to educate developers 
and administrators about sensitive 
growth and development. The publica- 
tion. Housing Design and Regional 
Character: A Primer for New England 
Towns, illustrates principles of tradi- 
tional urban form and shows how these 
principles can be translated into contem- 
porary settings, with special emphasis on 
smaller communities. 



To conduct phase two of Design Michi- 
gan. The phase consisted of fourteen 
small design assemblies around the state, 
distribution of educational posters, prepa- 
ration of an audiovisual presentation and 
publication of a buyer's guide in ar- 
chitecture, planning, interior and graphic 
design. 



To hire a professional designer to coordi- 
nate implementation of phase two of De- 
sign Michigan, including the develop- 
ment of a juried design exhibition to tour 
the state. 



To hire a coordinator for the Design 
Michigan program, which includes a 
statewide design assembly. 



To assemble a design workshop. Commu- 
nity Issues Inquiry, to identify and clar- 
ify community needs and aspirations for 
a six-block downtown business district in 
Washington, D.C. 



Mississippi State University 

FY 1980 

$9,600 

02-4250-126 

Contact: Assistant Professor, 

Mississippi State University, 

Center for Small Town 

Research, PO. Drawer AQ, 

Mississippi State, MS 

39762 



MSA Foundation for 

Environmental Computer 

Design, Inc. 

FY 1978 

$13,600 

R80-42-24 

Conlacr 314 Clifton 

Avenue, Minneapolis, MN 

55403 



Municipal Art Society 

FY 1977 

$12,500 

R70-42-98 

Contact: Vice-President, 

Municipal Art Society, 30 

Rockefeller Plaza, New 

York, NY 10020 



National Community 

Design Center Directors' 

Association 

FY 1980 

$17,173 

02-4250-129 

Contact: President, National 

Community Design Center 

Directors' Association, 380 

Main Street, East Orange, 

NJ 07018 



National Community 

Design Center Directors' 

Association 

FY 1980 

$20,000 

02-4221-207 

Contact: National 

Community Design Center 

Directors' Association, 370 

Orange Street, Newark, NJ 

07107 



National Conference of 

State Legislatures 

FY 1983 

$20,000 

32-425000113 

Contact: Senior Manager, 

National Conference of 

State Legislators, 1 125 17th 

Street, No 1.500. Denver, 

CO 80303 



To inform elected officials and civic 
leaders in small towns of the impact of 
public policy decisions on the design 
quality of downtowns through a program 
emphasizing self-help and utilization of 
local resources. A pamphlet and report 
were produced. 



For the Minnesota Society of the Ameri- 
can Institute of Architects to plan a cen- 
ter for public education and design. A re- 
port. What Architects Do, and other 
materials were produced. 



To conduct a feasibility study for a pub- 
lic information and exhibition center ad- 
dressing current issues and proposals for 
design, planning and historic preservation 
in New York City. A proposal for creat- 
ing the center was given in the study re- 
port. 



To support increased technical assistance 
from community design centers to com- 
munities throughout the country. The 
aims were to strengthen the network of 
design centers and to encourage the cre- 
ation of new ones. 



To establish a staff based in Washington, 
D.C. The aim was to improve the exist- 
ing nationwide network of community 
design centers, which provide free, high- 
quality design services for both rural and 
urban low-income neighborhoods. A re- 
port on activities was issued. 



To broaden the awareness of state legis- 
lators to the value and practice of design 
in America by conducting seminars on 
the preparation of draft legislation con- 
cerning design issues. A video and re- 
ports on art, tourism and historic pres- 
ervation were produced. 



52 CHAPTER ONE 



National Conference of 

State Legislatures 

FY 1985 

$35,000 

52-425W)041 

Contact: Director of State 

Services, National 

Conference of State 

Legislatures, 1125 17th 

Street, Suite 1 500, Denver, 

CO 80202 



National Trust for Historic 

Preservation 

FY 1977 

$34,070 

R7042-139N 

Contact: Director, National 

Trust for Historic 

Preservation, 1785 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20036 



National Trust for Historic 

Preservation 

FY 1987 

$15,250 

87-4251-0029 

Contact: President, National 

Trust for Historic 

Preservation, 1785 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20036 



National Trust for Historic 

Preservation 

FY 1987 

$29,000 

87-4251-0057 

Contact: President, National 

Trust for Historic 

Preservation, 1785 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20036 



Neighborhood Housing 

Services of Albuquerque, 

Inc. 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R8a42-92 

Contact: President, 

Neighborhood Housing 

Services of Albuquerque, 

Inc., 920 Lomas Boulevard, 

Albuquerque, NM 87102 



To publish a casebook for state legisla- 
tors on drafting and introducing legisla- 
tion to improve design programs in state 
governments. 



To establish a national neighborhood 
clearinghouse. The aim was to expand 
the advisory services available to the 
neighborhood conservation field by pro- 
viding added staff expertise, information 
resources, publications and on-site tech- 
nical assistance. A newsletter and report 
documented the project. 



To produce an educational project enti- 
tled A Partnership of Pride. The project 
consisted of an audiovisual presentation 
and program guide showing how historic 
preservation can be a force in revitalizing 
older, lower-income neighborhoods. 



To publish a book on the forces that 
shape cities. The book was based on the 
Willard Conference, a seminar with may- 
ors, urban designers, developers, pres- 
ervation advocates and critics. 



To enhance historic preservation and de- 
sign of downtown Albuquerque by devel- 
oping instructive materials and programs 
for residents: preservation brochures, 
slide lecture presentations, practical 
workshops and The Old House Work- 
book. 



Neighborhood Housing 
Services of Baltimore 
FY 1983 
$3,500 

32-4250-00041 
Contact: Design and 
Marketing Specialist, 
Neighborhood Housing 
Services of Baltimore, 
5411'/! York Road, 
Baltimore, MD 21212 



Neighborhood Housing 

Services of Cleveland 

FY 1978 

$5,000 

R80-42-106 

Contact: Director, 4415 

Bridge Avenue, Cleveland, 

OH 44223 



Neighborhood Housing 

Service of Reading, Inc. 

FY 1980 

$8,960 

02-4250-130 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Neighborhood Housing 

Service of Reading, Inc., 

221 West Buttonwood 

Street, Reading, PA 19601 



New Jersey State Council 

on the Arts 

FY 1987 

$15,000 

87-4241-0087 

Contact: Executive Director, 

New Jersey State Council 

on the Arts, 109 West State 

Street, Trenton, NJ 08625 



New York Landmarks 

Preservation Foundation 

FY 1982 

$6,730 

22-4250-065 

Contact: Chairman, New 

York Landmarks 

Preservation Foundation, 20 

Vesey Street, New York, 

NY 10007 



New York Landmarks 

Preservation Foundation 

FY 1982 

$25,000 

22-4250-148 

Contact: President, New 

York Landmarks 

Preservation Foundation, 20 

Vesey Street, New York, 

NY 10007 



For Banner Neighborhoods Journal, a 
newsletter produced with community 
participation. The newsletter served the 
East Baltimore area by providing in- 
formation to residents about local design 
and planning issues. A videotape was 
also produced. 



To prepare a homeowner's preservation 
manual for Cleveland's Near West Side 
with guidelines on maintaining the his- 
toric character of buildings through eco- 
nomical home renovations. 



To produce a brochure and slide show 
entitled "Discovering the Sixth Ward's 
History and Architecture." The materi- 
als were part of a program to encourage 
home rehabilitation through a partner- 
ship of residents of Reading, Pennsylva- 
nia, and leading institutions. 



To implement a design arts program for 
the state of New Jersey by hiring a 
project coordinator and establishing an 
advisory board of design professionals at 
the state arts agency. 



To prepare a narrated slide presentation 
for use by community groups in historic 
districts. The aim was to increase their 
understanding of and participation in his- 
toric and architectural preservation. 



To publish a manual that identifies vari- 
ous architectural styles and provides re- 
pair and renovation guidelines for New 
York City's forty-two designated historic 
districts. 



DESIGN FOR COMMUNITIES 53 



New York Urban Coalition, 

Inc. 

FY 1978 

SI 5,000 

R8(M2-50 

Contact: New York Urban 

Coalition, Inc., People's 

Development Corporation, 

1270 Avenue of the 

Americas, New York, NY 

10020 



North Carolina Arts 

Council 

FY 1987 

$100,000 

87-4251-0090 

Contact: Executive Director, 

North Carolina Arts 

Council, Department of 

Cultural Resources, 

Raleigh, NC 27611 



Off Center Theater, Inc. 

FY 1979 

$19,500 

92-4212-050 

Contact: Adminstrative 

Director, Off Center 

Theater, Inc., 436 West 

ISthStreet, New York, NY 

10011 



Off Center Theater 

FY 1981 

$15,000 

12^250-203 

Contact: Adminstrative 

Director, Off Center 

Theater, 436 West 18th 

Street, New York, NY 

lOOn 



Ohio Arts Council 

FY 1982 

$30,000 

22-4250066 

Contact: Coordinator, Ohio 

Arts Council/Ohio 

Humanities Council 

Program, Ohio Arts 

Council, 440 Dublin 

Avenue, Columbus, OH 

43214 



Ohio Arts Council 

FY 1983 

$21,720 

32-4250-00116 

Contact: Coordinator. Ohio 

Arts Council/Ohio 

Humanities Council Joint 

Program, 65 Jefferson 

Avenue, Columbus, OH 

43215 



To establish a planning and design unit 
for the Morrisania neighborhood in 
Bronx, New York. A team of profes- 
sionals instructed community residents in 
planning, design concepts and skills nec- 
essary for building rehabilitation and 
neighborhood revitalization. 



For Pride in Place, a technical assistance 
program for small towns in North Caro- 
lina, South Carolina and Tennessee. Fif- 
teen communities were selected from the 
fifty-two cities that have participated in 
the National Trust's Main Street pro- 
gram. Resource teams aided the commu- 
nities in assessing requirements for eco- 
nomic development, amenities and 
cultural planning. 



To create and perform a series of mini- 
plays depicting neighborhood improve- 
ment projects. The plays were performed 
in the New York City metropolitan area 
and were used as tools to disseminate in- 
formation on the design and planning 
process to the general public. 



To produce a series of mini-plays entitled 
Biting the Apple — A Comedy About 
Neighborhood Improvement Projects^ a 
tool to disseminate design and planning 
information to the general public. 



To undertake a one-year pilot project, 
Human Values and the Built Environ- 
ment, a design arts program sponsored 
by the Ohio Arts Council and the Ohio 
Humanities Council. 



To continue Human Values and the Built 
Environment, a grant program which 
awarded funds to seventeen Ohio orga- 
nizations for design arts projects. Slides 
and informational materials documented 
the project. 



Ohio Arts Council 

FY 1985 

$47,970 

52-4256-0043 

Contact: Deputy Director, 

Ohio Arts Council, 727 East 

Main Street, Columbus, OH 

43205 



Ohio Arts Council 

FY 1986 

$15,000 

86-4251-0037 

Contact: Deputy Director, 

Ohio Arts Council, 727 East 

Main Street, Columbus, OH 

43205 



Oklahoma City Arts 

Council, Inc. 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R80-42-155 

Contact: Director, 

Oklahoma City Arts 

Council, Inc., 3014 Paseo, 

Oklahoma City, OK 73103 



Partners for Livable Places 

FY 1978 

$150,000 

R8042-1I7N 

Contact: President, Partners 

for Livable Places, 2120 P 

Street, N.W, Washington, 

DC 20037 



Partners for Livable Places 

FY 1979 

$15,000 

92-4236-117 

Contact: Associate Director, 

Partners for Livable Places, 

2120 P Street, N.W, 

Washington, DC 20037 



Passonneau. Joseph R. 

FY 1978 

$17,500 

R81-42-21CN 

Contact: 3015 Q Street, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20007 



To sponsor Ohio Design Initiatives, a 
program of outreach and technical assis- 
tance that places design professionals in 
residencies in six to eight communities. 
The designers guided the participants 
through a public design process and 
aided in developing an exemplary com- 
munity-originated design project. 



To expand the Ohio Arts Council's in- 
volvement in design arts through a series 
of design arts workshops, a workshop for 
nonprofit organizations on graphic design 
and production of informational materi- 
als. 



To conduct a workshop in townscape pro- 
cesses for local professionals. Design con- 
sultants selected from the workshop 
collaborated with three pilot communi- 
ties as part of Oklahoma Landscape, a 
program to increase Oklahomans' aware- 
ness of their built environment. 



To establish a partnership of individuals 
and organizations to promote the idea of 
livable communities. This involved devel- 
oping tools enabling communities to eval- 
uate their physical environments, pub- 
lishing numerous articles on community 
livability and conducting a public forum, 
"Livability in Times of Constraint," in 
Washington, D.C. 



For a recognition program granting 
credit to those outside the design com- 
munity responsible for imaginative de- 
sign solutions. The aim was to create an 
incentive for good design among business 
and corporate officials. 



To produce a 16-mm film, // You Want 
to Change Your City. The film is avail- 
able for distribution through professional 
societies. 



54 CHAPTER ONE 



Philadelphia City Planning 

Commission 

FT 1985 

$30,000 

52^256-0120 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Philadelphia City Planning 

Commission, City Hall 

Annex, 13th Floor, 

Philadelphia, PA 19107 



Prairie Community Design 

Center 

FY 1977 

$16,425 

R7a42-I48 

Contact: General 

Administrator, Prairie 

Community Design Center, 

Box 9, Fargo, ND 58102 



Pratt Institute 

FT 1980 

$20,000 

06-4230-100 

Contact: Director, Pratt 

Institute, Center for 

Community and 

Environmental 

Development, 275 

Washington Avenue, 

Brooklyn, NY 11205 



Project for Public Spaces, 

Inc. 

FY 1979 

$11,800 

92-4211-029 

Contact: Project Director, 

Project for Public Spaces, 

Inc., 1270 Avenue of the 

Americas, Room No. 4, 

New York, NY 10020 



Regional Conference of 

Historical Agencies 

FY 1978 

$15,000 

R80-42-109 

Contact: Director, Regional 

Conference of Historical 

Agencies, 314 East Seneca 

Street, Manlius, NY 13104 



Regional Young Adult 

Project of Northern 

California 

FY 1980 

$10,000 

02-4221-076 

Contact: Director, Regional 

Young Adult Project of 

Northern California, 944 

Market Street, No. 705, 

San Francisco, CA 94102 



To produce and broadcast four video 
presentations on the plan that will guide 
Center City Philadelphia's development 
into the next century. 



To develop a program of design services 
for preservation and adaptive use 
projects in small communities. 



For the Center for Community and Envi- 
ronmental Development, a cooperative 
effort among students and faculty of 
Pratt Institute, volunteers from commu- 
nity organizations and the center's pro- 
fessional staff. The center provides high- 
quality design assistance to 
neighborhood-based clients. A slide 
presentation and report documented the 
center's activities. 



To develop a pilot demonstration project 
in the "museum mile," a twenty-block 
area east of Central Park containing ten 
cultural institutions, to increase public 
awareness of and access to these cultural 
resources. A report entitled Museum 
Mile was produced. 



To provide technical expertise in historic 
preservation to five rural villages in the 
Southern Tier/Finger Lakes Region of 
New York. Public programs on design 
were held, and several historic buildings 
and districts were identified, documented 
and registered. 



To provide support to the Center for De- 
sign and its efforts to stimulate commu- 
nication among designers, other profes- 
sionals and the public. 



Research Foundation of the 

City University of New 

York 

FY 1980 

$5,000 

02-4250-120 

Contact: Director, New 

York Tours, Hunter 

College, 1515 Broadway, 

New York, NY 10036 



Richard Grefe Associates 

FY 1980 

$35,000 

PC 80-26 

Contact: Richard Grefe 

Associates, 1313 

Constitution Avenue, N.E., 

Washington, DC 20002 



Rudofsky, Bernard 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R81-42-5N 

Contact: c/o Iris Alex, 100 

Beekman Street, New York, 

NY 10038 



Sisk, Nancy 

FY 1978 

$9,611 

R81-42-52N 

Contact: 1022 Wilson 

Boulevard, Arlington, VA 

22209 



Slayton, William L. 

FY 1986 

$5,000 

86^213-0115 

Contact: 341 1 Ordway 

Street, N.W., Washington, 

DC 20016 



Small Towns Institute 

FY 1977 

$10,300 

R70-42-163 

Contact: Codirector, Small 

Towns Institute, RO. Box 

517, Allensburg, WA 98926 



State of Arkansas 

FY 1980 

$29,050 

02-4220-059 

Contact: State of Arkansas, 

Department of Finance and 

Administration, P.O. Box 

2485, Little Rock, AR 

72203 



To explain the function of urban design 
to the general public, students, educators 
and political decision-makers through a 
series of guided bus tours held each 
weekend throughout the year. 



To produce a report and slide show enti- 
tled Taking Design Seriously. The work 
surveys and evaluates the experiences of 
grantees in order to assess the effects of 
Design Arts Program grant support over 
the past thirteen years. 



To perform research for a book on ar- 
chitecture that incorporates new guide- 
lines for the architectural education of 
laymen. 



To design and publish a booklet to serve 
as a guide to strategies for applying the 
design disciplines to local opportunities 
for making communities more livable. 



To write a chapter for a book on urban 
renewal that explores the role of urban 
and building design in the renewal pro- 
cess and examines federal policies which 
encourage a high caliber of design. 



For the Design Resourcebook for Small 
Communities. The report focuses on de- 
sign problems and solutions in small 
towns and rural areas and emphasizes 
projects that contribute to a greater 
awareness of design principles in the nat- 
ural and built environments. 



For phase three of the Design Arkansas 
program, a proposal for establishing de- 
sign as a priority for state and local gov- 
ernment units. 



DESIGN FOR COMMUNITIES 55 



Town of Charleslown 

FY 1979 

$17,500 

92-4221-247 

Contact: President, Town 

Council, Town of 

Charleslown, RO. Box 372, 

Charleslown, Rl 02813 



Townscape Instilute 
FY 1983 
$29,970 
32-423000091 
Contact: President, 
Townscape Institute, 2 
Hubbard Park, Cambridge, 
MA 02138 



Trust for Public Land 

FY 1979 

$9,845 

92-4233-193 

Contact: Training 

Coordinator, Trust for 

Public Land, 82 Second 

Street, San Francisco, CA 

94105 



Trust for Public Land 

FY 1979 

$11,350 

92-4233-080 

Contact: Trust for Public 

Land, 95 Madison Avenue, 

New York, NY 10016 



University of Cincinnati 

FY 1980 

$10,000 

02-4250-111 

Contact: Director, School of 

Architecture and Interior 

Design, University of 

Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 

45221 



University of Colorado at 

Denver 

FY 1981 

$10,000 

12-4230048 

Contact: Community 

Planner, University of 

Colorado at Denver, 1 100 

14th Street, Denver, CO 

80202 



For Charlestown — Yesterday, Today, To- 
morrow, a discovery and awareness 
project on the natural and built environ- 
ment of Charlestown, Rhode Island. The 
program directly involved elementary 
school students, teachers and citizens. 



To conduct a phonebook cover design 
competition. Phonebook cover designs 
were submitted by phonebook users, and 
the work best reflecting the character, 
history, ethnicity or geography of the 
Cambridge area was selected by a panel 
of design and art experts. 



To prepare a handbook instructing neigh- 
borhood groups how to develop vacant 
properties into useful community re- 
sources. A citizens' action manual was 
produced. 



To provide technical assistance to inner- 
city residents for effective assessment of 
land-use and open-space projects in New 
York City. Two reports and the Guide to 
Land Use Decision-making for Commu- 
nity Boards in New York City were pro- 
duced. 



To develop a demonstration model for 
communities and individuals involved in 
any of the stages of historic preservation 
and conservation, including the formula- 
tion of legislation and guidelines. 



To create a community design center to 
provide design resources to help solve 
problems of rural areas and small towns. 
The center formulated planning studies 
for Whittier, Jamestown and Eldorado 
Springs, Colorado. 



University of Michigan 

FY 1980 

$3,140 

02-4230-095 

Contact: Dean, College of 

Architecture and Urban 

Planning, University of 

Michigan, Ann Arbor, Ml 

48109 



University of Pennsylvania 

FY 1979 

$17,988 

92-4212-057 

Contact: Principal 

Investigator, 3451 Walnut 

Street, Philadelphia, PA 

19104 



University of Vermont and 
State Agricultural College 
FY 1986 
$24,000 
86-4256-0141 
Contact: Director, 
Sponsored Programs, 
University of Vermont, 
Burlington, VT 05405 



U.S. Conference of Mayors 

Research and Education 

Foundation 

FY 1987 

$3,834 

87-4251-0157 

Contact: Executive Director. 

U.S. Conference of Mayors, 

1620 I Street, N.W., 

Washington, DC 20006 



Utah Arts Council 

FY 1985 

$15,000 

52-4251-0170 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Utah Arts Council, 617 

East South Temple, Salt 

Lake City, UT 84102 



Vermont Council on the 

Arts 

FY 1978 

$14,000 

R80-42-62 

Contact: Vermont Council 

on the Arts, 1 36 State 

Street, Montpclier, VT 

05602 



To expand the activities of the Commu- 
nity Design Team: architecture students 
who, with faculty guidance, provide de- 
sign services to residents of inner-city 
Detroit. A report on the activities was is- 
sued. 



To devise a public information program 
for communities establishing boards of 
architectural review to protect their cul- 
tural heritage. The program included 
land use workshops and audiovisual 
presentations. A report. Heritage Con- 
servation and Community Planning, was 
issued. 



To develop three-dimensional models for 
visualizing design changes in townscapes. 
Several Vermont towns served as visual 
laboratories. The aim was to permit 
townspeople and designers to manipulate 
and test effects of proposed design 
changes. 



To hold a workshop on urban design at 
the annual meeting of the U.S. Confer- 
ence of Mayors. The aim was to initiate 
a discussion on quality design between 
mayors and design professionals. A re- 
port covered the resolutions adopted at 
the conference. 



To hire a design arts coordinator to bring 
together architects, city planners, devel- 
opers and artists for thoughtful planning 
in the face of rapid urban growth. 



To develop a statewide architecture 
awareness program, including graphic 
and printed materials, regional work- 
shops and citizen participation. 



56 CHAPTER ONE 



Virginia Polytechnic 

Institute and State 

University (VPI) 

FY 1980 

$3,522 

02-4250-143 

Contact: Director, 

Environmental Design, 

College of Architecture, 

VPI, Blacksburg,VA 24061 



Vision, Inc. 

FY 1977 

$5,000 

R7042-44 

Contact: Vision, Inc., 678 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

Suite 601, Cambridge, MA 

02138 



WeCan Neighborhood 

Improvement Association, 

Inc. 

FY 1980 

$25,000 

02-4254-055 

Contact: Executive Director, 

WeCan Neighborhood 

Improvement Association, 

Inc., 643 Washington 

Street, Dorchester, MA 

02124 



Western State College 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

92^212-230 

Contact: Director, Planning, 

Western State College, 

Gunnison, CO 81230 



WETV/Atlanta Board of 

Education 

FY 1978 

$29,145 

R80-42-33 

Contact: Producer, WETV/ 

Atlanta Board of Education, 

740 Bismark Road, N.E., 

Atlanta, GA 30324 



Windham Regional 

Planning and Development 

Commission 

FY 1980 

$6,000 

02-4251-016 

Contact: Chairman, 

Windham Regional 

Planning and Development 

Commission, RO. Box 818, 

Brattleboro, VT 05301 



To produce a publication entitled 
Choices: Alternatives for Housing in Old 
Northwest Roanoke, written primarily 
for the elderly, low-income home owners 
of the Gainsboro community in Roanoke, 
Virginia. The book discusses previous re- 
development strategies for the area and 
offers alternative strategies for infill 
housing and renovation. 



To produce a handbook on community- 
directed design improvements. 



To draft design plans for the rehabilita- 
tion of abandoned houses in preparation 
for the Great House Homesteading Sale. 
During the sale, buyers use the design 
plans to negotiate rehabilitation loans 
from banks. 



To produce a workshop on design issues 
and alternatives for communities faced 
with rapid growth and development as a 
result of the industrialization of their nat- 
ural resources. 



To perform research for a film on the 
problem of displacement in neighborhood 
revitalization. The work of Savannah 
Landmarks Rehabilitation served as a 
case study. 



To provide technical assistance to local 
planning commissions to help them rec- 
ognize elements of good design. 



ZEAL 

FY 1979 

$12,453 

92^235-133 

Contact: Project Director, 

Architects/Communities, 

ZEAL, 52 East Main 

Street, Zeeland, Ml 49464 



To conduct an architect-in-residence pro- 
gram to educate the citizens of Zeeland, 
Michigan, about design and the environ- 
ment in preparation for the development 
of downtown and neighborhood improve- 
ment plans. A booklet documented the 
program. 



Promoting Multicultural Diversity 

Projects that highlight the design contributions of Ameri- 
ca's diverse multicultural groups. Includes rebuilt neighbor- 
hoods and restored historic buildings. 



Alabama Agricultural and 

Mechanical University 

FY 1986 

$5,000 

86-4257-0018 

Contact: Vice-President, 

Research and Development, 

Alabama Agricultural and 

Mechanical University, RO. 

Box 285, Normal, AL 

35762 



Albuquerque Conservation 

Association 

FY 1987 

$25,000 

87-4251-0082 

Contact: Treasurer, 

Albuquerque Conservation 

Association, RO. Box 946, 

Albuquerque, NM 87103 



Asian Neighborhood Design 

FY 1981 

$30,000 

12-4230-244 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Asian Neighborhood 

Design, 576 Vallejo Street, 

San Francisco, CA 94133 



Asian Neighborhood Design 
FY 1983 
$20,000 
32-4250-00099 
Contact: Director, Asian 
Neighborhood Design, 576 
Vallejo Street, San 
Francisco, CA 94133 



For a design competition to revitalize Al- 
abama Agricultural and Mechanical 
University, a land grant university estab- 
lished in 1 890. The aims were to design a 
park, a state black archive and a center 
for Afro-American history and research, 
and to redesign the historic Afro-Ameri- 
can Museum. 



To produce a book and traveling photo- 
graphic exhibition on the historical roots, 
present status and necessity of preserving 
northern New Mexico's traditional adobe 
religious structures, capillas and 
moradas. 



To demonstrate economically feasible, 
socially sensitive and aesthetically pleas- 
ing interior design solutions possible in 
dense urban cores where low-income and 
minority residents live in substandard 
housing. Inside Chinatown- A Booklet on 
the Design Demonstration Project 
documented the effort. 



To produce a series of bilingual bro- 
chures, presentations, workshops, com- 
munity events and home improvement 
articles in the Chinese Times. The aim 
was to inform residents of San Francis- 
co's Chinatown about design options for 
small living spaces. 



DESIGN FOR COMMUNITIES 57 



Asian Neighborhood Design 

FY 1984 

$30,000 

42-4252-0097 

Contact: Director, Asian 

Neighborhood Design, 576 

Vallejo Street, San 

Francisco, CA 94133 



Association of 

Neighborhood Housing 

Developers, Inc. 

FY 1983 

$20,755 

32-4250-00026 

Contact: Project Director, 

Association of 

Neighborhood Housing 

Developers, Inc., 424 West 

33rd Street, New York, NY 

10001 



Black Archives, History and 

Research Foundation of 

South Florida, Inc. 

FY 1984 

$17,000 

42-4231-0017 

Contact: Chairman, Black 

Archives, History and 

Research Foundation of 

South Florida, Inc., 5400 

N.W. 22nd Avenue, Miami, 

FL 33142 



Center for Community 

Studies, Inc. 

FY 1987 

$14,500 

87-4251-0018 

Contact: Vice-President, 

Center for Community 

Studies, Inc., 70 Mulberry, 

Second Floor, New York, 

NY 10013 



Chinatown Neighborhood 

Improvement Resource 

Center 

FY 1978 

$15,000 

R8042-158 

Contact: Chinatown 

Neighborhood Improvement 

Resource Center, 615 Grant 

Avenue, Second Floor, San 

Francisco, CA 94108 



City of Atlanta 

FY 1977 

$11,200 

R70-42-74 

Contact: Bureau of Cultural 

Affairs, Omni International, 

Suite 520 North, Atlanta, 

GA 30303 



To research and develop design guide- 
lines for affordable facilities in China- 
town, where low-income residents are be- 
ing displaced by new development and 
condominium conversion. 



To produce a documentary film, We Live 
Here/Vivimos Aqui, focusing on 934 
Barretto Street, a South Bronx apart- 
ment house with its own tenants' associa- 
tion. The film examines the reasons why 
neighborhoods change and the role com- 
munity residents can play in influencing 
their physical settings. 



To develop a plan and design guidelines 
for the revitalization of Overtown, a 
black neighborhood in Miami, Florida. 
The neighborhood's architecture reflects 
the Caribbean and African influences of 
Miami's black community as well as the 
art deco trends of the 1940s and 1950s. 



To conduct a preservation study for New 
York's Chinatown. The aim was to de- 
velop a planning context for Chinatown 
that places value on its history, continu- 
ity and tradition rather than succumbs to 
development pressures. 



To formulate an open-space master plan 
for alleyways in San Francisco's China- 
town and to develop alternative designs 
and cost estimates for several pilot 
projects. 



To complete design documents and mod- 
els for the renovation of the historic 
Knowles Building as a community mu- 
seum. The aims were to provide a home 
for Atlanta University's Afro-American 
art collections and provide cultural and 
educational programs for the community. 



City of Cleveland, Ohio 
FY 1979 
$12,500 
92-4233-237 
Contact: Director, 
Cleveland Landmarks 
Commission, City Hall, 
Room 28, Cleveland, OH 
44114 



City of Evansville 

FY 1977 

$11,040 

R70^2-187 

Contact: Director, 

Department of Metropolitan 

Development, City of 

Evansville, Civic Center, 

Evansville, IN 47708 



City of New Orleans 
FY 1977 
$17,000 
R70-42-I99CN 
Contact: City of New 
Orleans, Vieux Carre 
Commission, 630 Chartres 
Street, New Orleans, LA 
70130 



City of Valdese 

FY 1977 

$8,350 

R70-42-127 

Contact: Mayor, City of 

Valdese, City Hall, Valdese, 

NC 28690 



Claremore College 
Foundation, Inc. 
FY 1980 
$30,000 
02-4240-004 
Contact: Program 
Consultant, Claremore 
College Foundation, Inc., 
College Hill, Claremore, 
OK 74017 



Community Design Center 

Directors' Association 

FY 1982 

$18,500 

22-4250-129 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Community Design Center 

Directors' Association, 2146 

Georgia Avenue, N.W., 

Second Floor, Washington, 

DC 2000! 



To draft a master plan for the preserva- 
tion of Cleveland's unique chain of cul- 
tural gardens, each of which is dedicated 
to a specific ethnic group, located in 
Rockefeller Park. A report documented 
the plan. 



To frame revitalization plans and restora- 
tion standards for the four-block German 
community, the oldest neighborhood 
shopping area in Evansville, Indiana. A 
study report was issued. 



To expand the scope of the conference, 
"Latin Roots in the Built Environments 
of the South and Southwest," sponsored 
by the Vieux Carre Commission in New 
Orleans. 



To plan and design a town center im- 
provement program for Valdese, North 
Carolina. The plan emphasized the Wal- 
densian heritage of the city's nineteenth- 
century founders. 



To design the National Native American 
Heritage Educational Cultural Center in 
cooperation with the Rogers County 
Cherokee Association. 



For the National Conference on Partici- 
patory Design Processes for Low-Income 
and Minority Communities. The aims 
were to expand neighborhood self-help 
activities and to encourage designers to 
use participatory design processes in lo- 
cal community projects. A report and 
booklet were issued. 



58 CHAPTER ONE 



East Los Angeles 

Community Union 

FY 1979 

$20,000 

92-4233-067 

Contact: East Los Angeles 

Community Union, 5327 

Valley Boulevard, Los 

Angeles, CA 90032 



Evanston Community 

Development Corporation 

FY 1979 

$9,185 

92^212-040 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Evanston Community 

Development Corporation, 

1817 Church Street. 

Evanston, IL 60201 



Fly, Everett L. 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

9M232-101 

Contact: RO. Box 1012, 

Austin, TX 78767 



Hayden, Dolores 

FY 1987 

$10,000 

87-4216-0039 

Contact: Rural Route PO. 

Box 1 29. West Cornwall, 

CT 06796 



Historic Salem, Inc. 

FY 1978 

$9,775 

R8a42-87 

Contact: Historic Salem, 

Inc.. RO. Box 865, Salem, 

MA 01970 



Iowa, Jay 

FY 1977 

$6,500 

R71-42-18N 

Contact: RO. Box 2631, 

Santa Fe, NM 87501 



Iowa, Jeremiah 

FY 1979 

$9,900 

91-4232-104 

Contact: RO. Box 263 1 , 

Santa Fe, NM 87501 



To survey sites of cultural and historical 
significance in East Los Angeles. The 
aim was to create a greater awareness of 
cultural heritage among community resi- 
dents. A three-volume survey and nomi- 
nations to the National Register of His- 
toric Places were generated. 



To perform research for a publication on 
the architecturally significant structures 
located in Evanston's west side, a historic 
black community. A folder of informa- 
tional materials on the project was pro- 
duced. 



To expand a national study documenting 
the roles of black people and settlements 
in the dynamics of the development of 
the American landscape, townscape and 
cityscape. A 100-page report was pro- 
duced. 



To write a book about the Power of 
Place, a project celebrating the history 
and achievements of blacks, Latinos, 
Asian-Americans and women. The aim 
was to show how the experiences of ordi- 
nary working people of all ages and eth- 
nic backgrounds can be represented in 
public places of historic significance. 



To devise a citywide sign system identi- 
fying sites of ethnic-group achievements 
in the varied neighborhoods of Salem, 
Massachusetts. 



To restore the historic plaza of Nambe, 
New Mexico, for use as housing. The res- 
toration process involved community par- 
ticipation, and the incorporation of pas- 
sive solar energy systems was a goal of 
the project. 



To continue research on a planning, de- 
sign and coordination project for the 
Pueblo village of Nambe in New Mex- 
ico. Three reports documented the 
project. 



Iowa State University 

FY 1981 

$20,000 

12-4252-040 

Contact: Rrofessor, Iowa 

State University, 

Department of 

Architecture, Ames, lA 

50011 



Kansas State Historical 

Society 

FY 1983 

$30,000 

32-4230-00171 

Contact: State Historical 

Preservation Officer, Kansas 

State Historical Society, 

120 West 10th Street, 

Topeka, KS 66612 



Kim, Susie S. 

FY 1980 

$7,500 

01-4210-035 

Contact: 52 Towbridge 

Street, Cambridge, MA 

02138 



Metropolitan Arts Council 

FY 1981 

$7,400 

12-4250-030 

Contact: Project Director, 

Metropolitan Arts Council. 

RO. Box 1077 D.T.S., 

Omaha, NE 68101 



Milwaukee Inner City Arts 

Council 

FY 1984 

$36,056 

42-4256-0062 

Contact: Associate Director, 

University of Wisconsin, 

Graduate School, 

Milwaukee, WI 53201 



Morgan State University 
FY 1980 
$30,000 
02-4230-097 
Contact: Associate 
Professor, Morgan State 
University, Built 
Environment Studies, 
Baltimore, MD 21239 



For a study on the art and architecture 
of Mexican and Central American cul- 
tures prior to the Spanish conquests. Par- 
ticular emphasis was placed on the blend 
of art and nature present in unrestored 
Mayan centers. The project was 
documented in a report, Mesoamerica, 
and photographs. 



To study the original town plans, oral 
histories and historic structures reports 
for Nicodemus, Kansas. The community, 
now a National Historic Landmark dis- 
trict, was founded by freed slaves during 
the 1 870s Exoduster movement. A video, 
"Promised Land on the Solomon: Black 
Settlement at Nicodemus," and a his- 
toric preservation report were produced. 



To research and prepare a brochure 
demonstrating how urban design tech- 
niques can be used to help preserve and 
enrich culturally diverse neighborhoods, 
specifically Chinatown in Boston. A 
project summary, "Little City Within a 
City: Chinatown, Boston," was produced. 



To produce an exhibition entitled If 
Buildings Could Talk. The exhibit stud- 
ied the architectural history of North 
Omaha, Nebraska, a predominantly 
black community rich in architectural, 
cultural and social history. 



To produce a videotape documentary 
and a publication about historic black 
communities in the United States. The 
aim was to record and preserve the his- 
toric features of these settlements. 



To develop a neighborhood design plan 
for Baltimore's Middle-Eastern commu- 
nity. The process involved the Middle- 
Eastern Community Organization, the 
Neighborhood Design Center and Mor- 
gan State University's Research Center 
for the Built Environment. A project re- 
port summarized the plan. 



DESIGN FOR COMMUNITIES 59 



Museum of Afro-American 
History 
FY 1977 
$10,000 
R70-42-36 

Contact: Special Projects 
Director, Museum of Afro- 
American History, 2276 
Washington Street, 
Roxbury, MA 02119 



Museum of Afro-American 

History 

FY 1978 

$14,200 

R80-42-48N 

Contact: President, Museum 

of Afro-American History, 

Box 322, Smith Court, 

Boston, MA 021 14 



Museum of New Mexico 

FY 1980 

$20,000 

02-4250-128 

Contact: Project Director, 

Museum of New Mexico, 

PO. Box 2087, Sante Fe, 

NM 87503 



To produce an exhibit, What Time Is 
This Station? (Tomorrow), dealing with 
the place and importance of the Dudley 
Street Station in the Roxbury commu- 
nity. 



National Council for Equal 

Business Opportunity, Inc. 

FY 1977 

$19,275 

R70-42-137 

Contact: President, National 

Council for Equal Business 

Opportunity, Inc., 121 1 

Connecticut Avenue, N.W., 

Washington, DC 20036 



National Trust for Historic 
Preservation 
FY 1980 
$10,000 
02-4250-228 
Contact: Assistant Vice- 
President, National Trust 
for Historic Preservation, 
1785 Massachusetts 
Avenue, N.W., Washington, 
DC 20036 



New Mexico Community 

Foundation 

FY 1987 

$30,000 

87-4251-0126 

Contact: President, New 

Mexico Community 

Foundation. 224 West 

Manhattan Avenue, Santa 

Fc, NM 87501 



To conduct a design study and archeo- 
logical survey for the restoration of 
Smith Court and its connecting alley- 
ways. Smith Court was the center of Bos- 
ton's Afro-American community in the 
nineteenth century. 



To study Native American architecture 
and town planning over the past 100 
years. A video, "The Center Space: 
Pueblo Indian Architecture," showed 
how Pueblo society shaped its environ- 
mental form and the variety of ap- 
proaches to environmental design used 
today as tools in cultural conservation 
and adaptation. A $20,000 amendment, 
grant number 1 2-4250-9004, was made 
in 1981. 



To provide professional development ser- 
vices to Spanish-speaking artists and 
craftspersons involved in the revitaliza- 
tion of San Francisco's Mission district 
and Philadelphia's Fifth Street neighbor- 
hood. 



To host the Historic Preservation and 
Minority Conference, focused on the ex- 
panding relationship of the historic pres- 
ervation movement and minority commu- 
nities. 



To survey the historic adobe churches in 
south central New Mexico, an area that 
was the original route of the Spanish 
Franciscan friars who founded the early 
missions. The purposes were to prepare 
preservation plans and produce a list of 
resources available to communities. 



New Mexico Community 

Foundation 

FY 1986 

$35,000 

86-4256-0097 

Contact: President, New 

Mexico Community 

Foundation, 224 West 

Manhattan Avenue, Santa 

Fe, NM 87501 



Partners for Livable Places 

FY 1985 

$10,000 

52-4256-0044 

Contact: President, Partners 

for Livable Places, 1429 

21st Street, N.W., 

Washington, DC 20036 



Philadelphia Chinatown 

Development Corporation 

FY 1979 

$10,975 

92-4233-125 

Contact: Project Director, 

Philadelphia Chinatown 

Development Corporation, 

217 North 10th Street, 

Philadelphia, PA 19107 



Philadelphia Chinatown 

Development Corporation 

FY 1981 

$15,000 

12-4230-189 

Contact: Project Director, 

Philadelphia Chinatown 

Development Corporation, 

217 North 10th Street, 

Philadelphia, PA 19107 



Japanese Village 
Plaza in Los Angeles. 
California, was built 
by merchants espe- 
cially for the Japa- 
nese community. 
Built to human scale 
and reflective of the 
ethnic culture, the 
plaza has helped to 
revitalize a once- 
declining area. 



For a survey of historic Catholic 
churches of northern New Mexico. The 
aims were to assist communities in for- 
mulating repair programs and construc- 
tion priorities and to develop a national 
preservation campaign. A survey and re- 
ports on five communities' experiences in 
preserving adobe churches were pro- 
duced. 



To develop support for Spanish Legacies 
in the Built Environment, an exhibit for 
the 1992 Columbian Anniversary. The 
planning process included a scholarly re- 
view board, institutional sponsors and 
Hispanic organizations. 



To prepare a design plan with the aim of 
improving neighborhood visibility and 
identity. A report on the effort was pro- 
duced. 



For a revitalization plan for Philadel- 
phia's Chinatown. The plan covered de- 
sign guidelines for rehabilitation and new 
construction and recommendations for 
facade treatments, signs, street furniture 
and lighting. 




60 CHAPTER ONE 



Philadelphia Chinatown 
Development Corporation 
FY 1986 
$30,000 
8^4231-0073 
Contact: President, 
Philadelphia Chinatown 
Development Corporation, 
101 1 Race Street, 
Philadelphia. PA 19107 



Poodry, Deborah W. 

FY 1982 

$5,000 

2 M2 12-086 

Contact: Planner, Boston 

Public Schools, 1 1 

Grampian Way, Boston, 

MA 02125 



Portuguese Heritage 

Foundation 

FY 1977 

$20,000 

R7a42-I02 

Conlacl: President, 

Portuguese Heritage 

Foundation, 64 Durfee 

Street, Fall River, MA 

02720 



Power of Place 

FY 1987 

$25,000 

87-4251-0120 

Contact: President, The 

Power of Place, 83 1 8 

Ridpath Drive, Los Angeles, 

CA 90046 



Pueblo of Zuni 

FY 1982 

$30,000 

22-4230012 

Contact: Comprehensive 

Planning Director, Pueblo of 

Zuni, RO. Box 339, Zuni, 

NM 87327 



Puerto Rican Workshop, 

Inc. 

FY 1984 

$22,925 

42-4231-0072 

Contact: Chairman, Puerto 

Rican Workshop, Inc., One 

East 104th Street, New 

York. NY 10029 



For a feasibility study to determine 
whether Chinatown North, a blighted in- 
dustrial area, can be used as a site for 
housing, commercial and recreational 
uses for the Chinatown community. An 
urban design study and plan were pro- 
duced. 



To draft a design and development pro- 
gram and to acquire funds for construc- 
tion of a new facility for the Boston In- 
dian Council. The council focuses, 
defines and draws together diverse cul- 
tural patterns within the Indian commu- 
nity. 



To convert the historic Academy build- 
ing in Fall River, Massachusetts, into a 
Portuguese heritage museum and cul- 
tural center. 



To support a designer-artist collaboration 
to create a new pedestrian passageway in 
downtown Los Angeles. The passageway 
was to traverse an Afro-American his- 
toric site and connect a National Regis- 
ter Historic District, a new park, a lively 
Hispanic commercial street and a major 
retail complex. 



To develop detailed design plans for the 
Museum of the Zuni People. The pur- 
pose was to create an institution that ex- 
presses Zuni culture, educates tourists 
and transmits tribal culture to future 
generations. A film and report were pro- 
duced. 



To plan the renovation of a vacant five- 
story building in Spanish Harlem for use 
as a Hispanic artists' resource and cul- 
tural center. The plan included housing 
for artists, gallery space, an area for pub- 
lic service programs and a cafe-restau- 
rant. A videotape and project summary 
were produced. 



Savannah Landmark 

Rehabilitation Project, Inc. 

FY 1979 

$2,633 

92-4212-053 

Contact: Assistant Director, 

Savannah Landmark 

Rehabilitation Project, Inc., 

PO. Box 8801, Savannah, 

GA 31402 



Savannah State College 
FY 1985 
$5,590 
52-4231-0031 
Contact: President, 
Savannah State College, 
PO. Box 20482, Savannah, 
GA 31404 



Shao, Paul R W. 

FY 1981 

$8,500 

11-4213-105 

Contact: 3208 Ross Road, 

Ames, I A 50010 



To publish a monthly newsletter. Savan- 
nah Landmark News. The newsletter fo- 
cused on architectural design and pres- 
ervation issues facing Savannah's low- 
income, predominantly black 
neighborhood. 



Sheldon Jackson College 

FY 1982 

$16,812 

22^230^33 

Contact: Museum Director, 

Sheldon Jackson Museum, 

Sitka, AK 99835 



Silva, Irene 

FY 1977 

$3,600 

R71-42-34N 

Contact: 6427 S.W. 30th 

Street, Miami, FL 33155 



Smith, Philip Q. 

FY 1985 

$7,500 

5M213-0152 

Contact: 1404 Jefferson 

Street, Nashville, TN 37208 



Torre, Susana 

FY 1986 

$10,000 

86-4213-0051 

Contact: Columbia 

University, Graduate School 

of Architecture, Avery Hall, 

New York, NY 10027 



For planning to rehabilitate Walter B. 
Hill Hall. The building is a symbolic 
landmark of Georgia's black community 
and one of the original buildings at Sa- 
vannah State College, the first publicly 
supported state college for blacks in 
Georgia. A report and slides documented 
the project. 



To study pseudo-Chinese architecture in 
America and pseudo-American architec- 
ture in China. Cultural identity and de- 
sign integrity in China and in American 
Chinatowns has been threatened by Chi- 
na's modernization drive and the in- 
creased mobility of Chinese-Americans. 



To plan and design the renovation and 
expansion of the Sheldon Jackson Mu- 
seum, the home of one of the finest col- 
lections of Alaskan Indian and Eskimo 
artifacts in the United States. 



To establish a design clinic to benefit 
low- to moderate-income families in one 
of Miami's Cuban-American neighbor- 
hoods. 



To identify the historically significant 
buildings in the small town of Bessemer, 
Alabama. The study focused on Dunbar 
High School, erected in 1922 as the Bes- 
semer Colored High School, a building 
that is important both architecturally 
and educationally. 



To study the significant and enduring in- 
fluences of Hispanic culture on Ameri- 
can architecture and to produce a publi- 
cation and exhibit on the subject. 



DESIGN FOR COMMUNITIES 6 1 



Trustees of Columbia 

University in the City of 

New York 

FY 1986 

$18,000 

86-4256-0156 

Contact: Project Officer, 

Columbia University, PO. 

Box 20, Low Memorial 

Library, New York, NY 

10027 



United Indians of All Tribes 

Foundation 

FY 1979 

$5,000 

92-4211-034 

Contact: Executive Director, 

United Indians of All Tribes 

Foundation, 1515 Dextro 

Horton Building, Seattle, 

WA 98104 



University of New Mexico 

FY 1982 

$15,000 

22^250-063 

Contact: Senior Editor, 

University of New Mexico 

Press, University of New 

Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 

87131 



To produce an exhibition that examines 
the influence of Hispanic traditions on 
buildings and technologies in California, 
the Southwest and Florida, areas that 
were once a part of New Spain. 



Van Purnell, Ernest D. 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R71-42-48N 

Contact: 423 Evergreen 

Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 

70806 



Zuni Pueblo 

FY 1978 

$15,000 

R8(M2-144 

Contact: Mimbres & 

Associates, Zuni Pueblo, 

Zuni, NM 87327 



To design a traditional north-coast-style 
longhouse and to construct a national In- 
dian cultural education center for the 
preservation and transmission of Native 
American culture. 



To produce a book entitled Pueblo Deco: 
The Art Deco Architecture of the South- 
west. The book traces the influence of 
Hispanic and American Indian motifs 
and provides design guidelines for archi- 
tectural preservation of this style in the 
Southwest. It was published in 1984 and 
coauthored by Marcus Whiff"en and 
Caria Breeze. 



For a comparative analysis of residential 
building types traditionally used by eth- 
nic subcultural groups in southern Los 
Angeles. A summary report was issued. 



To produce a detailed study for a work- 
ing museum of Zuni culture in order to 
determine feasibility, scope of activities, 
design requirements and potential fund- 
ing sources. Slides and a report 
documented the project. 



Public Places 

Preservation projects and design competitions for the focal 
points of community life, such as plazas, town squares and 
markets. 



Attoe, Wayne O. 

FY 1980 

$10,000 

0M213-160 

Contact: 2597 Buena Vista 

Way, Berkeley, CA 94708 



Bacon, Karin 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R8M2-8N 

Contact: 349 West End 

Avenue, New York, NY 

10024 



Boston Children's Museum 

FY 1982 

$19,260 

22-4230-193 

Contact: Director, Boston 

Children's Museum, 

Museum Wharf, 300 

Congress Street, Boston, 

MA 02210 



Boston Redevelopment 

Authority 

FY 1983 

$100,000 

32-423000183 

Contact: Program Manager, 

Boston Redevelopment 

Authority, One City Hall 

Square, Boston, MA 02201 



Brill, Michael 

FY 1985 

$15,000 

51-4213-0001 

Contact: 35! Woodward 

Avenue. Bufralo, NY 14214 



Burke. Padraic 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R71-42-13N 

Contact: College of 

Architecture, University of 

Washington, Seattle, WA 

98195 



For research on toy-like towns, places 
that possess a playtime fantasy dimen- 
sion. The aims were to analyze a number 
of such towns around the world and to 
discuss the phenomenon of play and the 
opportunities these towns provide adults 
to play. 



To develop a multimedia presentation il- 
lustrating the ways in which Americans 
use public spaces for their rituals and 
celebrations. 



For plans and landscape architectural de- 
signs for a public park adjacent to the 
Children's Museum and the Museum of 
Transportation. The project was a major 
component of the redevelopment of Bos- 
ton's waterfront. 



To host a national design competition for 
Boston's Copley Square, one of the na- 
tion's most important historic open 
spaces. Through workshops and public 
meetings the Copley Square Centennial 
Committee has developed a strong con- 
sensus in support of redesigning the 
square. A report containing jury tran- 
scripts was issued. 



To examine myths of creation and their 
presence in archetypal sacred space and 
to exploring the design of "charged 
spaces" — places that possess a certain 
power — and of "embraced places," 
smaller, natural places that exercise such 
an efl"ect. Slides and a research report 
were produced. 



To study the evolution and decline of the 
urban public market in America, provid- 
ing a historical account and recommen- 
dations on the potential for preservation. 



62 CHAPTER ONE 



Catholic University of 

America 

FY 1982 

$25,000 

22-4250-127 

Contact: Chairman. 

Department of Architecture. 

Catholic University of 

America. 610 Michigan 

Avenue, N.E., Washington, 

DC 20064 



Center for Design Planning 

FY 1981 

$5,000 

12-4250025 

Contact: Project Director, 

Center for Design Planning, 

3695 St. Gaudens Road, 

Coconut Grove, FL 33133 



City of Charlottesville 

FY 1979 

$4,000 

92-4211-009 

Contact: City Manager, 

City of Charlottesville, PO. 

Box 911, Charlottesville, 

VA 22902 



City of Jersey City 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R70-42-7B 

Contact: City of Jersey 

City, 280 Grove Street, 

Jersey City, NJ 07302 



City of Manhattan 

FY 1981 

$30,000 

12-4230-001 

Contact: Coordinator, 

Downtown Redevelopment, 

City Hall, 1 1th and Poyntz 

Avenues, Manhattan, KS 

66502 



City of New Orleans 
FY 1977 
$40,860 
R7a42-10B 

Contact: Director, Vieux 
Carre Commission, 630 
Chartres Street, New 
Orleans, LA 70130 



To produce an exhibit on covered pedes- 
trian arcades and walkways. The exhibit 
explored examples such as St. Peter's 
and St. Mark's squares in Italy and ap- 
plied the principles to American down- 
towns. 



To produce a pictorial history of arcades, 
gallerias, colonnades and canopies 
throughout the history of urbanization. 



To investigate the adaptive reuse poten- 
tial of the Chesapeake and Ohio Rail- 
road Station in Charlottesville, Virginia, 
as a community facility — a city market 
including a farmers' market and com- 
mercial vendors. A feasibility report was 
issued. 



To plan improvements to Journal Square 
in Jersey City, New Jersey. The aim was 
to create a public amenity and a focus of 
community pride. 



To plan streetscape design, cultural ac- 
tivities centers in public open spaces and 
facade improvements as part of the re- 
development of Poyntz Avenue, the main 
street of Manhattan, Kansas. Several re- 
ports and a nomination to the National 
Register were generated from the 
project. 



To design fountains with animated wa- 
ter — decorative, humanizing and visually 
delightful elements in cities — for the 
Louis Armstrong Park and Cultural Cen- 
ter site in New Orleans. 



City of Portsmouth 
FY 1977 
$10,820 
R70-42-126 
Contact: Director of 
Planning, City of 
Portsmouth, One High 
Street, Portsmouth, VA 
23704 



Charlotte Nature Museum 
FY 1980 
$13,000 
02-4230-087 
Contact: Director, The 
Charlotte Nature Museum, 
1658 Sterling Road, 
Charlotte, NC 28209 



Contemporary Arts Center 
FY 1986 
$25,000 
86-4231-0070 
Contact: Chairman, 
Contemporary Arts Center, 
1 1 5 East Fifth Street, 
Cincinnati, OH 45202 



East Tennessee Community 

Design Center 

FY 1979 

$21,000 

92-4233-068 

Contact: Project Director, 

East Tennessee Community 

Design Center, 1522 

Highland Avenue, 

Knoxville, TN 37916 



Etlin, Richard A. 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

91-4232-159 

Contact: 438 North 

Broadway, Lexington, KY 

40508 



Eubanks, Patsy L. 

FY 1985 

$5,000 

51-4213-0054 

Contact: 2425 Fulton Street, 

Apt. 12, Berkeley, CA 

94704 



Four Freedoms Foundation 

FY 1979 

$30,000 

92-4235-264 

Contact: President, Four 

Freedoms Foundation, 312 

East 51st Street, New York, 

NY 10020 



To conduct an architectural design study 
for historic Afton Square in Portsmouth, 
Virginia. The study included structural 
and market analyses as well as plans for 
exterior improvements to structures in 
the square, parking facilities, open spaces 
and landscaping. Slides and a report 
were produced. 



To design the Discovery Garden, an 
arena for public interaction, exhibition, 
education and performance on 60,000 
square feet of city-owned space adjacent 
to the Charlotte Nature Museum. 



For the design of permanent site installa- 
tion at the entrance of Sawyer Point 
Park, the symbolic transition point be- 
tween the Ohio River and downtown 
Cincinnati. Artists, architects, and de- 
signers were invited to submit plans. 



To develop an inner-city circulation and 
open-space system for Knoxville, Tennes- 
see. The aim was to demonstrate that the 
inner city can be livable, energy-efficient 
and workable. Several reports 
documented the three phases of the 
project. 



To complete a book entitled The Ar- 
chitecture of Death, a history of the evo- 
lution of cemetery architecture, pub- 
lished by M.I.T. Press. 



To explore the relationship between the 
values and needs of teenagers and the de- 
sign of public places. Similar research 
has been conducted for young children 
and the elderly and has produced great 
improvements in the design of facilities. 



To plan a full-scale capital campaign for 
Louis L Kahn's memorial to Franklin 
Delano Roosevelt on Roosevelt Island in 
New York City and to produce a slide 
show and promotional materials on the 
project's history. 



DESIGN FOR COMMUNITIES 63 



Fourteenth Street Union 

Square Local Development 

Corporation 

FY 1985 

$10,000 

52-4231-0020 

ConlacI: Executive Director, 

Fourteenth Street Union 

Square Local Development 

Corporation, 124 East 15th 

Street, New York, NY 

10003 



Friends of Logan Square 

Foundation 

FY 1985 

$15,000 

52-4231-0089 

ConlacI: President, Friends 

of Logan Square 

Foundation, 19th and 

Parkway, Logan Square 

South, c/o Academy of 

Natural Sciences, 

Philadelphia, PA 19103 



Gill, Susan P 

FY 1984 

$10,000 

41-4213-00011 

Conlaci: 40 1 

Commonwealth Avenue, 

Boston, MA 02215 



Georgia Tech Research 
Institute/Georgia Institute 
of Technology 
FY 1983 
$30,390 
32-4252-00053 
Contact: Contracting 
Officer, Georgia Tech 
Research Institute/Georgia 
Institute of Technology, 
Atlanta, GA 30332 



Greater Washington 

Educational 

Telecommunications 

Association/ WETA 

FY 1983 

$30,000 

32-4250-00106 

Contact: President, WETA, 

Box 2626, Washington, DC 

20013 



Hirsch, David L. 

FY 1981 

$10,000 

11-4210-017 

Contact: 1 1 1 West 57th 

Street, New York, NY 

10019 



To provide structures of lightweight can- 
vas and steel frame to house amenities 
such as a crafts market, book market 
and flower market in Greenmarket, a 
large farmers' market located at the 
north end of Union Square in Manhat- 
tan. 



To restore and install hydraulic and 
lighting systems for the Swann Memorial 
Fountain, located at Benjamin Franklin 
Parkway and Logan Square in Philadel- 
phia. The fountain was designed by ar- 
chitect Wilson Eyre and sculptor Alexan- 
der Calder and built between 1917 and 
1924. It is registered as a National His- 
toric Landmark. 



To research and write a book that ex- 
plores how the spaces we design for 
play — for children and adults — reflect 
our culture and transmit cultural values. 



For a study to determine the role archi- 
tectural devices (for instance level 
changes, steps, benches, trees) play in 
controlling how people use and experi- 
ence public open spaces such as city 
parks and plazas. The aim was to provide 
a base of knowledge for the design of fu- 
ture civic spaces. 



To produce a half-hour documentary 
film on the conflict between artistic pro- 
cesses and popular demands as illus- 
trated by the design and construction of 
the Vietnam War Veterans' Memorial. 
The national public dialogue that took 
place was unprecedented in the history 
of architectural competitions. 



To conduct a post-construction evalua- 
tion of six urban malls to consider factors 
such as the relationship among govern- 
ments, merchants and designers; the 
malls' effects on neighboring areas and 
the responsibilities of the private sector. 



Historic Oakland Cemetery 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

92-4233-071 

Contact: Project Director, 

Historic Oakland Cemetery, 

248 Oakland Avenue, S.E.. 

Atlanta, GA 30312 



Kent State University 
FY 1985 
$85,000 
52-4257-0157 
Contact: Kent State 
University, Research and 
Sponsored Programs, 233 
Lowry Hall, Kent, OH 
44242 



Kwartler, Michael 

FY 1980 

$10,000 

01-4213-171 

Conlaci: 116-118 West 29th 

Street, New York, NY 

10001 



To produce a master plan for the restora- 
tion, interpretation and multiple use of 
Oakland Cemetery, a large Victorian ru- 
ral cemetery in Atlanta's inner city. 



Liga Estudiantes de Arte de 

San Juan, Inc. 

FY 1985 

$15,500 

52-5256-0104 

Contact: President, Liga 

Estudiantes de Arte de San 

Juan, Inc., Box 5181, Puerta 

de Tierra, San Juan, PR 

00906 



To hold a national competition for the 
design of a memorial commemorating 
the events at Kent State University on 
May 4, 1970, in which four students 
were killed and nine wounded by Na- 
tional Guardsmen in a campus dem- 
onstration protesting the war in Vietnam. 



To investigate the issues arising from 
planned community development and 
common public space in Sunnyside Gar- 
dens, a moderate-income housing devel- 
opment on Long Island designed by 
Stein and Wright in 1924. Two articles 
were produced: "Sunnyside Gardens: 
The Politics of Common Open Space" 
and "Sunnyside Gardens: Whose Land Is 
It Anyway?" 



To produce two handbooks dealing with 
urban history, plaza design and architec- 
tural conservation in Puerto Rico. The 
aim was to counteract the negative ef- 
fects of new uses and added functions on 
many historic plazas. 




St. Louis Union Station, a National Historic Landmarl<. was once 
a busy passenger rail terminal. Now restored with great care, it 
houses a hotel, exhibit space and a festival market. 



64 CHAPTER ONE 



Lim, Dcbra C. 

FY 1986 

$5,000 

8M213-OI21 

Contact: 945 South Curson, 

Apt. I, Los Angeles. CA 

90036 



Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology Press 

FY 1984 

$15,000 

42-4256-00004 

Contact: 28 Carleton Street, 

Cambridge, MA 02142 



Municipal Art Society 

FY 1984 

$15,000 

42^256-0052 

Contact: 457 Madison 

Avenue, New York, NY 

10022 



New England Aquarium 

Corporation 

FY 1980 

$30,000 

02-4254-003 

Contact: Central Wharf, 

Boston, MA 021 10 



North Carolina Arts 

Council 

FY 1986 

$15,000 

86-4231-0011 

Contact: North Carolina 

Arts Council, Department 

of Cultural Resources, 

Raleigh, NC 27611 



Otis Art Institute of Parsons 

School of Design 

FY 1985 

$35,000 

52-4256-0119 

Contact: 2401 Wilshire 

Boulevard. Los Angeles. CA 

90057 



Pershing Square 
Management Association 
FY 1985 
$40,000 
52-4257-0160 
Contact: 523 West Sixth 
Street, Suite 200, Los 
Angeles, C A 90014 



To outline a conceptual model for a new 
type of mall, the "L-Mall" or "learning 
mall," that explores possibilities for inte- 
grating learning and educational activi- 
ties into the retail shopping mall. 



To assist publication and distribution of 
a book entitled Cities of the Dead, a his- 
tory of the evolution of cemetery ar- 
chitecture. 



To produce an exhibit about cultural ac- 
tivities and events within walking dis- 
tance of the subway station at Fifth Ave- 
nue and 53rd Street in New York City. 



To implement a design for the plaza in 
front of the New England Aquarium in 
Boston. The plan combined kinetic sculp- 
ture, graphic design, landscape design 
and urban design. 



For Public Spaces/People Places, a con- 
sortium of twelve public and nonprofit 
organizations dedicated to encouraging 
sensitivity to the surrounding community 
and improving quality in the design of 
public places. 



To produce a book describing the 1984 
Olympic Design Project. The aim was to 
present this work as an example of an in- 
novative approach to the design of public 
spaces. 



To hold an international, interdisciplin- 
ary design competition for the rebuilding 
of historic Pershing Square as a symbolic 
center for the city of Los Angeles. A re- 
port and photographs documented the 
competition. 



Pershing Square 
Management Association 
FY 1987 
$20,000 
87-4251-0127 
Contact: 523 West Sixth 
Street, Suite 200, Los 
Angeles, C A 90014 



Pfeiffer, Norman 

FY 1979 

$15,000 

91-4232-085 

Contact: Hardy Holzman 

Pfeiffer, 257 Park Avenue 

South, New York, NY 

10010 



Pittsburgh History and 

Landmarks Foundation 

FY 1986 

$20,000 

86-4256-0146 

Contact: One Landmark 

Square, Pittsburgh, PA 

15212 



Project for Public Spaces 

FY 1977 

$5,000 

R70-42-41 

Contact: 875 Avenue of the 

Americas, New York, NY 

10001 



Project for Public Spaces 

FY 1978 

$5,000 

R80-42-54 

Contact: 875 Avenue of the 

Americas, New York, NY 

10001 



Project for Public Spaces 

FY 1980 

$10,000 

02-4250-137 

Contact: 875 Avenue of the 

Americas, New York, NY 

10001 



Project for Public Spaces 

FY 1986 

$12,000 

86-4252-0054 

Contact: 153 Waverly 

Place, New York, NY 

10014 



To publish the results of the open inter- 
national design competition held in 1986 
for Los Angeles's Pershing Square. The 
competition attracted 242 entries from 
twenty states, five Canadian provinces 
and seventeen foreign countries. 



To frame a development plan to pre- 
serve, restore and improve the existing 
system of pedestrian concourses and pas- 
sageways linking Grand Central Termi- 
nal and its rail facilities to the surround- 
ing area. 



To draft a reuse plan for the Panther 
Hollow area of Schenley Park in down- 
town Pittsburgh. The goal was to provide 
attractive, accessible and safe areas for 
recreational activities as part of the 
park's 100th anniversary in 1989. 



To produce a film and issue a report on 
the function and design of public office 
building plazas, including a case study of 
the Federal Office Building Plaza in Se- 
attle. 



To design a block improvement program 
for West 46th Street in Manhattan based 
on evaluations of pedestrian and vehicu- 
lar traffic, uses of retail frontage and us- 
ers' needs for orientation mechanisms. 



For a film intended to demonstrate to 
corporate executives the importance and 
value of public plazas: the benefits in 
terms of economics and in terms of a cor- 
poration's image in the community. 



To study ten cities to determine the fac- 
tors necessary for successful downtown 
public space design. A report, Successful 
Downtown Management, was produced. 



DESIGN FOR COMMUNITIES 65 



Research Foundation of the 

City University of New 

York 

FY 1978 

$24,020 

R8042-84 

Contact: Convert Avenue at 

138th Street, New York, 

NY 10031 



San Francisco Planning and 

Urban Research Association 

FY 1983 

$7,000 

32-425^00195 

Contact: 312 Sutter Street, 

San Francisco, CA 94108 



Town of Barnstable 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

92-4233-079 

Contact: Selectman, 397 

Main Street, Barnstable, 

MA 02601 



Townscape Institute 

FY 1982 

$18,642 

22-4250-156 

Contact: President, 

Townscape Institute, 2 

Hubbard Place, Cambridge, 

MA 02138 



Vergara, Camilo J. 

FY 1984 

$10,000 

41-4213-0150 

Con/af/. 535 West 110th 

Street, No. 2-1. New York, 

NY 10025 



Verman, Marvin 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R8M2-36N 

Contact: 2137 Naudain 

Street, Philadelphia, PA 

19146 



Vietnam Veterans Memorial 

Fund, Inc. 

FY 1980 

$5,000 

02-4230-220 

Contact: 1730 M Street, 

N.W., Suite 806, 

Washington, DC 20036 



To research and produce A Guide to 
New York City Open Spaces. The guide 
included listings of parks, plazas, streets, 
playgrounds and suggested walking 
tours. 



To create a film on increasing San Fran- 
cisco's public open space through the use 
of its low, flat-roofed buildings. The aims 
were to discover why the rooftop space 
has remained largely undeveloped and to 
show successful examples of rooftop 
parks, playgrounds and gardens. 



To design a pedestrian link between 
Barnstable's waterfront, main street, 
town hall and open-air theater, a human- 
scale amenity for residents and visitors. 



For a book entitled On Common Ground: 
Caring for Shared Land from Town 
Common to Urban Park. It was pub- 
lished in 1982 and coauthored by Ronald 
Lee Fleming and Lauri A. Haldeman. 



To prepare an exhibition of photographs, 
maps and texts analyzing and illustrating 
cemeteries and funerary monuments in 
urban areas. 



To evaluate thirty neighborhood squares 
in Philadelphia, to create a prototypical 
restoration plan for one square and to 
prepare general recommendations for the 
renovation of the others. 



To analyze fourteen sites for a memorial 
to Americans who died in the Vietnam 
War. A report documented the site selec- 
tion process. 



Vietnam Veterans Memorial 

Fund, Inc. 

FY 1981 

$15,000 

1 2-4230080 

Contact: 1110 Vermont 

Avenue, N.W., Suite 308, 

Washington, DC 20005 



Wasserman, Louis 

FY 1977 

$6,500 

R71-42-26N 

Contact: 2 1 5 Superior 

Avenue, Sheboygan, Wl 

53801 



William Shakespeare 

Company 

FY 1981 

$3,600 

12-4230-002 

Contact: RO. Box 786, 

Camden, ME 04843 



To support a national design competition 
for a national memorial in honor and rec- 
ognition of the men and women who 
served and died in the Vietnam War. 
The memorial is conceived of as a land- 
scape meditation garden and will make 
no political statement about the war. 



To conduct research on amusement and 
theme parks in the United States to eval- 
uate the eff"ectiveness of their design and 
functions. Two reports were published. 



To formulate a design solution to the 
conflicting requirements of two users of 
the Bok Amphitheater: one favors the re- 
tention of a park and garden feeling; the 
other, the William Shakespeare Com- 
pany, requires a structure so that can- 
cellations due to inclement weather may 
cease. 







wA4«i%»--- 



#- » 



2 



Design for 

the Environment 



The Linn Cove Viaduct curves 
elegantly around the mountain- 
side in North Carolina. The 
roadway is built on precast 
concrete piers and does not 
touch the terrain or damage 
the environment. 



"It is no longer man and the environment as separate entities. 
There is a new unity," says Ian McHarg, professor of land- 
scape architecture at the University of Pennsylvania. To de- 
sign with this unity in mind is the pivotal challenge that falls 
to the landscape architect. 

The profession has not always been viewed as having this 
kind of social responsibility. The conventional wisdom has 
been that landscape architects plan gardens, create marvelous 
grounds for the wealthy, and arrive after architects in order to 
arrange benches and potted trees. Landscape architecture has 
often been overshadowed by, and in the service of, architec- 
ture. In a broader sense, however, it is the role of the land- 
scape architect to design humane spaces — to integrate nature 
and human activity while preserving the environment. This is 
surely one of the most urgent tasks of our times — an issue not 
just of regional or national importance but of global signifi- 
cance. 

There is a strong tradition in America for landscape ar- 
chitecture to take the lead in addressing environmental issues. 
Landscape architecture goes back to Frederick Law Olmsted, 
who founded the profession in this country and became its 
greatest practitioner. Olmsted is best known as the architect 
of Central Park, but he was also the first commissioner of 
Yosemite National Park, a pioneer in both conservation and 
city planning. 

In The Granite Garden Anne Spirn sums up Olmsted's 
contribution to creating humane spaces in urban environ- 
ments: "From the close of the Civil War to the end of the 
nineteenth century, Olmsted forged a role for urban parks 
which was bound up in the alleviation of the nineteenth- 
century city's social and environmental problems. . . . 
Through the design of parks and parkways, he sought to 
improve the city's climate, to alleviate air and water pollution, 
to mitigate floods and to provide a naturalistic counterpoint to 
the city's buildings and bustling streets." 

Some critics say, though, that modern landscape architec- 
ture lost touch with its past and failed to define a clear role for 
itself in the present. One grantee, in fact, assumes that this is 
so: In 1987 the Museum of Modern Art won funding for a 
symposium "investigating why modern architecture became 
divorced from nature, how the demise of the garden and the 
park in their traditional contemplative roles came about and 



68 CHAPTER TWO 



why a significant modern landscape design has failed to flour- 
ish in this century." 

With this background in mind, it is interesting to look at the 
goals of the 200 grants awarded by the Design Arts Program 
from 1977 through 1987 in the field of environmental design. 

Many of the grants aim to document the American heritage 
in landscape design. Grants have funded biographies of influ- 
ential landscape architects: Dan Kiley, Calvert Vaux, 
Fletcher Steele, Jens Jensen and Thomas Church. Films 
record the life and work of John Brinkerhoff" Jackson and of 
town planner Earle Draper. Two major exhibits by Wave Hill 
document the work of America's great landscape designers in 
garden design, college campuses and residences. Wave Hill 
has also begun an ambitious project to compile records 
documenting the entire body of landscape work created in this 
country. 

Grants have also gone to organizations dedicated to restor- 
ing the legacy of parks designed by Olmsted: to Central Park 
Conservancy for a plan to restore Central Park; to Bufl"alo 
Friends of Olmsted Parks for a plan to restore the South Park 
Arboretum; and to the National Association for Olmsted 
Parks for a national inventory of the parks as a basis for 
further restoration. 

There are also films on the history of the American land- 
scape (National Trust for Historic Preservation) and studies 
aimed at preserving historic landscapes — for example, the 
Conservation Foundation's survey of New England seaport 
towns. 

A number of interesting ideas surfaced for creating more 
green spaces; grants were awarded to develop parks and recre- 
ational areas not only from vacant city land but also from 



abandoned quarries and canals as well as unused military 
bases. A good many communities have looked at their water- 
fronts and have won grants to link them with historic districts, 
obtain zoning to protect them as urban conservation areas or 
create waterfront walkways. 

Increasingly, grantees use technology to help predict the 
impact of proposed development. The University of Oregon, 
for example, used computer models to study the implications 
of proposed changes upon the Columbia River Gorge; and the 
Trust for Public Land developed scenic assessment method- 
ology to develop guidelines for protecting areas of intrinsic 
beauty from disruptive land development. 

Among these grants are some new and bold ventures: more 
than twenty-five grants exploring energy-conscious design; a 
project in Hackensack, New Jersey, to transform a solid-waste 
landfill into a landscaped work of art; a plan by the New York 
City Neighborhood Open Space Coalition for a forty-mile 
urban greenway providing a pedestrian and bicycle trail 
stretching from the Atlantic Ocean to Long Island Sound; 
and the Nature Conservancy's program for preserving the 
southern segment of Virginia's Eastern Shore — a seventy- 
mile strip that is one of the nation's most complete ecosys- 
tems. 

To be sure, there are accomplishments here that have en- 
riched many communities. Whether landscape architecture 
will contribute more to the conservation of the environment in 
the future probably depends less on landscape architects than 
on what society demands of them. For real change to occur, 
says Ian McHarg, "there must be a profound change in social 
values, notably attitudes to nature and a conception of what 
constitutes a humane environment." 



Lake Merritt Channel Park in 
Oakland, California, provides 
a broad strip of green on either 
side of the channel that emp- 
ties into San Francisco Bay. 
The waterfront park also fea- 
tures a sculpture garden. 




DESIGN FOR THE ENVIRONMENT 69 



Landscape Architecture 

Urban, suburban and rural landscape projects for streets, 
public gardens and parks, urban garden and forestry studies 
and educational programs. 



Architectural League of 

New York 

FY 1986 

S30.000 

86-4256-0084 

Contact: Executive Director. 

Architectural League of 

New York, 457 Madison 

Avenue, New York, NY 

10022 



Brattleboro Museum and 
Art Center 
FY 1983 
$21,700 
32-4250^178 
Contact: Director, 
Brattleboro Museum and 
Art Center, PO. Box 662, 
Brattleboro, VT 05301 



Brockway, Lucinda A. 

FY 1987 

$10,000 

87-4216-0052 

Contact: 53 High Street, 

Kennebunk, ME 04043 



Bronx Frontier Development 

Corporation 

FY 1979 

$15,000 

92-4212-037 

Contact: President, Bronx 

Frontier Development 

Corporation, 1080 Leggett, 

Bronx, NY 10474 



Campbell, Regula F. 

FY 1980 

$5,000 

01-4212-152 

Contact: 708 Angelas Place, 

Venice, CA 90291 



For a program on landscape and ar- 
chitecture that explores emerging aes- 
thetic directions in landscape design. The 
aim was to encourage professional 
collaboration among architects, land- 
scape architects and environmental art- 
ists in order to integrate built and natu- 
ral forms. 



To produce a traveling exhibit and cata- 
logue on the design of the small garden. 
The exhibit, entitled Built Landscapes: 
Four Landscape Architects Designing 
Small Spaces, was intended to create 
public awareness both of landscape ar- 
chitecture and of the work of four artists: 
A.B. Bye, Beatrix Farrand, Dan Kiley 
and James Rose. 



To analyze historical landscape design 
trends in three types of New England 
districts: seacoast urban centers, river 
towns and farm communities. The aims 
were to determine the influence of the 
English landscape school of design and 
to provide standards for evaluating sites 
for listing in the National Register of 
Historic Places. 



To produce a bilingual film documen- 
tary. The Greening of New York City, on 
the use of urban community gardening 
as a method of promoting alternative 
land uses for the reuse of abandoned ar- 
eas. 



For a monograph illustrating and analyz- 
ing periods and styles of landscape ar- 
chitecture in southern California. The 
area offers a living catalogue of land- 
scape design with its abundahce of civic, 
residential, commercial and even indus- 
trial gardens. 



City of Oakland 

FY 1980 

$20,000 

02-4250-133 

Contact: Chief Architect. 

City of Oakland, 142! 

Washington Street, 

Oakland, C A 94612 



City of St. Paul 

FY 1985 

$50,000 

52-4257-0050 

Contact: Mayor, City of St. 

Paul, Department of 

Planning and Economic 

Development. 25 West 

Fourth Street. St. Paul, MN 

55102 



Conservation Foundation 
FY 1982 
$35,000 
22-4250-131 

Contact: Executive Vice- 
President, Conservation 
Foundation, 1717 
Massachusetts Avenue, 
N.W., Washington, DC 
20036 



Conservation Foundation 
FY 1986 
$50,000 

NEA DC A 86-16 
Contact: Vice-President, 
Conservation Foundation, 
1717 Massachusetts 
Avenue, N.W., Washington, 
DC 20036 



Corcoran, Anne M. 
FY 1983 
$10,000 
31-4213-00010 
Contact: Landscape 
Architect, Kiley-Walker, 
East Farm, VT 05445 



Denver Civic Ventures, Inc. 
FY 1980 
$14,000 
02-4240-005 
Contact: Theatrical 
Diversions — Denver. 7271 
South Vine Street, Littleton, 
CO 80122 



For the Oakland Street Tree Plan. The 
plan included a unified planting design 
for a network of major streets, neighbor- 
hood planning units and provided in- 
formation about tree selection, planting 
and care. 



To sponsor a landscape architecture com- 
petition for the creation of a public plaza 
at a major intersection. The intersection. 
Block 22, is considered the gateway to 
St. Paul's central business district. 



For a script and film that examine the 
evolution of the American landscape 
through the work of landscape architect 
John Brinkerhoff Jackson. 



To produce A Figure in a Landscape, a 
documentary film on American land- 
scape architect John Brinkerhoff Jack- 
son. An amendment, NEA DCA 86-16.1, 
for $10,000 was made in 1986. 



To write a book on landscape architect 
Dan Kiley, whose works reflect rigorous 
standards and a holistic philosophy. 
Kiley was responsible for landscaping 
Dulles Airport in Virginia, the Ford 
Foundation Building in New York, the 
Oakland Museum in California and the 
third block of Independence Mall in 
Pennsylvania. A 270-page manuscript 
was produced. 



To develop the design aspects of a land- 
scape proposal that would link a conven- 
tion center with adjacent performing arts 
facilities. A $10,000 amendment, 22- 
4230-9005.1, was made in 1982. 



70 CHAPTER TWO 



Designwrights 

Collaborative, Inc. 

FY 1986 

$40,000 

86-4256-0081 

Contact: President, 

Designwrights 

Collaborative, Inc.. Route 

T. RO. Box 124 MR, Santa 

Fe, NM 87501 



Dry, Caroline M. 

FY 1980 

$7,500 

01-4210-032 

Contact: 3196 Alice Drive, 

Newbury Park, CA 91320 



Environmental Images, Inc. 
FY 1986 
$15,000 
86-4256-0020 
Contact: President, 
Environmental Images, Inc., 
1 346 Connecticut Avenue, 
N.W., Suite 325, 
Washington, DC 20036 



Foster, Ruth S. 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R7I-42-42N 

Contact: 270 Somerset 

Street, Belmont, MA 02178 



Franklin, Carol L. 

FY 1981 

$9,000 

11-4213-264 

Contact: 532 West 

Springfield Avenue, 

Philadelphia, PA 191 18 



Franklin, Victoria A. 

FY 1980 

$5,000 

01-4212-153 

Contact: Box 213, Arroyo 

Seco, NM 87514 



To produce a publication on landscape 
design in the arid Southwest. The aim 
was to document how landscape archi- 
tects can improve the quality of design in 
this region using environmentally com- 
patible and historically appropriate de- 
signs and materials drawn from the 
Pueblo Indian, Spanish, Mexican and 
pioneer heritage. 



To prepare an exhibit, video and portable 
demonstration kit for exploring the arts 
of building with sand, earth and trees. 



To catalogue the slide resources of the 
American Society of Landscape Archi- 
tects and the Landscape Architecture 
Foundation. The collection consists of 
2,500 slides from over 300 projects. 



To write a book entitled Planning and 
Management of the Urban Forest. Urban 
forestry is a discipline synthesizing the 
fields of architecture, planning, physics, 
forestry and horticulture. 



To produce a design and management 
guide for Russell Wright's Manitoga, an 
American garden following in the tradi- 
tion of Frederick Law Olmsted and Jens 
Jensen. The aim was to provide a basis 
for master planning and to enable the 
Nature Conservancy, which manages the 
garden, to restore the garden's dramatic 
character. 



To survey landscape materials being 
used successfully at altitudes from 5,000 
to 8,000 feet in northern New Mexico, 
and to produce a manuscript on appro- 
priate landscape architecture materials 
for this area. A $7,000 amendment, 
grant number 21-4213-09153, was 
awarded in 1982. 



Frederick Law Olmsted 

Association 

FY 1985 

$20,000 

52-4256-0037 

Contact: President, 

Frederick Law Olmsted 

Association, 175 Fifth 

Avenue, New York, NY 

10010 



Gallery, Leslie M. 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

91-4232-162 

Contact: 99 East Bells Mill 

Road, Philadelphia, PA 

19118 



Grese, Robert E. 

FY 1987 

$10,000 

87-4216-0045 

Contact: University of 

Michigan, 430 East 

University, Dana Building, 

Ann Arbor, Ml 48109 



Harvard University 

FY 1980 

$25,000 

02-4250-118 

Contact: Chairman, 

Harvard University, 

Department of Landscape 

Architecture, 417 Gund 

Hall, Cambridge, MA 

02138 



Hilderbrand, Gary R. 

FY 1985 

$5,000 

51-4213-0139 

Contact: 1 586 Cambridge 

Street, No. 2, Cambridge, 

MA 02138 



Hoover, Wilford G. 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

91-4232-163 

Contact: 9 Calhoun Terrace, 

San Francisco, CA 94133 



Kane, Thomas J. 
FY 1986 
$10,000 
86-4213-0052 
Contact: Kane, Liede & 
Ratyna, 70 Sarles Lane, 
Pleasantville, NY 10570 



To publish a book about the landscape 
and building architect Calvert Vaux. 
Vaux's individual works include the orig- 
inal buildings for the Metropolitan and 
Natural History Museums. He collabo- 
rated with Andrew Jackson Downing, 
Frederick Law Olmsted, Frederick 
Clarke Withers, George Radford, Jacob 
Wray Mould, Samuel Parsons, Jr. and 
many others. 



For research on the American tradition 
in landscape design as developed in 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 



To investigate the work of nineteenth- 
and twentieth-century landscape archi- 
tects who made use of natural forms and 
regional plants as a way of forming ties 
between the designed world and natural 
landscape. 



To produce two videotapes that explain 
and illustrate practical solutions to prob- 
lems encountered by design profes- 
sionals, such as how to plant a tree and 
how to construct a retaining wall. This 
practical knowledge is only sketchily 
taught at most institutions. 



To study landscape garden forms of the 
American neoclassical period ( 1 890- 
1929), including the great estate land- 
scapes. 



To produce a videotape pilot on the work 
of American landscape architect John 
Brinkerhoff Jackson. 



To research and document The Wood- 
pile, a well-preserved nineteenth-century 
landscape in Bedford, New York. The 
Woodpile is the site of adjoining homes 
and landscapes built by three brothers 
over three successive decades. 



DESIGN FOR THE ENVIRONMENT 7 1 



Karson, Robin S. 

FY 1987 

$10,000 

87-4216-0046 

Contact: 576 Main Street, 

Amherst, MA 01002 



Kirkwood, Grace H. 

FY 1980 

$7,500 

01-4210-036 

Contact: North Sandwich, 

NH 03259 



Kluesing, Cherie L. 

FY 1984 

$10,000 

41-4213-0136 

Contact: 1 1 Lawndale 

Street, Belmont, MA 02178 



KQED, Inc. 

FY 1987 

$30,000 

87-4251-0095 

Contact: Vice-President, 

KQED, Inc., 500 Eighth 

Street, San Francisco, CA 

94103 



Landscape Architecture 

Foundation 

FY 1982 

$10,000 

22-425(M)56 

Contact: Project Director, 

Landscape Architecture 

Foundation, 1717 N Street, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20036 



Landscape Architecture 
Foundation 
FY 1982 
$30,000 
22-4230-196 

Contact: Executive Vice- 
President, Landscape 
Architecture Foundation, 
1717 N Street, N.W., 
Washington, DC 20036 



To write a critical biography of land- 
scape architect Fletcher Steele. Steele 
designed more than a hundred gardens 
during his lifetime, and his work fused 
French, Italian and modernist design in- 
fluences. Although few of his gardens ex- 
ist today, Steele's office records are in- 
tact and include several thousand 
photographs, plans and drawings. 



To prepare materials for a book on the 
ornamental plants, shrubs and trees of 
the Middle East. A compilation in two 
volumes, including text and photographs, 
was produced. 



For a book on contemporary landscape 
architecture. The project includes site 
documentation, descriptions and analysis 
and presents a compendium of recent 
developments in ideology, symbolism and 
imagery in American landscape design. 



To produce a film on the work of John 
Brinkerhoff Jackson, the landscape histo- 
rian. Jackson's special talent is to exam- 
ine typical American landscapes — from 
small town squares to highway strips and 
skid rows — and turn these into a lexicon 
of American thought, habit and culture. 



To produce a pilot film on landscape ar- 
chitecture. The aim was to communicate 
to the American people the nature and 
scope of this design discipline and to pro- 
vide information regarding development 
and conservation. 



To hire a development officer who will 
establish a solid base for the Landscape 
Architecture Foundation's current pro- 
grams and services to the field and for 
future programs and projects. 



Landscape Architecture 

Foundation 

FY 1984 

$40,000 

42-4256-0049 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Landscape Architecture 

Foundation, 1733 

Connecticut Avenue, N.W., 

Washington, DC 20009 



Lee, Camille J. 

FY 1979 

$5,000 

91-4232-106 

Contact: 243 Curler 

Avenue, Evanston, IL 60202 



Lesser, Ellen McCelland 
FY 1983 
$5,000 

31-4212-00135 
Contact: PO. Box 455, 
Northampton, MA 0106! 



Litton, R. Burton, Jr. 
FY 1982 
$12,000 
21-4215-089 
Contact: Professor, 
Landscape Architecture, 
University of California, 
Berkeley, 202 Wurster Hall, 
Berkeley, CA 94720 



Messenger, Pam-Anela 

FY 1984 

$10,000 

41-4213-0139 

Contact: 1263 Lombard 

Street, San Francisco, CA 

94109 



Morrish. William R. 
FY 1987 
$9,870 

87^216-0139 
Contact: Citywcsl, 248 
Spalding Drive, Beverly 
Hills, CA 90212 



To produce a documentary film on the 
Brazilian landscape architect, Roberto 
Burle Marx. 



To prepare a manuscript on the works 
and drawings of master landscape archi- 
tect Jens Jensen and to publish articles 
on Jensen's unique use of plants. A 
$4,000 amendment, grant number 21- 
4213-9016, was awarded in 1982. 



To conduct a study of plant materials 
used in formal gardens from the 1 890s 
through the 1920s. The purpose was to 
develop an accurate identification system 
for plants used in that period, in particu- 
lar the flowering plants of the northeast. 



To study several English landscape eval- 
uation projects. The aim was to identify 
dependable criteria for landscape assess- 
ment and design, linking landscape val- 
ues perceived by the public and those of 
professionals. 



To prepare a biography and historical 
overview of the life and work of Thomas 
Dolliver Church, landscape architect. In 
the course of his fifty-year career. 
Church designed nearly 4,000 projects 
and was influential in many allied design 
fields. 



To produce a publication examining 
building complexes designed to reflect 
geomorphological forms and patterns 
found in the landscape and in cultural 
mythology. The canyons of the city, the 
skyscrapers of Manhattan, the .sacred 
ziggurats of Babylon all arc expressions 
of man's fa.scination with mountainous 
terrain as inspiration for powerful urban 
landscapes. 



72 CHAPTER TWO 



Muren. Zara Pinfold 

FY 1987 

$10,000 

87-4216-0141 

Coniaci: 200 Crescent 

Road, San Anselmo, CA 

94960 



Museum of Modern Art 

FY 1987 

$20,000 

87-4251-0091 

Contact: Director, Museum 

of Modern An, 1 1 West 

53rd Street, New York, NY 

10019 



National Association for 

Olmsted Parks 

FY 1982 

$5,000 

22-1250060 

Contact: Executive Director, 

National Association for 

Olmsted Parks, 175 Fifth 

Avenue, New York, NY 

10010 



National Trust for Historic 

Preservation 

FY 1986 

$15,000 

86-4256-0032 

Contact: President, National 

Trust for Historic 

Preservation, 1785 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20036 



Nevins, Deborah F. 

FY 1984 

$10,000 

41-4213-0142 

Contact: 225 West 106th 

Street, New York, NY 

10025 



New York Foundation for 

the Arts 

FY 1985 

$25,000 

52-4256-0116 

Contact: Director, Artists 

Sponsorship Programs, New 

York Foundation for the 

Arts, 5 Beekman Street, 

New York, NY 10038 



To produce a documentary on the work 
of Roberto Burle Marx. In his native 
Brazil, Marx's striking design imagery 
and use of indigenous plants has revolu- 
tionized the treatment of urban open 
space. 



To support a symposium investigating 
why modern architecture became di- 
vorced from nature, how the demise of 
the garden and the park in their tradi- 
tional contemplative roles came about 
and why a significant modern landscape 
design has failed to flourish in this cen- 
tury. 



To create a national inventory of the 
parks planned by Frederick Law Olm- 
sted to provide a basis for restoration 
programs. The aim was to create an un- 
derstanding of the character and influ- 
ence of parks and well-planned open 
spaces in the urban environment. 



For a series of films on the history of the 
American landscape, both natural and 
man-made, from the earliest native 
Americans settlements to the present. 



For a book on the garden and landscape 
movement in England and America be- 
tween 1860 and 1914. The movement di- 
verged from rigid principles practiced in 
Victorian landscape design and from it a 
new theory of natural landscaping 
evolved. 



To produce a film about the American 
landscape designer Frederick Law Olm- 
sted. 



President and Fellows of 

Harvard College 

FY 1984 

$8,814 

42-4252-0101 

Contact: Associate Dean, 

Office of Sponsored 

Research, Harvard 

University, Holyoke Center, 

Fourth Roor, Cambridge, 

MA 02138 



President and Fellows of 

Harvard College 

FY 1986 

$28,700 

86-4252-0128 

Contact: Associate Dean for 

Administration, Harvard 

College, Graduate School of 

Design, Cambridge, MA 

02138 



Riley, Robert 
FY 1984 
$10,000 
41-4213-0146 
Contact: Department of 
Landscape Architecture, 
214 Mumford Hall, 1301 
West Gregory Drive, 
Urbana, IL 61801 



Roxbury Community School 

FY 1982 

$26,310 

22^230-209 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Roxbury Community 

School, I A Leyland Street, 

Dorchester, MA 02125 



To create designs of imaginary ideal sites 
in America, including drawings, models 
and plans. A catalogue entitled Trans- 
forming the American Garden: Twelve 
New Landscape Designs was published. 



San Francisco Friends of 

the Urban Forest 

FY 1982 

$17,500 

22^23(M)31 

Contact: Executive Director, 

San Francisco Friends of 

the Urban Forest, 1095 

Market Street, Suite 604, 

San Francisco, CA 94103 



Scheffey, Andrew J. W. 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R71-42-24N 

Contact: Broad Hill Road, 

Leverctt, MA 01054 



To consider ice as a new medium for 
landscape architecture. While winter 
usually turns outdoor fountains into bar- 
ren areas, the use of ice as an aesthetic 
element may add light and beauty if 
properly planned for. 



To produce a seminar entitled "The 
Meaning of Garden." The seminar fo- 
cused on the psychological meaning of 
landscapes and their elements. It devel- 
oped a conceptual understanding of "gar- 
den" for the use of designers and related 
the concept to current theoretical struc- 
tures in environmental psychology. 



For landscape design of a site adjacent to 
the Roxbury School. A prototypical ur- 
ban landscape and garden were designed 
that can be replicated throughout 
Roxbury. A large proportion of the land 
in this neglected neighborhood is vacant, 
and land management is crucial to the 
success of the community's redevelop- 
ment and revitalization plans. 



To conduct a streetscape design compe- 
tition for San Francisco neighborhoods. 
The aim was to encourage residents to 
develop a visual theme for their immedi- 
ate environs through a group design pro- 
cess. The competition winners received 
prizes of 25, 75 and 150 trees, as well as 
technical assistance to implement their 
plans. 



To study the emerging concepts of land- 
scape design policy in selected European 
and Asian countries and in the United 
States. 



DESIGN FOR THE ENVIRONMENT 73 



Skolnik, Arthur M. 
FY 1978 
$10,000 
R81-42-26N 
Contact: c/o The 
Conservation Company, 
1955 Sixth Avenue West, 
Seattle, WA 981 19 



Sowell, Richard L., Jr. 

FY 1979 

$5,000 

92-4233-074 

Contact: 77 U Street, N.W., 

Washington, DC 20001 



Spirn, Anne W. 

FY 1981 

$5,000 

11-4213-110 

Contact: 1 578 Cambridge 

Street, Cambridge, MA 

02138 



Staten Island Botanical 

Garden 

FY 1985 

$14,000 

52-4231-0128 

Contact: President, Staten 

Island Botanical Garden, 

914 Richmond Terrace, 

Staten Island, NY 10301 



Sleinitz, Carl F. 

FY 1982 

$5,000 

21-4213-187 

Contact: Professor, 

Landscape Architecture and 

Planning, Harvard 

University, 417 Gund Hall, 

Cambridge, MA 02138 



Streatfield, David C. 

FY 1985 

$10,000 

51-4213-0155 

Contact: Department of 

Landscape Architecture, 

348 Gould Hall, University 

of Washington, Seattle, WA 

98105 



To prepare a guide to urban conservation 
based on the redevelopment of Seattle's 
Pioneer Square historic district. A 1 38- 
page report, A Conservator's Comments 
and Opinions in the Field of Urban Con- 
servation, was issued. 



To produce landscape architecture de- 
sign plans for a neighborhood street im- 
provement program in Washington, D.C. 
The aim was to foster a sense of pride, 
community and security in the neighbor- 
hood. 



For a book entitled The Granite Garden: 
Urban Nature and Human Design. The 
book, published in 1984, is a landscape 
architectural overview of the urban natu- 
ral environment. 



To design a Chinese country garden at 
the botanical garden in Snug Harbor. 
The Chinese motif commemorates Snug 
Harbor as a home for retired seamen 
who worked in trade with China in the 
nineteenth century. Landscape architects 
from the People's Republic of China car- 
ried out the design work. 



To experiment with satellite photo- 
graphic computer analysis as a method 
of analyzing the visual impacts of urban 
development and agricultural and for- 
estry practices. The study focused on the 
Monadnock region of southern New 
Hampshire and provided a comparative 
demonstration of state-of-the-art visual 
analysis methods in landscape architec- 
ture. 



To perform research for a book on the 
relationship between theory and practice 
in landscape architecture in California 
between 1929 and 1960. The research 
explores the major theoretical stances 
and their European sources. 



Stokes, Samuel N. 

FY 1985 

$5,000 

51-4213-0154 

Contact: 710 Ninth Street, 

S.E., Washington, DC 

20003 



Todisco, Patrice, A. 

FY 1984 

$5,000 

41-4213-0126 

Contact: 122 West Emerson 

Street, No. 3, Melrose, MA 

02176 



University of California, 

Davis 

FY 1987 

$20,000 

87-4251-0086 

Contact: Associate Dean, 

Research and Development, 

University of California, 

Davis, Office of Research, 

275 Mark Hall, Davis, CA 

95616 



University of Georgia 
FY 1986 
$5,000 

86-4256-0086 
Contact: Director, 
University of Georgia, 
Community and Area 
Development, 300 Old 
College, Athens, GA 30602 



University of Georgia 
Research Foundation, Inc. 
FY 1986 
$40,000 
86-4256-0094 
Contact: Executive Vice- 
President, University of 
Georgia Research 
Foundation, Inc., Athens, 
GA 30602 



University of Minnesota of 
Minneapolis/St. Paul 
FY 1986 
$15,000 
86-4252-0053 

Contact: Assistant Director, 
University of Minnesota of 
Minneapolis/Sl. Paul. 
Office of Research 
Administration, 1919 
University Avenue, St. Paul. 
MN 55104 



To plan a film series on the history of the 
American landscape. The aim was to ex- 
plore land use practices — demonstrating 
how natural land forms, soils and climate 
shaped settlement patterns and, in turn, 
how inhabitants shaped the environment. 
Work continued under grant number 86- 
4256-0032. 



To perform research for a book on Amer- 
ican women writers (between 1830 and 
1930) and the gardens they designed. 
The goal was to examine the relation be- 
tween literature and the designed envi- 
ronment through the expression of these 
women's ideas in their writings and in 
the physical forms of their gardens. 



For a book that examines the psychologi- 
cal and cultural meanings of gardens in 
daily life, based on papers presented at a 
conference of garden designers, social 
scientists and representatives of national 
garden associations and popular garden 
magazines. 



To produce a documentary video entitled 
In Search of Excellence in Community 
Design. The video focuses on Earle S. 
Draper, a landscape architect who was a 
pioneer in town and regional planning. It 
includes excerpts from an interview and 
footage from the communities in which 
he worked. 



To publish a special issue of Landscape 
Journal on landscape design theory. The 
goals were to advance the field of land- 
scape design theory, attract leading theo- 
rists in art history and philosophy and 
stimulate debate about landscape theory. 



To develop a system for classifying land- 
scapes. The aim was to create a tool to 
assist the landscape architecture profes- 
sion in the categorization of landscapes 
from various cultures and historical eras. 



74 CHAPTER TWO 



University of Wisconsin, 

Milwaukee 

FY 1987 

$20,000 

87-4251-0032 

ConlacI: Associate Dean of 

Research, University of 

Wisconsin, Milwaukee, P.O. 

Box 413. Milwaukee, Wl 

53201 



Walker, Peter 

FY 1978 

$5,000 

R8I-42-37N 

Contact: 369 Harvard 

Street, Cambridge, MA 

02138 



Wave Hill, Inc. 

FY 1983 

$20,000 

32-4250-00047 

Contact: Curator, Wave 

Hill, Inc., 675 West 252nd 

Street, Bronx, NY 10471 



Wave Hill, Inc. 

FY 1984 

$25,000 

42-4256-0061 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Wave Hill, Inc., 675 West 

52nd Street, Bronx, NY 

10471 



Wave Hill, Inc. 

FY 1985 

$25,000 

52-4256-0013 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Wave Hill, Inc., 675 West 

252nd Street, Bronx, NY 

10471 



Wave Hill, Inc. 

FY 1986 

$40,000 

86-4256-0096 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Wave Hill, Inc., 675 West 

252nd Street, Bronx, NY 

10471 



For a work interpreting the similarities in 
the formal and picturesque spatial plans 
of European pleasure gardens from the 
1 600s to the 1 800s and the spatial pat- 
terns used in military strategy until the 
Napoleonic Wars. 



To produce a critical evaluation of mod- 
ern landscape architecture from 1929 to 
the present. 



To produce an exhibit and catalogue, 
Portrait of an Era in Landscape Ar- 
chitecture. The exhibit consisted of pho- 
tographs of American landscape ar- 
chitecture designs by the photographer 
Mattie Edwards Hewitt. From 1900 to 
1940, Hewitt documented the works of 
virtually every significant landscape ar- 
chitect, with particular emphasis on gar- 
den design. 



To produce an exhibit entitled Gardens 
and Landscapes on Paper. The exhibit 
consisted of a wide variety of drawings 
from first sketches to presentation and 
construction drawings. The aim was to 
acquaint the public with the landscape 
architecture design process as well as the 
works of outstanding designers. 



To support an exhibition, Beatrix 
Farrand: The Campus and the Garden. 
Beatrix Farrand (1872-1959) was one of 
the great American landscape designers 
and a pioneer in the profession. This ex- 
hibition illustrated two major aspects of 
landscape architecture: public design on 
college campuses and residential design. 



To compile a catalogue of records 
documenting the entire body of land- 
scape work created in this country. The 
aims were to identify and index records 
and protect them from deterioration. 



Wave Hill, Inc. 

FY 1987 

$20,000 

87-4251-0101 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Wave Hill, Inc., 675 West 

252nd Street, Bronx, NY 

10471 



Van Valkenburgh, Michael 

R. 

FY 1985 

$10,000 

51-4213-0002 

Contact: 23 Myrtle Avenue, 

Cambridge, MA 02138 



Venturi, Robert 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R71-42-49N 

Contact: 333 South 16th 

Street, Philadelphia, PA 

19102 



Young, David L. 

FY 1979 

$4,770 

91-4232-169 

Contact: 225 West 

Fairmount Avenue, State 

College, PA 16801 



Zube, Ervin H. 

FY 1983 

$15,000 

31-4215-00175 

Contact: 7045 North 

Camino de Fosforo, Tucson, 

AZ 85718 



To continue work on a catalogue of land- 
scape records in the United States, a 
comprehensive reference to the entire 
body of landscape documentation cre- 
ated in this country. 



To perform research for an article called 
"The Flower Gardens of Gertrude Je- 
kyll." The article was published in De- 
sign Quarterly 137. 



To organize materials and prepare an 
outline for a book on the signs and sym- 
bols of the American landscape. The aim 
was to produce a permanent record of 
the grantee's ten years of research and of 
an exhibition sponsored by the Renwick 
Gallery in Washington, D.C. 



To document landscape design solutions 
in mobile home parks and developments 
throughout the Midwest, South and 
Southwest. 



For a study documenting and analyzing 
the changes over time in the concepts of 
nature, culture and aesthetics, funda- 
mental underpinnings of landscape ar- 
chitecture. The aim was to integrate this 
conceptual framework as an aid in teach- 
ing and understanding contemporary de- 
sign problems and landscape architec- 
tural history. 



DESIGN FOR THE ENVIRONMENT 75 



Land Use and Energy Conservation 

Projects and studies that address the aesthetic and efficient 
use of natural and scenic resources. Includes landscape 
management, land use planning, solar-energy designs and 
climatic and energy consumption studies. 



American Institute of 

Architects (AIA) Research 

Corporation 

FY 1978 

$60,000 

R80-42-I75N 

Contact: Director of Solar 

Energy Programs, AIA 

Research Corporation, 1 735 

New York Avenue, N.W., 

Washington, DC 20006 



American Institute of 

Architects Research 

Corporation 

FY 1979 

$7,500 

92-4212-253 

Contact: Research 

Associate, AIA Research 

Corporation, 1735 New 

York Avenue, N.W., 

Washington, DC 20006 



Association of Collegiate 

Schools of Architecture 

FY 1981 

$15,000 

12-4230-167 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Association of Collegiate 

Schools of Architecture, 

1735 New York Avenue, 

N.W. Washington, DC 

20006 



Attoe, Wayne 

FY 1978 

$5,000 

R8I-42-7N 

Contact: 1\Q\ Norfolk 

Road, Berkeley, CA 04705 



Belknap, Raymond K. 

FY 1981 

$8,500 

11-4213-083 

Contact: 819 East Hillside 

Drive, Seattle, WA 981 12 



For a series of workshops and an illus- 
trated handbook on decentralized solar 
energy use in urban, suburban and rural 
settings. The workshops were based on 
research conducted by the University of 
Massachusetts, Amherst; the Institute 
for Local Self-Reliance and the Institute 
of Public Service Performance. 



To produce the Community Energy De- 
sign Primer, a report aimed to introduce 
groups to the solar energy and energy 
conservation design concepts that can be 
implemented with the participation of an 
entire community. 



To organize a three-day design charette 
in conjunction with the 1981 annual 
meeting of the International Solar En- 
ergy Society in Philadelphia. 



To research, write and illustrate two 
studies assessing the implications of en- 
ergy-conscious design for architectural 
aesthetics. 



To prepare a simple guide for designers 
on how to find, read and evaluate envi- 
ronmental regulations that affect physi- 
cal land use planning. An explanatory 
handbook was produced. 



Biegel, Steven L. 

FY 1979 

$5,000 

91-4231-086 

Comofr 2109 South 

Shirlington Road, Arlington, 

VA 22204 



Blue Grass Land and 

Nature Trust 

FY 1978 

$1,000 

R80-42-35 

Contact: Blue Grass Land 

and Nature Trust, 7 1 2 West 

Short Street, Lexington, KY 

40508 



Boston Redevelopment 

Authority 

FY 1984 

$40,000 

42-4252-0098 

Contact: Director, Boston 

Redevelopment Authority, 

One City Hall Square, 

Boston, MA 02201 



Calthorpe, Peter A. 

FY 1983 

$10,000 

3 M2 13-00008 

Contact: Partner, Van der 

Ryn, Calthorpe and 

Partners, 55C Gate Five 

Road, Sausalito, CA 94965 



City of Austin 

FY 1985 

$29,737 

52-4257-0082 

Contact: Director, Resource 

Management, City of 

Austin, 92 Red River, 

Austin, TX 78701 



City of Dayton 

FY 1981 

$20,000 

12-4230055 

Contact: Administrative 

Assistant to the City 

Manager, City of Dayton, 

City Manager's Office, Box 

22. Dayton, OH 45401 



To prepare an educational pamphlet, 
"Concerning the National Environmental 
Policy Act of 1969." The aim was to as- 
sist federal agencies in recognizing and 
understanding the value of a properly 
balanced interdisciplinary approach to 
environmental assessment as required by 
the 1969 law. 



To encourage the most efficient use of 
landscape in Fayette County, Kentucky, 
for tourism and community uses. Field 
surveys of significant physical and visual 
features and recommendations for pres- 
ervation were made as part of the 
project. 



To develop and test urban design and 
development controls to improve the mi- 
croclimate — wind and air circulation and 
access to sunlight and daylight — in and 
around buildings. Rapid urban develop- 
ment has produced topographical 
changes in cities, resulting in undesirable 
conditions. An interdisciplinary team was 
assembled to develop new design criteria, 
policy alternatives and model standards. 



To perform research on the interrelation- 
ships of building and town form, energy 
consumption and environmental concerns 
in community and town planning. A book 
entitled Sustainable Communities: A 
New Design Synthesis for Cities, Sub- 
urbs and Towns, by Sim Van der Ryn 
and Peter Calthorpe was published in 
1986. 



For an urban design competition for resi- 
dential and commercial development in 
the Southwest. The main objective was 
to focus attention on the constraints the 
hot, dry climate imposes on design and 
to demonstrate that climate-sensitive, 
economically feasible design in this area 
is attainable. 



For the Dayton Climate Project, a land- 
scape design effort to improve Dayton's, 
energy consumption, air quality and 
noise levels. A report. Planning for Cli- 
mate, documents appropriate design 
methodologies. 



76 CHAPTER TWO 



City of Lowell 

FY 1978 

$25,000 

R80^2-I03 

Contact: Assistant Planner. 

City of Lowell. City Hall. 

Lowell. MA 01852 



Cornell University 

FY 1986 

$20,000 

8M252-O056 

Contact: Associate Director 

of Sponsored Research, 

Cornell University. Avery 

Hall. Ithaca, NY 14853 



Design Communication 

Collaborative 

FY 1981 

$13,291 

CA 81-58 

Contact: President. Design 

Communication 

Collaborative, 1346 

Connecticut Avenue, N.W., 

Suite 1005, Washington, 

DC 20036 



Eckbo, Garrett 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

91-4232-100 

Contact: 1006 Craymont 

Avenue, Berkeley, CA 

94708 



Euston. Andrew F. 

FY 1980 

$9,000 

01-4213-164 

Contact: U.S. Department 

of Housing and Urban 

Development, Room 7268, 

Washington, DC 20410 



Evans, Benjamin H. 

FY 1980 

$6,730 

01-4213-165 

Contact: Virginia 

Polytechnic Institute and 

State University, College of 

Architecture and Urban 

Studies, Blacksburg, VA 

24061 



Frankina, Jan 

FY 1981 

$8,570 

CA 81-31 

Contact: 2401 Calvert 

Street. N.W., Apt. 530, 

Washington, DC 20008 



For design work on existing hydropower 
systems in Lowell, Massachusetts. The 
work formed part of a larger effort to 
preserve the city's unique historic energy 
resources while adapting them for con- 
temporary needs. 



To support the development of a primer 
and computer models on fundamental 
design concepts. 



To develop audiovisual and printed ma- 
terials to raise public awareness about 
methods and techniques of better con- 
serving energy in buildings. 



To develop a theory that presents plan- 
ning and design as continuous processes 
moderating between land and nature and 
changes arising from society and technol- 
ogy. A book-length manuscript was pre- 
pared. 



To produce a newsletter on urban envi- 
ronmental design issues. The aim was to 
provide a forum for federal agencies, 
nonprofits, universities and private prac- 
titioners involved in the field. 



To support further investigation into the 
impact of daylight on architectural form 
and human performance, particularly 
with respect to energy-conscious design. 



To prepare a work on concepts, methods 
and values in environmental design re- 
search. 



Fraker, Harrison S., Jr. 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R71-42-52N 

Contact: 245 Nassau Street, 

Princeton. NJ 08540 



Frog Hollow Craft 

Association 

FY 1978 

$1,000 

R80-42-71 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Frog Hollow Craft 

Association, Middlebury, 

VT 05753 



Grebner, Dennis W. 

FY 1983 

$10,000 

3M213-O0156 

Contact: 1741 Glenview 

Avenue. St. Paul. MN 

55112 



Greenbie, Barrie B. 

FY 1978 

$5,000 

R8M2-12N 

Contact: 1 5 Cortland Drive, 

Amherst, MA 01002 



Grese, Robert E. 
FY 1983 
$5,000 

31-4213-00147 
Contact: 1306 Vilas, 
Madison, WI 55715 



Harkness, Sarah P 

FY 1978 

$5,000 

R81-42-4N 

Contact: Architects 

Collaborative, 46 Brattle 

Street, Cambridge, MA 

02138 



Institute for Local Self- 

Reliance 

FY 1978 

$30,000 

R80-42-177N 

Contact: Codirector, 

Institute for Local Self- 

Reliance, 1717 18th Street, 

N.W.. Washington, DC 

20009 



To apply passive solar energy concepts 
and energy conservation principles to the 
design of commercial office buildings 
and high-rise apartments in four climate 
zones. 



For engineering studies to evaluate 
hydropower as a source of energy for the 
Frog Hollow Craft Association. 



For a film documentary. Landscape of 
the Visual Environment. The subject of 
the film is Gordon Cullen, an interna- 
tionally known planner, architect, author 
and educator. 



To research and write a book examining 
the design and planning of public and 
private spaces, and the ways in which 
each satisfies human needs. The book, 
entitled Spaces: Dimensions of the Hu- 
man Landscape, was published in 1981 
by Yale University Press. 



To analyze the work of landscape de- 
signer Jens Jensen in connection with a 
project to develop written guidelines on 
effective landscape management. A 
book, A Process for the Interpretation 
and Management of a Designed Land- 
scape, was published. 



To prepare an illustrated booklet, Build- 
ing with the Sun. The work presents se- 
lected solar designs and design analyses 
and simplified technical explanations. 



To conduct research on decentralized so- 
lar energy use in an urban community 
and to assess its impact on the visual 
quality of the environment. 



DESIGN FOR THE ENVIRONMENT 77 



Institute for the 

Development of Evolutive 

Architecture 

FY 1981 

$20,000 

12-4252-211 

Contact: President, Institute 

for the Development of 

Evolutive Architecture, 329 

Westcott Street, Syracuse, 

NY 13210 



Institute of Public Service 

Performance, Inc. 

FY 1978 

$30,000 

R80-42-176N 

Contact: Institute of Public 

Service Performance, 16 

Park Avenue, Suite 2D, 

New York, NY 10016 



Kapstein, Ethan B. 
FY 1980 
$10,000 
01-4213-168 
Contact: 62] North 
Carolina Avenue, S.E., 
Washington, DC 20003 



Kayden, Jerold S. 

FY 1980 

$10,000 

0M213-169 

Contact: 5 Howard Street, 

Brattleboro,VT 05301 



Kermit, Lee J., Jr. 

FY 1981 

$8,500 

11-4213-094 

Contact: 104 Berkeley 

Drive, Syracuse, NY 13210 



Klein, James R. 

FY 1982 

$9,100 

21-4213-096 

Contact: Writer/Editor, Mt. 

Hood National Forest, 2816 

N.E. 54lh Street, Portland, 

OR 97213 



To formulate design guidelines for an ap- 
propriate cooling system for Frank Lloyd 
Wright's Robie House in Chicago. Re- 
search focused on Wright's natural venti- 
lation system and its relationship to the 
shape and form of the house and evalu- 
ated solar concepts from the era. An il- 
lustrated brochure was produced. 



For research on decentralized solar en- 
ergy use in a suburban community and 
its impact on the visual quality of the 
environment. 



To develop materials for a traveling ex- 
hibit on the use of solar energy from an- 
cient Greece to the present. 



To assemble materials for an audiovisual 
presentation and a book documenting 
five major areas in the land use field. 
The aim was to enhance technical read- 
ing materials with visual documentation 
and to demonstrate the significance of 
land use issues. 



For a design manual on the aesthetic 
possibilities of alternative energy facili- 
ties such as hydroelectric, solid- and liq- 
uid-waste steam plants. An illustrated re- 
port resulted. 



To study the design consequences of Or- 
egon's innovative state land-use laws on 
small communities at the edges of ex- 
panding metropolitan areas. The study 
proposed means of conserving traditional 
rural values and open space resources. 
Slides and two reports documented the 
project. 



Labs, Kenneth B 

FY 1981 

$10,000 

1M2 13-092 

Contact: 147 Livingston 

Street, New Haven, CT 

06511 



Lalvani, Haresh 

FY 1979 

$8,000 

91-4232-105 

Contact: 317 Washington 

Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 

11205 



Lewis, Philip H. 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R81-42-24N 

Contact: 2809 Columbia 

Road, Madison, WI 53706 



Lord, David 

FY 1984 

$10,000 

4M213-0137 

Contact: University of 

Hawaii, School of 

Architecture, Honolulu, HI 

96822 



Marder, Lisa O. 

FY 1986 

$5,000 

86-4213-0112 

Contact: 22 Wapping Road, 

Kingston, MA 02364 



To complete a systematic study of archi- 
tectural climatology and its application 
to building design. A book entitled Cli- 
matic Design: Energy-Efficient Building 
Principles and Practices was published 
in 1983 (coauthored by the grantee and 
Donald Watson). 



For research into the relationship be- 
tween architectural form and form in na- 
ture. The research included development 
of a notation system to facilitate teaching 
the fundamentals of form and structure. 



To research and write a publication illus- 
trating in lay terms the theory behind the 
identification, organization and integra- 
tion of resource considerations as a basis 
for guiding growth. A manuscript enti- 
tled / 980 Growth Strategies was pro- 
duced. 



For research showing that environmental 
control systems — lighting, heating, venti- 
lation and acoustics — are elements of 
architectural meaning that can have a 
major impact on buildings. A report enti- 
tled Power Applied to Purpose resulted. 



To study the relationship between the 
aesthetics of nature and our perception 
of urban public places, and to explore 
the design implications of this relation- 
ship. The results were disseminated 
through a gallery exhibit, a report and a 
slide presentation of selected oil paint- 
ings. 




Preserving a landscape of forests, hills and JiflJs and maintmning 
a community of working farms are the goals of the Boxley Valley 
Land Use Plan, which won a Presidential Design Award. 



78 CHAPTER TWO 



Massachusetts Audubon 

Society 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R7a42-160 

Contact: Director. 

Massachusetts Audubon 

Society, Environmental 

Intern Program, Lincoln, 

MA 01773 



Massachusetts Department 

of Public Works 

FY 1986 

$77,000 

86^257-0177 

Contact: Commissioner, 

Massachusetts Department 

of Public Works, 10 Park 

Plaza, Boston, MA 021 16 



Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology 

FY 1981 

$15,000 

12-4250-201 

Contact: Principal 

Investigator, Massachusetts 

Institute of Technology, 77 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

Cambridge. MA 02139 



Meyer, William 

FY 1980 

$6,000 

01-4213-068 

Contact: 353 East 72nd 

Street. No. 3 1 B. New York, 

NY 10021 



Middlesex County 

FY 1978 

$14,910 

R80-42-47 

Contact: County Recycling 

Coordinator, County of 

Middlesex. 1 34 New Street. 

New Brunswick, NJ 08901 



MIT Press 
FY 1981 
$20,000 
12-4250-199 
Contact: Acquisitions 
Editor. MIT Press. 77 
Massachusetts Avenue, 
Cambridge, MA 02139 



To continue the Environmental Intern- 
ship Program in New England and New 
York. Through the program, student in- 
terns provided short-term technical assis- 
tance to community organizations and 
government agencies and participated in 
interdisciplinary workshops and semi- 
nars. 



For a national design competition for a 
bridge in a highly visible area in Massa- 
chusetts. The aim of the competition was 
to advance the art of bridge design, pro- 
mote the concept of competitive engi- 
neering design and expand public aware- 
ness about design. 



To demonstrate energy transfer phenom- 
ena associated with the form and shape 
of buildings using scale models. A video- 
tape entitled The Utilization of Physical 
Scale Models for Energy Conscious De- 
sign Education was produced. The aim 
was to show the effectiveness of scale 
models in teaching certain concepts. 



To write a book describing quantitative 
design decision aids for passive solar and 
energy conservation applications for ar- 
chitecture. 



To investigate the feasibility of a recy- 
cling plant for the recovery of resources 
from residential waste. Both high tech- 
nology/capital intensive and low technol- 
ogy/low capital intensive solutions were 
proposed. A report documented the pre- 
liminary design solutions. 



For publication of the book Sun Rhythm 
Form by Ralph L. Knowles. The book 
was published in 1981 and is primarily 
concerned with solar access, particularly 
in urban areas. 



Mullin. John R. 

FY 1982 

$7,200 

21-4213-181 

Contact: Director. Graduate 

School of Regional 

Planning, University of 

Massachusetts, 206 North 

Valley Road, Pelham, MA 

01002 



Nature Conservancy, Inc. 
FY 1986 
$45,300 
86-4231-0016 
Contact: President, The 
Nature Conservancy, Inc., 
1800 North Kent Street, 
Suite 800, Arlington, VA 
22209 



Neighborhood Housing 
Services of Savannah, Inc. 
FY 1980 
$15,000 
02-4254-051 
Contact: President, 
Neighborhood Housing 
Service of Savannah. Inc., 
2204 Price Street, 
Savannah, GA 31401 



New Jersey Institute of 

Technology 

FY 1982 

$18,000 

22-4252-078 

Contact: Associate 

Professor, New Jersey 

Institute of Technology, 

School of Architecture, 323 

High Street, Newark, NJ 

07102 



New York Landmarks 

Conservancy 

FY 1981 

$14,145 

12-4230-071 

Contact: Associate Director, 

New York Landmarks 

Conservancy, 1 1 Broadway, 

New York, NY 10004 



North Carolina Agricultural 

and Technical State 

University 

FY 1978 

$15,000 

R80-42-28 

Contact: North Carolina 

Agricultural and Technical 

State University, 

Greensboro, NC 2741 1 



To analyze Henry Ford's concept of in- 
dustries by studying the fifteen small 
plant and community support facilities 
he built. These towns actualized Ford's 
ideas for the decentralization of industry 
into small towns and for the incorpora- 
tion of the manufacturing plants into the 
ecological balance of the areas. 



To integrate design concerns into the re- 
search, planning and environmental con- 
servation of the southernmost segment of 
Virginia's Eastern Shore. This seventy- 
mile strip is one of the most complete 
ecosystems in the United States, but 
development threatens the integrity of its 
natural environment. 



To design and implement a landscape 
master plan for a racially and economi- 
cally diverse neighborhood in Savannah, 
Georgia. 



To integrate the relationship of light, fen- 
estration and energy in the design of 
multifamily housing using precast con- 
crete construction systems. A report. The 
Synthesis of Passive Solar and Modular 
Concepts, was produced. 



To prepare a set of energy retrofitting 
plans and specifications for the reuse of 
PS. 157 as housing. A report entitled 
Window Rehabilitation: A Manual for 
Historic Buildings was produced. 



For a one-year environmental design pro- 
gram for design students, practicing pro- 
fessionals and the general public. The 
project's goals were to enhance the skills 
of environmental design professionals 
and students, generate design concepts 
for the region and increase public aware- 
ness. 



DESIGN FOR THE ENVIRONMENT 79 



Novitski, Barbara-Jo 

FY 1982 

$10,000 

21-4213-100 

Contact: Research 

Associate, University of 

Oregon, Department of 

Architecture, Eugene, OR 

97403 



Oakland Museum 

Association 

FY 1980 

$7,250 

02-4250-134 

Contact: Senior Curator, 

Oakland Museum 

Association, 1000 Oak 

Street, Oakland, CA 94607 



Pennsylvania State 

University 

FY 1978 

$11,520 

R80-42-151 

Contact: Associate Professor 

of Landscape Architecture, 

Pennsylvania State 

University, Main Campus, 5 

Old Main, University Park, 

PA 16802 



Philadelphia Art Alliance 

FY 1980 

$30,000 

02-4252-149 

Contact: Project Director, 

Philadelphia Art Alliance, 

234 South Third Street, 

Philadelphia, PA 19106 



Planning Approaches for 

Community Environments 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R7(M2-40 

Contact: President, Planning 

Approaches for Community 

Environments, 872 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

Cambridge, MA 02139 



Reiniger, Clair W. 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

91-4232-165 

Contact: Route 1 , Box 

108D, Santa Fe, NM 87501 



To develop a methodology for analyzing 
climate and to generate energy-conscious 
architectural design criteria. The criteria 
were incorporated into a set of interac- 
tive computer programs that were used 
to develop, test and evaluate designs. 



For an exhibition entitled Solar Age Ar- 
chitecture: Six California Buildings. The 
buildings demonstrate how excellent 
architectural design and passive and ac- 
tive solar principles can be successfully 
integrated. 



To develop design guidelines for incorpo- 
rating metal extraction and recycling 
plants into Pennsylvania communities. 



To explore possible uses of passive solar 
design principles in developing a twelve- 
mile roadway in Philadelphia: to use a 
subway tunnel as a source for heating 
and cooling buildings on the street, to di- 
vert energy resources from new construc- 
tion into older buildings and to use pas- 
sive solar principles in the siting and 
design of public open spaces. 



To develop a kit of instructional materi- 
als to assist environmental design activi- 
ties in small communities. 



To support the production of a slide 
presentation which will analyze the vi- 
sual impact of existing and proposed 
development along the foothills and 
ridges viewed from the city of Sante Fe, 
New Mexico. 



Research Foundation of the 

State University of New 

York 

FY 1984 

$20,000 

42-4256-0055 

Contact: Associate 

Professor, Research 

Foundation of the State 

University of New York, 

RO. Box 9, Albany, NY 

12201 



Reynolds, Michael E. 

FY 1981 

$8,500 

11-4213-103 

Contact: Box 1 04 1 , Taos, 

NM 87571 



Savannah Landmark 

Rehabilitation Project 

FY 1977 

$18,000 

R70-42-162 

Contact: Historic 

Preservation Planner, 

Savannah Landmark 

Rehabilitation Project, PO. 

Box 8801, Savannah, GA 

31402 



Savannah Landmarks 

Rehabilitation Project 

FY 1978 

$5,087 

R80-42-128CN 

Contact: Director, Savannah 

Landmarks Rehabilitation 

Project, PO. Box 8801, 

Savannah, G A 31402 



To produce a book and videocassette on 
architecture in cold climates. The aims 
were to demonstrate the mediating role 
of climate in the shape and form of 
buildings and to propose new building 
forms and combinations of materials. 



To conduct further research into energy- 
conscious design utilizing local and recy- 
cled building materials not commonly 
found together in building design. A self- 
sufficient underground home was de- 
signed that incorporates a wind/sun elec- 
tric system, solar hot water and grey 
water systems. 



For a conference on urban conservation 
for landlords, tenants, and historic pres- 
ervationists. 



To support follow-up proceedings of the 
urban conservation conference, which 
was sponsored by the National Endow- 
ment for the Arts. 






Salt marshes and tidal flats make Virginia's Eastern Shore a fer- 
tile wildlife habitat. The Nature Conservancy's project here com- 
bines development with preservation of the area's natural values. 



80 CHAPTER TWO 



Seamon, David R. 
FY 1987 
$8,700 

87^216^152 
Contact: Kansas Stale 
University, Department of 
Architecture, Seaton Hall, 
Manhattan, KS 66506 



State of Arkansas 

FY 1978 

$30,000 

R80-42-57 

Contact: State Historic 

Preservation Officer, State 

of Arkansas. State Capitol, 

Little Rock, AR 72201 



State of Maine 

FY 1980 

$11,800 

02-4250066 

Contact: State of Maine, 

State House, Augusta, ME 

04330 



Tourbier, Joachim 

FY 1979 

$9,600 

91-4231-094 

Contact: 706 South Front 

Street. Philadelphia, PA 

19147 



Trust for Public Land 

FY 1985 

$19,500 

52-4231-0032 

Contact: President, Trust 

for Public Land, 82 Second 

Street, San Francisco, CA 

94105 



University City Science 
Center 
FY 1979 
$25,000 
92-4212-121 
Contact: Senior Vice- 
President, University City 
Science Center, 3624 
Science Center, 
Philadelphia, PA 19104 



To support a study for the design of a 
visitors' center at Olana, Frederick 
Church's estate overlooking the Hudson 
River in upstate New York. The research 
explores the processes of translating hu- 
man and environmental needs into suc- 
cessful environmental design. 



To formulate design considerations for 
Interstate Highway 1-630 in Little Rock, 
Arkansas. The aim was to reduce the 
highway's impact on historic neighbor- 
hoods and districts as well as on residen- 
tial and natural park areas. 



For publication and free distribution of 
the Land Use Handbook, a bilingual 
publication that won the highest award 
of the American Planning Association in 
1979. It discusses land use regulations 
and provides practical information about 
erosion, zoning and landscaping. 



To develop a planning method to protect 
environmental quality in industrialized 
nations where intensive uses stress natu- 
ral resource bases. A 1 34-page report, 
Convivial Technology Planning — A Con- 
cept Paper, documented the study. 



To develop design guidelines to protect 
agricultural landscapes, using Whatcom 
County, Washington, as a case study. 
This pilot program used a scenic assess- 
ment methodology developed by the Soil 
Conservation Service to identify areas of 
intrinsic beauty to be protected from dis- 
ruptive land development. 



For an energy management and design 
program measuring the feasibility and 
impact of solar applications within an ur- 
ban environment. A climate data digest 
for Philadelphia and fourteen topic re- 
ports were produced. 



University of Alaska 

FY 1977 

$20,000 

R7&42-58 

Contact: Institute of Social, 

Economic and Government 

Research, University of 

Alaska. Fairbanks, AK 

99701 



University of California, 

Berkeley 

FY 1985 

$39,990 

52-4252-0171 

Contact: Research 

Administrator, University of 

California, Berkeley. 

Berkeley. CA 94720 



University of Florida, 

Gainesville 

FY 1981 

$5,000 

1 2-4250-242 

Contact: Associate Dean for 

Research, University of 

Florida, 219 Grinter Hall, 

Gainesville, FL 32611 



University of Georgia 

FY 1980 

$4,800 

02-4250-117 

Contact: Dean, University 

of Georgia, School of 

Environmental Design, 

Athens, GA 30602 



University of 
Massachusetts, Amherst 
FY 1978 
$30,000 
R80-42-178N 
Contact: Associate 
Professor, University of 
Massachusetts, Amherst 
Campus, Amherst, MA 
01003 



University of Michigan 
FY 1984 
$23,300 
42-4252-0103 
Contact: Associate 
Professor, University of 
Michigan. School of 
Natural Resources, Ann 
Arbor, MI 48109 



To produce a report on the special re- 
quirements for design in the Arctic. The 
report, Arctic Community Design, syn- 
thesizes knowledge about design require- 
ments for work, residential and recre- 
ational environments and serves as a 
guide to Arctic planning and construc- 
tion. 



To conduct research on the street-level 
effects of high-rise building form, includ- 
ing wind-tunnel effects and undesirable 
sunless spaces. The research includes 
tests both in the laboratory and on site. 



For translation expenses for a confer- 
ence, "Environmental Design for the Fu- 
ture of the Caribbean Basin," sponsored 
by the University of Florida. An exten- 
sive report on the proceedings was is- 
sued. 



For the quarterly student publication, 
Georgia Landscape, dealing with envi- 
ronmental design and planning issues. 



To conduct research on decentralized so- 
lar energy use in a rural/small town 
community and to evaluate its impact on 
the visual quality of the environment. 



For research on the way that large-scale 
decisions about natural resources affect 
the quality of the American landscape. A 
report addressed this question, with a 
view to bridging the gap between theory 
and the practical considerations that 
guide decision-makers in the field. 



DESIGN FOR THE ENVIRONMENT 8 1 



University of Minnesota 
FY 1979 
$10,000 
92-4212-056 
Contact: Associate 
Professor, University of 
Minnesota. Department of 
Landscape Architecture, 
Minneapolis, MN 55455 



University of Oregon 

FY 1980 

$28,600 

02-4252-148 

Contact: Assistant Professor, 

University of Oregon, 

Department of 

Architecture, Eugene, OR 

97403 



University of Oregon 

FY 1982 

$36,191 

22-4252-080 

Contact: Associate Professor 

of Architecture, University 

of Oregon, Department of 

Architecture, Eugene, OR 

97403 



University of Oregon 
FY 1986 
$20,300 
86-4231-0075 
Contact: Acting Vice- 
President, Research, 
University of Oregon, Main 
Campus, Eugene, OR 97403 



University of Southern 

California 

FY 1977 

$17,000 

R70-42-64C 

Contact: Professor, 

University of Southern 

California. School of 

Architecture and Fine Arts, 

Los Angeles, CA 90007 



University of Southern 
California 
FY 1978 
$16,997 
R8a42-l21C 
Contact: University of 
Southern California, Los 
Angeles, CA 90027 



For a conference and exhibition on pres- 
ervation and design alternatives for the 
St. Croix valley in Minnesota. The valley 
is the boundary area between Wisconsin 
and Minnesota and is one of the fastest 
growing areas in the upper Midwest. It 
includes diverse wild areas and a historic 
heritage spanning 1 50 years. 



To produce a design manual on climate- 
sensitive design. The aim was to analyze 
climate patterns and architectural design 
measures that enhance energy conserva- 
tion. Buildings account for some thirty 
percent of national energy consumption 
and are an area in which significant sav- 
ings could be made. 



To produce guidelines for the design of 
exterior spaces that utilize wind and sun 
as major contributing design elements. A 
report, Access to the Sun and Wind: The 
Formation of Public Spaces, includes 
analyses of climate patterns and associa- 
tive architecture responses that aid cli- 
mate-sensitive design. 



To develop a computer model to study 
the implications of proposed changes in 
the natural and cultural landscape of the 
Columbia River Gorge. The design dem- 
onstration concentrated on a 250-square- 
mile area from North Bonneville, Wash- 
ington, to Mosier, Oregon, and four 
computerized models of scenic and eco- 
nomic ramifications were generated. 



To produce a manual of design concepts 
concerning access rights to sunlight. Pub- 
lic policy and private development feasi- 
bility were also considered. 



To investigate the architectural and ur- 
ban design implications of "sun rights" 
and to apply these to solar energy de- 
signs for planned units varying in size 
from one standard lot to a city block. A 
$3,400 amendment, grant number 02- 
4250-904.1, was made in 1980. 



University of Tennessee 

FY 1981 

$16,000 

12-4252-042 

Contact: Dean, Graduate 

Studies and Research, 

University of Tennessee, 

Knoxville, TN 37916 



University of Texas 

FY 1977 

$6,000 

R70-42-43 

Contact: Dean, University 

of Texas, School of 

Architecture, Arlington, TX 

76010 



University of Washington 

FY 1986 

$15,000 

86-4252-0057 

Contact: Contracts and 

Grants Officer, University 

of Washington, Seattle, WA 

98195 



University of Wisconsin, 

Milwaukee 

FY 1986 

$30,000 

86-4252-0056 

Contact: Assistant Dean, 

University of Wisconsin, 

Milwaukee, RO. Box 340, 

Graduate School, 

Milwaukee, WI 53201 



Van Dresser, Peter 

FY 1978 

$9,000 

R81-42-35N 

Contact: 634 Garcia Street, 

Santa Fe. NM 87501 



Villccco, Marguerite 

FY 1981 

$61,500 

CA 81-39 

Contact: 434 15th Street, 

N.E., Washington, DC 

20003 



For a feasibility study on alternatives for 
achieving household energy conservation, 
including modifications in household de- 
sign and human behavior. A report. Be- 
havioral and Design Implications of Liv- 
ing with Passive Solar Energy and 
Woodburning, was issued. 



To prepare graphic materials and the 
layout for Environmental Encounters: 
Experiences in Decision-making for the 
Built and Natural Environment. The 
book was derived from a field-tested pi- 
lot course on design and environmental 
decision-making and was published in 
1979. 



To determine the response of vernacular 
architecture to climate through a study 
of the photographic archives of the Na- 
tional Geographic Society and the 
Smithsonian Museum of Natural His- 
tory. The aim was to develop a method 
for translating anthropological research 
into useful and fundamental design prin- 
ciples. 



To explore ways of integrating a design 
aesthetic into highway planning. The 
study, entitled The Integration of High- 
way and Landforms, outlined design con- 
cepts and criteria for quality design and 
beautification of highways. It was writ- 
ten by Kent Mitchell Keegan. 



To incorporate solar-energy principles 
into domestic folk architecture. The aim 
was produce a design for a prototype 
dwelling. 



For research, consultation and associated 
services aimed at integrating design and 
energy concerns into existing Endowment 
programs. 



82 CHAPTER TWO 



Way. Douglas S. 

FY 1982 

$5,000 

2M2I3-188 

Contact: Associate 

Professor, Harvard 

University, Department of 

Landscape Architecture, 

417 Gund Hall, Cannbridge, 

MA 02138 



Western Stale College of 

Colorado 

FY 1979 

$17,500 

92-1233-262 

Contact: Western State 

College of Colorado, 

Gunnison, CO 81230 



Wolf, Peter M. 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

91-4231-095 

Contact: 325 West End 

Avenue. New York, NY 

10023 



Woollett, William 

FY 1984 

$10,000 

41-4213-0152 

Contact: 300 Hot Springs 

Road, Santa Barbara, CA 

93108 



To develop techniques of spatial data 
processing compatible with satellite pho- 
tographic imaging systems, and to apply 
the techniques to land use planning and 
site evaluation. 



For studies by landscape architects, de- 
signers and economists giving prelimi- 
nary growth predictions, economic and 
environmental impact analyses of the val- 
ley between Gunnison and Crested 
Butte, Colorado. The valley was the ob- 
ject of rapid development. 



To research a book entitled Lxind in 
America: Its Value, Use and Control. 
The book addresses environmental regu- 
lation, conservation of private land, 
speculation, farmland and preservation. 
It was published in 1981 by Pantheon 
Books. 



To complete a lithograph series on the 
Hoover Dam and to prepare the text for 
a limited-edition book. The lithographs 
trace the history of the dam's construc- 
tion and final views were added to round 
out the chronicle. The book was pub- 
lished in 1986 and is entitled Hoover 
Dam: Drawings, Etchings. Lithographs, 
1931- 1933. 



Parks and Open Spaces 

Programs that preserve and maintain natural refuges, na- 
ture trails, botanical gardens and zoos. Includes projects to 
transform blighted areas into parks, gardens and recre- 
ational open spaces. 



Administration and 

Management Research 

Corporation of New York 

City 

FY 1977 

$12,220 

R70-42-31 

Contact: Project Director, 

Administration and 

Management Research 

Corporation of New York 

City, 250 Broadway. New 

York, NY 10007 



Atlanta Botanical Garden, 

Inc. 

FY 1986 

$25,000 

86-4256-0028 

Contact: Director, Atlanta 

Botanical Garden, Inc., PO. 

Box 77246, Atlanta, GA 

30357 



Barton, Cheryl 
FY 1983 
$10,000 
31-4213-00007 
Contact: Director of 
Landscape Architecture, 
Miller, Wihry, Lee, Inc., 
2143 Belcourt Avenue, 
Nashville, TN 37212 



Behan. Cynthia Barbero 
FY 1983 
$4,400 

31-4212-00003 
Contact: University of 
Massachusetts, Department 
of Landscape Architecture, 
Amherst, MA 01003 



Buffalo Friends of Olmsted 

Parks, Inc. 

FY 1986 

$30,000 

86-4231-0076 

Contact: President, Buffalo 

Friends of Olmsted Parks, 

Inc., PO. Box 590, Buffalo, 

NY 14205 



To hold workshops and prepare materials 
for a city-wide environmental education 
program. Students designed thematic 
walking tours of their school neighbor- 
hoods and produced annotated maps for 
the tours, and a report was issued. Walk- 
ing: A Realistic Approach to Environ- 
mental Education. The program was ad- 
ministered by the New York City's 
Council on the Environment. 



To produce a film on the history and de- 
sign of Piedmont Park for exhibition at 
the visitors' center planned for the At- 
lanta Botanical Garden (located in the 
park). The goal of the film was to inform 
residents and visitors about design issues 
critical to the park's future. 



To design and plan the reclamation of an 
abandoned quarry for use as a commu- 
nity park and facility for the arts. The 
quarry, located in Gainesboro, Tennes- 
see, is situated in a rapidly urbanizing 
section of the town. 



To study the reuse potential of aban- 
doned canals for recreational purposes. 
Several American and foreign canal res- 
torations were examined and one exam- 
ple in New England was studied in close 
detail. A book. Revitalizing Abandoned 
Canals for Recreation, was also pub- 
lished. 



To develop a restoration master plan for 
the 155-acre South Park Arboretum, de- 
signed in 1 894 by Frederick Law Olm- 
sted. Changing priorities and neglect 
have brought about the park's deteriora- 
tion but its basic structure remains in- 
tact. 



DESIGN FOR THE ENVIRONMENT 83 



Buffalo Organization for 

Social and Technological 

Innovation 

FY 1981 

$37,460 

12-4252-208 

Contact: President, Buffalo 

Organization Tor Social and 

Technological Innovation, 

1479 Hertel Avenue, 

Buffalo, NY 14216 



Cambridge Arts Council 

FY 1979 

$15,000 

92-4233-176 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Cambridge Arts Council, 

City Hall Annex, 57 Inman 

Street, Cambridge, MA 

02139 



Central Park Conservancy 

FY 1983 

$20,000 

32-4250^0028 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Central Park Conservancy, 

830 Fifth Avenue, New 

York, NY 10021 



Central Park Conservancy 

FY 1984 

$10,000 

42-4256-0044 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Central Park Conservancy, 

The Arsenal, 830 Fifth 

Avenue, New York, NY 

10021 



Central Park Conservancy 
FY 1986 
$5,000 

86-4256-0092 
Contact: Central Park 
Conservancy, 830 Fifth 
Avenue, New York, NY 
10021 



City of Blue Island 

FY 1980 

$9,930 

02-4254-047 

Contact: Director, City of 

Blue Island, Department of 

Planning and Community 

Development, 13051 

Greenwood Avenue, Blue 

Island. I L 60406 



To publish Controlling Vandalism in 
Recreational Facilities. The report pro- 
vides design guideHnes for preventing 
vandalism and is written both for design- 
ers and recreational facilities staff. 



To incorporate artists into the planning 
process to generate more aesthetic uses 
of blighted and vacant land, as part of 
the council's Parklet program. 



To begin compilation of a library and in- 
dex of all planning and historic materials 
pertaining to New York City's Central 
Park. The aim was to gather one hun- 
dred years' worth of design and planning 
history in anticipation of the park's res- 
toration and renovation. 



To design and produce a public presenta- 
tion on the master plan for the restora- 
tion, management and financing of Cen- 
tral Park. A year-long educational 
program was planned. 



For a case history on the rebuilding of 
Central Park, with special emphasis on 
methodology, landscape restoration tech- 
niques and public-private partnerships. 



For design and landscape planning of a 
community park. The goals of the plan 
were to link neighborhoods through de- 
sign continuity and enhance the aesthet- 
ics of the waterfront. 



City of Cincinnati 
FY 1979 
$12,000 
92-4233-178 
Contact: Director, 
Department of City 
Planning, City Hall, 
Cincinnati, OH 45202 



City of Minneapolis 
FY 1979 
$15,000 
92-4233-236 
Contact: City of 
Minneapolis, City Hall, 
Minneapolis, MN 55415 



City of St. Louis 

FY 1977 

$11,500 

R70-42-15B 

Contact: Commissioner of 

Parks, City of St. Louis, 

Department of Parks, 

Recreation and Forestry, 

5600 Clayton Road, St. 

Louis, MO 631 10 



City of Salem 

FY 1977 

$15,000 

R70-42-12B 

Contact: City Planner, City 

of Salem, Planning 

Department, One Salem 

Green, Salem, MA 01970 



City of St. Cloud 

FY 1977 

$29,980 

R70-42-20B 

Contact: Director, City of 

St. Cloud, Housing and 

Redevelopment Authority. 

Fifth Avenue North, St. 

Cloud, MN 56301 



City of Texarkana 

FY 1980 

$7,500 

02-4254-054 

Contact: City Manager, 

City of Texarkana, RO. Box 

1967, Texarkana. TX 75501 



To identify, inventory and evaluate ur- 
ban natural areas and to develop a pro- 
gram of conservation and aesthetic man- 
agement. Natural areas were defined as 
largely undeveloped areas outside of park 
systems that support some native vegeta- 
tion and wildlife. The Cincinnati Urban 
Natural Areas Study resulted from the 
project. 



To prepare a master site plan for the Ar- 
mory Gardens area. The plan recom- 
mended that a combined park and plaza 
be developed and that a link between the 
Walker Art Center and the Guthrie The- 
ater be established. 



To design a unifying system of pathways, 
informational graphics, lighting and 
street furniture as part of an environmen- 
tal interaction system for St. Louis's For- 
est Park. The goal was to create a coordi- 
nated approach to design, selection, and 
placement of small-scale improvements 
for the 1 ,400-acre park. 



To design a waterfront park and access 
routes for a former railroad right-of-way 
in Salem, Massachusetts. The plan called 
for development of the land as a water- 
front park that would connect an existing 
public beach and a historic residential 
area. 



To design a system of paths for pedestri- 
ans and cyclists along a half-mile section 
of St. Cloud's river frontage on the Mis- 
sissippi. The project served as a test site 
for the eventual creation of a system 
along both sides of the river, intercon- 
necting residential areas, parks and 
downtown. 



To design a park facility along a storm 
drainage waterway in Texarkana, Texas, 
known as Deutschman's canal. The aim 
was to combine practical flood-control 
engineering and historic preservation to 
create a neighborhood park. 



84 CHAPTER TWO 



Cleveland Tenants 
Organization 
FY 1983 
$14,437 
32-423(WX)064 
Contact: Project 
Coordinator. Cleveland 
Tenants Organization, 530 
Euclid Avenue. Suite 213, 
Cleveland, OH 441 15 



Comprehensive Planning 

Organization 

FY 1978 

$19,275 

R8a42-43 

Contact: Urban Designer. 

Comprehensive Planning 

Organization. 1 200 Third 

Avenue, Suite 524. San 

Diego. CA 92101 



Conservation Foundation 
FY 1977 
$5,000 

R7O-12-20OCN 
Contact: Conservation 
Foundation, 1717 
Massachusetts Avenue, 
N.W., Washington, DC 
20036 



County of Gunnison 
FY 1980 
$8,000 
02^230-231 
Contact: City 
Administrator. Gunnison 
County. 200 East Virginia. 
Gunnison, CO 81230 



Crossroads Community 

(The Farm) 

FY 1979 

$20,000 

92^233-065 

Contact: President, 

Crossroads Community 

(The Farm). 1499 Potrero 

Avenue, San Francisco, CA 

94110 



Cultural Council 

Foundation 

FY 1981 

$20,000 

12-4230-053 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Cultural Council 

Foundation, 175 Fifth 

Avenue, New York, NY 

10010 



For technical assistance in landscape de- 
sign for six neighborhoods in Cleveland. 
Landscape designers worked with neigh- 
borhood groups to discuss practical ways 
in which blighted areas might be con- 
verted to neighborhood recreational use. 



To produce Canyons, an educational pro- 
gram on the canyons of the San Diego 
region. The program covered their natu- 
ral history, contribution to the region's 
quality of life, preservation and current 
issues surrounding them. 



For a seminar on key issues raised by 
President Carter's proposal for a Heri- 
tage Trust program. 



To develop a recreational plan for the ur- 
ban and wilderness areas in Gunnison 
County, Colorado, as part of an effort to 
maintain the quality of life in this area. 



To plan design work for additions to the 
nature/arts complex known as The Farm 
in San Francisco. The Farm is located 
adjacent to a major freeway interchange 
and provides a respite from the mono- 
lithic concrete freeway. 



To restore the area of Central Park 
(known as the Mall) to the original de- 
sign of Frederick Law Olmsted and Cal- 
vert Vaux and to redesign an adjacent 
area, Rumsey Playground, to accommo- 
date new uses. The aim of the plan was 
to divert park-goers from the heavily 
used mall to the lightly used playground. 



Dallas Zoological Society 
FY 1985 
$25,000 
52-4256-0106 
Contact: Second Vice- 
President, Dallas Zoological 
Society, 400 South Zang, 
Suite515, Dallas, TX 75208 



Elizabeth Cady Stanton 

Foundation 

FY 1987 

$110,000 

NEA DCA 87-17 

Contact: Elizabeth Cady 

Stanton Foundation, P.O. 

Box 603. Seneca Falls, NY 

13148 



Friends of the City Park 

FY 1985 

$30,000 

52-4257-0074 

Contact: President, Friends 

of the City Park, Casino 

Building, City Park, New 

Orleans, LA 70119 



Fund for Preservation of 
Wildlife and Natural Areas 
FY 1978 
$50,000 
R80-42-157 
Contact: Fund for 
Preservation of Wildlife and 
Natural Areas. 1 75 Federal 
Street. Boston, MA 021 10 



Fund for the Preservation of 

Wildlife and Natural Areas 

FY 1979 

$25,000 

92-4233-183 

Contact: Project Director, 

Fund for the Preservation of 

Wildlife and Natural Areas, 

One Boston Place, Boston, 

MA 02106 



French and Pickering 

Creeks Conservation Trust 

FY 1986 

$5,000 

86-4231-0010 

Contact: President, French 

and Pickering Creeks 

Conservation Trust. PO. 

Box 360. R.D. 2, Pottstown, 

PA 19464 



For a symposium and design charette 
(hosted by the University of Texas at Ar- 
lington) to develop design solutions for a 
habitat at the Dallas Zoo for a breeding 
group of gorillas — to provide optimal 
conditions for the gorillas to propagate. 



To conduct and manage a national de- 
sign competition for the Women's Rights 
National Historical Park in Seneca Falls, 
New York. 



To conduct a national one-stage design 
competition for an overall landscape de- 
sign for a forty-acre arboretum in City 
Park in New Orleans. A videotape 
documenting the competition was pro- 
duced. 



To conduct research to determine owner- 
ship of land, obtain real estate appraisals 
and develop conditional purchase-and- 
sale agreements in an effort to protect 
threatened urban wildsites and natural 
areas in Boston. 



To support an aesthetic management 
program for small natural-area parks in 
urban settings. 



To formulate a preservation plan for the 
upper reaches of French Creek. The aim 
was to examine both ecological and his- 
torical aspects of the stream valley as 
part of an effort to preserve the area 
from encroaching development. 



DESIGN FOR THE ENVIRONMENT 85 



George Washington 

University 

FY 1979 

$18,000 

92^233-070 

Contact: Project Director, 

George Washington 

University, Department of 

Urban and Regional 

Planning, Washington, DC 

20052 



Georgia Institute of 

Technology 

FY 1979 

$30,000 

92-4233-128 

Contact: Associate 

Professor, Georgia Institute 

of Technology, Atlanta, GA 

30332 



Haag. Richard L. 

FY 198) 

$8,500 

11-4213-088 

Contact: 2926 Fuhrman 

Avenue East, Seattle, WA 

98102 



Hackensack Meadowlands 

Development Commission 

FY 1986 

$25,000 

86-4231-0013 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Hackensack Meadowlands 

Development Commission, 

One DeKorte Park Plaza, 

Lyndhurst, NJ07071 



Holt, Nancy and Gates, 

Cassandra 

FY 1985 

$5,000 

51-4213-0145 

Contact: 799 Greenwich 

Street. New York, NY 

I0OI4 



Kaiser, Harvey H. 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R8I-42-32N 

Contact: 304 Brookford 

Road, Syracuse, NY 13224 



To develop a prototype conservation dis- 
trict plan for suburban areas. The pur- 
pose of the districts was to guard against 
blighting influences threatening the man- 
made and natural suburban environment. 
The plan recommended controls, incen- 
tives and procedures for preservation. 



To prepare a plan for urban parks, 
recreation and open spaces using innova- 
tive approaches to the concept of urban 
recreation and the means by which 
recreation facilities and services are pro- 
vided. Spatial computer applications to 
park and recreational planning were 
used. 



To study the potential for converting ob- 
solete industrial plants and military bases 
into parks and recreation centers. 



To formulate plans for the reclamation 
of a solid-waste landfill, Hackensack 
Meadowlands, located along one of the 
most traveled corridors on the eastern 
seaboard. Artist Nancy Holt was com- 
missioned to assist engineers and land- 
scape architects in the design of the 
project. 



To create preliminary designs for Sky 
Mound, a work of art to transform a 
solid-waste landfill in Kearney, New Jer- 
sey. The site is seen by millions; it is lo- 
cated adjacent to the New Jersey Turn- 
pike, and is visible from Amtrak and air. 



To prepare a report on the architecture 
of the Great Camps of the Adirondack 
Mountains. 



Kaiser, Harvey H. 

FY 1983 

$10,000 

31-4213-00152 

Contact: 304 Brookford 

Road, Syracuse, NY 13224 



Ketchum, Morris, Jr. 

FY 1978 

$5,000 

R81-42-22N 

Contact: 200 East 66th 

Street, New York, NY 

10021 



King County Arts 

Commission 

FY 1979 

$17,750 

92-4212-149 

Contact: Symposium 

Coordinator, King County 

Arts Commission, 300 King 

County Adminstration 

Building, Seattle, WA 

98104 



Kluesing, Cherie L. 

FY 1981 

$5,000 

1M212-114 

Contact: 503 South Race 

Street, Urbana, IL 61801 



Landmark Art Projects 
FY 1985 
$30,000 
52-4231-0024 
Contact: President, 
Landmark Art Projects, 
PO. Box 3172, La JoUa, 
CA 92038 



Landscape Architecture 

Foundation 

FY 1983 

$12,000 

32-425a<X)110 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Landscape Architecture 

Foundation, 1733 

Connecticut Avenue, N.W., 

Washington, DC 20009 



To conduct research on architectural his- 
toric landmarks in national parks in the 
western United States. The structures 
range from cabins to hotels, and many 
are threatened by overuse, inadequate 
maintenance or abandonment. 



To prepare a three-volume nontechnical 
book. Animals, Men and Zoos. Areas 
covered included safari zoos, desert mu- 
seums, national parks, zoological gardens 
and city zoos. 



For a symposium and exhibition entitled 
"Earthworks: Land Reclamation and 
Sculpture," which focused on the design 
possibilities of abused land. 



To study aesthetic approaches to land 
reclamation. In a report. Reclamation 
Works, individual projects undertaken by 
the public and landscape artists were ex- 
amined. 



For design development, site selection 
and planning of the Museum of Seasonal 
Change. The project aimed to demon- 
strate the sculptural potential of a ne- 
glected public site by using deciduous 
trees and changing seasonal plantings in 
a collaboration of artists and landscape 
architects. 



To complete a short film, Designing 
Environments, by landscape architect 
Lawrence Halprin. The film documents 
workshop sessions of designers and the 
public in which the concept of design for 
all people, including accessibility for the 
disabled, is applied to a San Francisco 
park. 



86 CHAPTER TWO 



New Jersey Conservation 

Foundation 

FY 1978 

SI 8.630 

R8(M2^9 

Contact: Assistant Director, 

New Jersey Conservation 

Foundation. 300 Mendham 

Road. Morristown, NJ 

07960 



New York Foundation for 

the Arts 

FY 1983 

$25,000 

32-425^00042 

Contact: Executive Director, 

New York Foundation for 

the Arts, 5 Beekman Street. 

Suite 600, New York. NY 

10038 



New York Zoological 

Society 

FY 1981 

$15,000 

12^230073 

Contact: Exhibits Curator, 

New York Zoological 

Society, Bronx Zoo, 

Exhibits and Graphics, 

Bronx, NY 10460 



Open Lands Project 

FY 1977 

$1,300 

R7a42-I46 

Contact: Director. Open 

Lands Project, 53 West 

Jackson Boulevard. 

Chicago, IL 60604 



President and Fellows of 

Harvard College 

FY 1984 

$39,570 

42-4252-0102 

Contact: Associate Dean, 

Harvard College, Office of 

Sponsored Research, 

Holyoke Center, Fourth 

Floor, Cambridge, MA 

02138 



President and Fellows of 

Harvard College 

FY 1985 

$35,840 

52-4252-0130 

Contact: Associate Director. 

Office of Sponsored 

Research, Holyoke Center, 

Fourth Floor, Cambridge, 

MA 02138 



For phase one of Rails to Trails, to inven- 
tory abandoned railroad rights-of-way 
and determine those most suitable for 
recreational and open-space users. 



For a film documenting the transforma- 
tion of vacant, rubble-strewn spaces into 
gardens, parks and city farms by com- 
munity gardening groups in New York 
City. 



For the environmental planning and de- 
sign phase of a park improvement pro- 
gram for the revitalization and rehabili- 
tation of the Bronx Zoo. 



For a study of Grant Park in Chicago. 
The aim was to recommend policies and 
design strategies for the park and the ad- 
jacent land, which was threatened by 
development pressures. A report, Grant 
Park Tomorrow: The Future of Chica- 
go's Front Yard, was issued. 



To formulate open space uses of vacant 
urban lands beyond their usual recre- 
ational or aesthetic functions. The study 
analyzed vacant land issues in Boston, 
Cincinnati and Denver, and a report. 
Harnessing the Open Space Potential of 
Vacant Urban Lands, was issued. 



To study design maintenance and con- 
servation of public open spaces. In the 
past, parks have been designed without 
consideration for upkeep and mainte- 
nance, resulting in derelict or deteriorat- 
ing landscapes. A partnership of design 
practitioners, government and commu- 
nity representatives addressed the prob- 
lem and produced a report on the issue. 



President and Fellows of 

Harvard College 

FY 1987 

$20,000 

87-4251-0004 

Contact: Assistant Director, 

Harvard College. Holyoke 

Center, Fourth Floor, 1350 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

Cambridge, MA 02138 



Project for Public Spaces 

FY 1980 

$20,000 

02-4252-150 

Contact: Director, Project 

for Public Spaces, 875 

Avenue of the Americas, 

New York, NY 10001 



Rapid Recovery, Inc. 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R80-42-169 

Contact: Assistant Director, 

Rapid Recovery, 1404 East 

Ninth Street, Cleveland, 

OH 44114 



Rhodeside, Elliott I. 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R71-42-59N 

Contact: Principal, EDAW, 

Inc., 720 North Saint Asaph 

Street, Suite 406, 

Alexandria, VA 22314 



Sculpture in the 

Environment, Inc. 

FY 1982 

$15,000 

22-4250-153 

Contact: President, 

Sculpture in the 

Environment, Inc. (SITE), 

83 Spring Street, New 

York, NY 10012 



Steinitz, Carl 

FY 1980 

$4,000 

01-4210^82 

Contact: 44 Martin Street, 

Cambridge, MA 02138 



For the Adopt a Park project, part of the 
Public Space Partnerships program. The 
city's parks department, community 
groups and students from a local school 
collaborated to produce a design to re- 
habilitate a park in Roxbury. 



To prepare an illustrated booklet and 
other materials on management of open 
public spaces. The booklet covers topics 
such as maintenance, security, parking, 
temporary enterprises and performing 
arts. A $20,000 amendment, grant num- 
ber 12-4252-9006, was made in 1981. 



To employ architects and artists in the 
clean-up and beautification of a rapid- 
transit right-of-way in Cleveland, Ohio. 



For documentation of the Boston Urban 
Wilds study, an urban natural area con- 
servation program, as a model for other 
cities. 



To document the Brooklyn Lot Commu- 
nity Design Project, a process of reclaim- 
ing two empty lots in Brooklyn. The par- 
ticipation of students and community 
groups was an integral feature of the 
project. 



To produce a videotape, entitled Broken 
Serenities, and other materials 
documenting the changes occurring in 
Gunnison County, Colorado, as a result 
of mining and recreational development. 
The materials also describe alternatives 
that may mitigate harmful impacts. 



DESIGN FOR THE ENVIRONMENT 87 



Steinitz, Carl F. 

FY 1981 

$5,000 

11-4213-175 

Contact: Harvard Graduate 

School of Design, 

Department of Landscape 

Architecture, 417 Gund 

Hall, Cambridge, MA 

02138 



Sugarloaf Regional Trails, 

Inc. 

FY 1984 

$30,000 

42-4231-0075 

Contact: Chairman, 

Sugarloaf Regional Trails, 

Inc., 23720 Mount Ephraim 

Road, Dickerson, MD 

20842 



Trust for the Public Land 

FY 1978 

$15,000 

R80-42-3I 

Contact: Director of 

Training, The Trust for the 

Public Land, 82 Second 

Street, San Francisco, CA 

94105 



Trustees of the University of 

Pennsylvania 

FY 1987 

$30,000 

87-4251-0067 

Contact: Assistant Director, 

Research Administration, 

University of Pennsylvania, 

3451 Walnut Street, 

Philadelphia, PA 19104 



Ukeles, Mierle Laderman 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

91-4232-167 

Contact: 4555 Henry 

Hudson Parkway, No. 1003, 

Riverdale, NY 10471 



University of California, 

Davis 

FY 1986 

$20,000 

86-4231-0009 

Contact: Associate Dean, 

Research, University of 

California-Davis, Davis, CA 

95616 



To prepare a one-hour scripted slide 
presentation on the potential impact of 
change on the recreation resources of 
Gunnison County and the Gunnison Na- 
tional Forest. 



For a study on central city parks of ac- 
knowledged design excellence, the land- 
scape architects who designed them and 
the public officials who maintain and 
preserve them. A design contest was held 
in conjunction with the study, and of the 
sixty-five entrants, Druid Hill Park in 
Baltimore was selected as the winner. 



To conduct seminars and produce ma- 
terials on recycling vacant urban lands 
for recreational and open space uses. The 
efforts were part of a larger program to 
train community leaders in this process. 



To develop a manual and other materials 
describing how to manage, restore and 
reclaim natural landscapes within the 
city. An ecological design approach was 
used — one that considers environmental 
problems as inseparable from the design 
aesthetic. 



To create plans for design competitions 
in which landscape architects, planners 
and environmental artists would produce 
designs for parklands on completed gar- 
bage landfills in New York City. 



To celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of 
the California Botanical Garden by invit- 
ing nine environmental designers and art- 
ists to the university for a series of design 
events. The aim was to provide a show- 
case for the environmental arts. 



University of Pennsylvania 

FY 1984 

$40,000 

42-4252-0108 

Contact: Assistant Director, 

Office of Research 

Administration, 409 

Franklin, Building I 16, 

3451 Walnut Street, 

Philadelphia, PA 19104 



Village of Seneca Falls 

FY 1987 

$19,500 

87-4251-0075 

Contact: Mayor, Village of 

Seneca Falls, 60 State 

Street, Seneca Falls, NY 

13148 



Washington State 

University 

FY 1983 

$5,000 

32-4250-00123 

Contact: Assistant Professor, 

Washington State 

University, Department of 

Horticulture, Pullman, WA 

99164 



Yosemile Natural History 

Association 

FY 1983 

$29,970 

32-4230-00092 

Contact: General Manager, 

Yosemite Natural History 

Association, Yosemite 

National Park, Yosemite, 

CA 95389 



Yuma Crossing Park 

Council 

FY 1983 

$30,000 

32-4230-00004 

Contact: President, Yuma 

Crossing Park Council, PO. 

Box 1583, Yuma, AZ 85364 



For an interdisciplinary research report. 
Open Space Choices for Inner-City 
Neighborhoods. The report studied land- 
scape design options for the Philadelphia 
inner-city neighborhood of West Kings- 
ton and focused on problems common to 
many cities in the Northeast and Mid- 
west: depopulation, industrial decline, 
vast tracts of vacant land and inadequate 
maintenance. 



For documentation and dissemination of 
information pertaining to the national de- 
sign competition for the Women's Rights 
National Historical Park in Seneca Falls, 
cosponsored by the National Endowment 
for the Arts and the National Park Ser- 
vice. 



For the research and data-collecting 
phases of an illustrated survey of out- 
standing state park design. 



For the Yosemite-Tioga Road Corridor 
Study. The study evaluated the implica- 
tions of the General Park Management 
Plan, its goals and policies, on landscape 
design. Issues considered included con- 
servation, public use and power, timber 
and water development. 



To develop a master plan for future 
development of Yuma Crossing Park, a 
National Historical Landmark. The aims 
of the new plan were to provide for a 
greater number of park visitors, to ad- 
dress issues related to the revitalization 
of historic downtown Yuma and to pre- 
serve the heritage of the Quechan tribe. 



88 CHAPTER TWO 



Waterfront Projects 

Design projects for coastal areas, riverfronts and lakefronts. 
Includes multiuse waterfronts, public parks and recreational 



areas. 



America the Beautiful Fund 

FY 1978 

$12,500 

R8a42-i: 

Contact: 

America i 

Fund, 2 H 

Building, ' 

20005 



I25CN 

■ Executive Director, 
; the Beautiful 
19 Shoreham 
, Washington, DC 



Architectural Foundation of 

Northern California 

FY 1981 

$12,000 

12-425^006 

Contact: Project Director, 

Architectural Foundation of 

Northern California, 790 

Market Street, San 

Francisco, CA 94102 



Boston Educational Marine 

Exchange 

FY 1978 

$23,000 

R8^42-36 

Contact: Boston Educational 

Marine Fund, 54 Lewis 

Wharf, Boston, MA 021 10 



Bronx River Restoration 
Project 
FY 1978 
$18,000 
R80^2-37 

Contact: Director, Long- 
Term Planning, Bronx River 
Restoration Project, 375 
East Fordham Road, Bronx, 
NY 10458 



Bronx River Restoration 

Project 

FY 1979 

$28,500 

92-4212-141 

Contact: Project Director, 

Bronx River Restoration 

Project, 375 East Fordham 

Road, New York, NY 

10458 



To prepare a study of a corridor along 
the Potomac River and its proposed zon- 
ing as an urban conservation area. A co- 
alition of twenty-five civic associations 
was involved in the process, and the 
study provides guidance for citizen par- 
ticipation in the county's decision-making 
process. A report entitled Urban Con- 
servation Areas: Their Meaning and Im- 
plementation resulted. 



To develop materials and tools to aid pol- 
icy-makers in making design decisions af- 
fecting coastal development and con- 
servation. 



To investigate the feasibility of a multi- 
ple-use marine research and education 
facility in the Boston Harbor Islands. 
The study's main focus was the reuse po- 
tential of buildings at Fort Andrews on 
Peddock's Island. A report. Help Save 
an Island, was issued. 



To prepare a master plan for a linear 
park along the Bronx River. The aims 
were to improve the physical environ- 
ment with recreational trails and other 
facilities, provide jobs, establish opportu- 
nities for small businesses and create in- 
centives for upgrading the river's water 
quality. 



To create a documentary film and a re- 
port on the revitalization of the Bronx 
River. The materials document the 
development master plan and the activi- 
ties of the Youth Conservation Corps in 
the course of constructing a mini-park 
and an environmental arts center. 



City of Beverly 

FY 1981 

$20,000 

12-4230-018 

Contact: Planning Director, 

City of Beverly, Planning 

Department, 191 Cabot 

Street, Beverly, MA 01915 



City of Charleston 
FY 1985 
$40,420 
52-4257-0049 
Contact: Mayor, City of 
Charleston, City Hall, 80 
Broad Street, Charleston, 
SC 29401 



City of New York 

FY 1980 

$20,000 

02-4250-131 

Contact: Project Director, 

City of New York, 330 East 

26th Street, New York, NY 

10010 



City of Stamford 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

92-4233-182 

Contact: Project Director, 

429 Atlantic Street, 

Stamford, CT 06901 



Conservation Foundation 

FY 1977 

$15,000 

R70-42-169 

Contact: Coastal Zone 

Management Program, 

Conservation Foundation, 

1717 Massachusetts 

Avenue, N.W., Washington, 

DC 20036 



County of San Mateo 

FY 1978 

$20,815 

R8a42-52 

Contact: Senior Planner, 

County of San Mateo, 

County Government Center, 

Redwood City, CA 94063 



To prepare a cultural development plan 
for the historic waterfront of Beverly, 
Massachusetts. The plan promotes cul- 
tural activities in the waterfront area and 
surrounding neighborhood and develops 
an interpretive trail linking the water- 
front and the adjacent historic district, 
Fish Flake Hill. 



To conduct a national two-stage architec- 
tural competition for the design of a pub- 
lic aquarium on Charleston's waterfront. 
The aquarium was designed to take full 
advantage of the commanding site. 



To support cooperation between local 
government, a design team and develop- 
ers in the billion-dollar waterfront project 
area. The aim was to demonstrate to de- 
velopers that it is possible to preserve 
environmental quality — to allow for open 
space, vistas, views and recreation — - 
within the context of the project. 



To develop a design plan for a riverwalk 
park along the Mill River in Stamford, 
Conecticut. 



To survey conservation activities in sea- 
port towns and identify major issues. The 
project was part of an effort to conserve 
the civic heritage of seaport towns in 
New England and the Mid-Atlantic re- 
gion. 



To develop a preservation and protection 
plan for San Mateo County's coastal 
zone, in conjunction with the formation 
of the Local Coastal Program. The aim 
was to guide new development in a man- 
ner compatible with the character of 
small rural villages such as San Gregorio 
and Pescadero. 



DESIGN FOR THE ENVIRONMENT 89 



Department of City 

Planning 

FY 1983 

$15,000 

32-4230-00087 

Contact: Urban Designer, 

Department of City 

Planning, 2 Lafayette 

Street, Room 1 503, New 

York, NY 10007 



Downtown Development 

Authority 

FY 1982 

$20,000 

22-4230-197 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Downtown Development 

Authority, 2099 One 

Biscayne Tower, Miami, FL 

33131 



Friends of the BlufT 

FY 1983 

$10,000 

32^25000104 

Contact: Chairman of the 

Board, Friends of the Bluff, 

RO. Box 577, Ocean Group 

Post Office, Swansea, MA 

02777 



Greater Boston Corporation 

FY 1985 

$10,000 

52-4231-0090 

Contact: President, Greater 

Boston Corporation, c/o 

Boston Chamber of 

Commerce, 125 High 

Street, Boston, MA 02110 



Institute for the 

Development of Evolutive 

Architecture 

FY 1984 

$20,000 

42-4256-0047 

Contact: Treasurer, Institute 

for the Development of 

Evolutive Architecture, 329 

Westcott Street, Syracuse, 

NY 13210 



To formulate a proposal to reclaim the 
waterfront of New York City's East 
River from Battery Park to 1 25th Street. 
An illustrated report was issued for Area 
1 (59th to 72nd Street). 



For the design of the Miami Commons 
on the waterfront in downtown Miami. 
The site was envisioned as a natural link- 
age to the remainder of the park system 
and to the city. Landscape architect and 
sculptor Isamu Noguchi developed plans 
for seven structures. 



To produce a videotape illustrating the 
design modifications proposed to improve 
barrier beaches in Massachusetts. A 
master plan for the beaches was created 
in 1980, and the film was intended to in- 
form the public about the difficulties in 
devising criteria for such areas and the 
solutions proposed by the plan. 



To plan for infrastructure improvements 
for a 100-acre land parcel in the Fort 
Point Channel area, a waterfront area 
immediately adjacent to downtown Bos- 
ton. The plan includes circulation pat- 
terns; spaces for recreation, parks and 
events; transportation networks, includ- 
ing bike and pedestrian paths, and public 
art. 



To produce a traveling exhibition enti- 
tled Towered Islands: The Castles and 
Cottages of the Thousand Islands Region 
of the St. Lawrence River. In prepara- 
tion for the exhibition, the palatial sum- 
mer houses, grand hotels and lakeside re- 
treats constructed at the turn of the 
century were surveyed and documented. 



Massachusetts Executive 

Office of Environmental 

Affairs 

FY 1981 

$25,000 

12-4230-068 

Contact: Harbor 

Coordinator, Massachusetts 

Office of Environmental 

Affairs, 100 Cambridge 

Street, Boston, MA 02202 



Massachusetts Executive 
Office of Environmental 
Affairs 
FY 1981 
$14,000 
12^230-183 
Contact: Assistant 
Secretary, Massachusetts 
Executive Office of 
Environmental Affairs, 100 
Cambridge Street, Boston, 
MA 02202 



Municipal Art Society 
FY 1985 
$25,000 
52-4256-0040 
Contact: President, 
Municipal Art Society, 457 
Madison Avenue, New 
York, NY 10022 



To develop a national design competition 
to generate ideas for potential uses of the 
Boston Harbor Islands. 



To develop the criteria and format for 
the Design Competition of the Boston 
Harbor Islands with special emphasis on 
energy consciousness. The competition 
guidelines, which have general relevance 
for projects in coastal areas, promote ac- 
tive and passive solar energy uses and 
the use of indigenous plant materials and 
winds to enhance energy efficiency. 



For a public education exhibit and two 
conferences to explore obstacles to com- 
prehensive waterfront planning and to 
study opportunities for reviving ferry 
transport systems. The exhibit focused 
on the past and future of ferry transport 
in the New York and New Jersey water- 
fronts, documented the misuse of hun- 
dreds of miles of waterfront and pro- 
posed design alternatives. 




A waterfront walkway along the New Jersey shoreline of the 
Hudson River integrates eight communities by linking their wa- 
terfront areas and by providing access to parks. 



90 CHAPTER TWO 



New York City 

Neighborhood Open Space 

Coalition 

FY 1987 

$25,000 

87-4251-0109 

Contact: Director, New 

York City Neighborhood 

Open Space Coalition, 72 

Reade Street, Fifth Floor, 

New York, NY 10007 



Paolini, Kenneth W. 

FY 1981 

$5,000 

11-4213-100 

Contact: lil West Newton 

Street, Apt. 5, Boston, MA 

02116 



Parks Council, Inc. 

FY 1978 

$20,000 

R8a42-190 

Contact: Project Director, 

Parks Council, Inc., 457 

Madison Avenue, New 

York, NY 10022 



Parks Council, Inc. 

FY 1986 

$20,000 

86-4231-0015 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Parks Council, Inc., 457 

Madison Avenue, New 

York. NY 10022 



Pennsylvania State 
University 
FY 1987 
$25,000 
87-4251-0163 
Contact: Director of 
Research, Pennsylvania 
State University, Main 
Campus, 201 Old Main, 
University Park, PA 



Petlrinari, James A. 

FY 1986 

$10,000 

86^213-0039 

Contact: 1 677 East 25lh 

Avenue, Eugene, OR 97403 



For a design and development plan for a 
forty-mile urban greenway, providing a 
pedestrian and bicycle trail stretching 
from the Atlantic Ocean to Long Island 
Sound. The aim was to connect Brook- 
lyn's system of parkways with parks in 
Queens, creating a much-needed buffer 
through one of the country's most 
densely populated residential areas. 



To prepare a text defining the appropri- 
ate design roles of the Office of Coastal 
Zone Management in Washington, D.C., 
and similar agencies at state levels. The 
project focused on the importance of 
managing, preserving and maintaining 
the designed and natural qualities of the 
nation's coastline. A $5,000 amendment 
to the project was made in 1982. 



To create urban waterfront parks out of 
abandoned open space through a cooper- 
ative effort on the part of architects and 
planners, community organizations and 
local businesses. 



For a planning study of streetscape and 
pedestrian systems for the West Side wa- 
terfront. The aims were to link the vari- 
ous sites under development both visually 
and conceptually and convey a sense of a 
special waterfront space. 



For a program of design research and 
communication to develop principles for 
the design of spaces where rivers meet 
small towns. The study examines typical 
design situations and corresponding de- 
sign principles as a preliminary basis for 
devising design guidelines. 



To create studies and a model for the re- 
design of the waterfront in Astoria, Ore- 
gon. The model is based on the historical 
character of the city, recommendations 
from established and new users of the 
waterfront and citizens groups. 



Providence Foundation 

FY 1983 

$27,500 

32-4230-00088 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Providence Foundation, 10 

Dorrance Street, 

Providence, Rl 02903 



Sierra Club Foundation 

FY 1981 

$15,000 

12-4230-078 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Sierra Club Foundation, 530 

Bush Street, San Francisco, 

C A 94108 



State Coastal Conservancy 

FY 1981 

$15,000 

12-4250-206 

Contact: Project Analyst, 

State Coastal Conservancy, 

1212 Broadway, Oakland, 

C A 94612 



State of California 

FY 1979 

$15,000 

92-4233-077 

Contact: Field 

Representative, State 

Coastal Conservancy, State 

Capitol Building, 

Sacramento, CA 95814 



Trust for Public Land 

FY 1986 

$20,000 

86^231-0149 

Contact: Vice-President, 

Trust for Public Land, 866 

Broadway, New York, NY 

10012 



Village of Lewiston 

FY 1979 

$13,250 

92-4233-197 

Contact: Mayor, Village of 

Lewiston, 145 North Fourth 

Street, Lewiston, NY 14092 



To prepare a design study and implemen- 
tation plan for the Providence water- 
front. Several state agencies and an ar- 
chitect collaborated in an efTort to regain 
this underutilized space for public use. 
The study is entitled The Providence 
Waterfront, 1636-2000. 



To provide design assistance to local citi- 
zen planning committees working with 
the Sierra Club and the Economic 
Development Administration on a three- 
city pilot project for urban waterfront re- 
vitalization. 



To publish The Urban Edge: Where the 
City Meets the Sea The book addresses 
such issues as competition for waterfront 
space, need for public access, waterfront 
deterioration and the potential for design 
excellence. It was published in 1985 and 
edited by Joseph E. Petrillo and Peter 
Grenell. 



To prepare a feasibility study on the res- 
toration of a degraded nine-acre ocean- 
front site suitable for a recreation and 
cultural center. 



To continue planning and implementa- 
tion efforts for a waterfront walkway 
along the New Jersey shoreline of the 
Hudson River, from the George Wash- 
ington Bridge to Bayonne. The walkway 
was planned to integrate eight communi- 
ties' underused waterfront areas by pro- 
viding pedestrian access and by linking 
parks, cultural and historic attractions. 



To prepare a site development plan for a 
riverfront park at Lewiston Landing in 
New York State. 



DESIGN FOR THE ENVIRONMENT 9 1 



Waterfront Center 
FY 1983 
S6,000 

32-425(M)0170 
Contact: President, The 
Waterfront Center, 1 536 
44th Street, N.W., 
Washington, DC 20007 



Waterfront Center 
FY 1983 
$7,000 

32-4250-00046 
Contact: President, The 
Waterfront Center, 1536 
44th Street, N.W, 
Washington, DC 20007 



Waterfront Center 
FY 1987 
$10,000 
87-4251-0064 
Contact: Codirector, The 
Waterfront Center, 1 536 
44th Street, N.W., 
Washington, DC 20007 



Wolfe, Myer 

FY 1978 

$6,500 

R81-42-20N 

Contact: University of 

Washington, Urban Design 

Program, AL-1 5, 206 

Architecture Hall, Seattle, 

WA98115 



To publish the proceedings of a confer- 
ence entitled "Urban Waterfronts 1983: 
Balancing Public/Private Interests." The 
conference addressed the need for bal- 
ancing waterfront development, environ- 
mental concerns and public access and 
advocated a public-private partnership 
approach. 



To produce a draft for a publication enti- 
tled Caution: Working Waterfront. The 
work focuses on creative design solutions 
to waterfront revitalization efforts. 



To conduct a design awards program, 
Excellence on the Waterfront, that rec- 
ognizes quality design efforts at water- 
front sites. The program calls attention 
to effective design solutions in three cate- 
gories: mixed-use, recreation and plan- 
ning. 



To create and test development proto- 
types exemplifying ways in which urban 
design may be used to enhance the natu- 
ral setting of shoreline towns. 









1(P^^ 



3 



Design for 
the Arts 



The 1918 Pantages Theatre, 
once a deteriorating movie 
house, has been restored. Now 
a center for the performing 
arts, the space has helped put 
Tacoma, Washington, on the 
theatrical-performing circuit. 



"The United States is entering a period when in terms of the 
excitement and enthusiasm of the great pubUc, we are wit- 
nessing a kind of renaissance such as we have not had before," 
wrote August Heckscher, President Kennedy's Special Con- 
sultant on the Arts, in 1962. In virtually every city, he said, 
there are plans to build an art center or create an opera group, 
plans to make that city "a center for culture and the arts." 

"Renaissance" is a strong word, and it will be up to future 
art historians to decide whether America's cultural life in the 
last decades of the twentieth century deserves to be labeled a 
re-birth. But there can be no question about the tremendous 
surge of interest in the arts, or the growth in the number of 
active arts groups or the increase in the size of the audience 
for art. In 1965, for example, about one million tickets were 
sold for dance performances, chiefly in New York City. To- 
day there are more than 16 million ticket-buyers, more than 
75 percent of them outside New York. Similarly, the audience 
for orchestral music has risen from 10 million to more than 23 
million; and attendance at museums, estimated at 22 million 
in 1965, has more than doubled. All of this activity created a 
need for more places to house the arts. 

For a while, arts groups had to "make do" with whatever 
facilities were available and performed in church basements, 
basketball courts, school auditoriums. But across the country 
community leaders, private groups and planners responded to 
the need for arts facilities to meet the growing artistic needs of 
their communities. 

From its earliest years, the Design Arts Program has ex- 
plored ways to assist communities find spaces and places for 
the arts. The emphasis has been on adapting old buildings 
rather than on constructing new ones. Adaptive reuse serves 
three purposes: fine historic buildings are saved, the arts 
housed, and downtown neighborhoods infused with new vital- 
ity. 

In the seventies the Design Arts Program urged the public 
to take a look at one particularly endangered species of ar- 
chitecture that graces nearly every community — the railroad 
station — and turn it to new uses. Today dozens of these 
sturdy, and sometimes stately, buildings house performing 
arts centers, galleries and craft shops. 

A similar program encouraging restoration of old movie 
theaters also produced far-reaching results. Acrass the coun- 



94 CHAPTER THREE 




Scenes from the artistic life of 
Walnut Creek, California: a 
scene from Neil Simon's 
"Brighton Beach Memoirs, " 
ballet class, a member of the 
Youth Orchestra and a young 
member of the drawing class. 



try, scores of dilapidated movie houses have been restored to 
their former glory and opened as performing arts centers. In 
Tacoma, Washington, the historic Pantages Theater was reno- 
vated to become the home of the Tacoma Philharmonic and 
other musical organizations; in Kansas City, a 1900 Beaux 
Art gem, the Folly, was saved from the wrecker's ball by the 
Performing Arts Foundation; in Syracuse, Loew's State The- 
atre, once under discussion for demolition, was restored and 
listed on the National Register of Historic Places. And in 
Washington, D.C., the Masonic Temple, once a seedy movie 
theater, was renovated to become the National Museum of 
Women in the Arts. By awarding grants at the beginning of 
the process for feasibility studies or design and engineering 
plans, the Design Arts Program played a part in bringing 
scores of theaters back into useful life as homes for the arts. 

Other examples of adaptive reuse abound: Theaters, con- 
cert halls, and art galleries have sprung up in an incredible 
array of structures — churches, skating rinks, banks, mills, gas 
stations, barns, post offices, armories. As Robert Campbell, 
architectural critic for the Boston Globe, noted, nearly all the 
new performing arts centers "derive a lot of their character 
from the fact that they are housed in containers originally 
meant for some entirely different purpose in another time. 
Present use and visible past jostle and, by contrast, vivify each 
other." 

A majority of the 500 grants in this chapter concern plans 
for developing quality spaces for the arts, not just in metropol- 
itan areas where the arts have always flourished, but in places 
like Colquitt County, Georgia; Fayetteville, North Carolina; 
Jackson, Mississippi; Carbondale, Illinois; Elmira, New York; 
Johnson, Tennessee; and Walnut Creek, California. 

Conferences, workshops and publications also received 
grants to communicate information about the contributions 
the arts can make to the quality of life. A conference called 
The Arts Edge: Places and Spaces for the Arts in Civic Eco- 
nomics, held in Pittsburgh in 1981, brought 400 people to- 
gether to discuss the role of the arts in urban revitalization. A 
number of noteworthy publications brought expert advice on 
building places for the arts; among them: Will It Make a 
Theater: A Guide to Finding, Renovating, Financing, Bring- 
ing Up-to-Code the Non-Traditional Performance Space, by 
the Off Off Broadway Alliance; Building for the Arts: A 
Guidebook for the Planning & Design of Cultural Facilities, 
by Brown, Fleissig and Morrish for the Western States Arts 
Foundation; and Space for Dance: An Architectural Design 
Guide by Leslie Armstrong and Roger Morgan. 

The growth of the arts has been accompanied by a parallel 
growth in cultural facilities — an estimated 1,200 new ones in 
the last two decades. These arts centers, found in all sections 
of the country and housing the wealth of America's cultural 
diversity, testify to the democratic idea that art is not the 
privilege of the few but the right of the many — a part of the 
pursuit of happiness. 



DESIGN FOR THE ARTS 95 



Cultural Planning 

Feasibility and planning studies that integrate the arts into 
community and commercial development. 



Alaska State Council on the 

Arts 

FY 1980 

$10,000 

02-4250^62 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Alaska State Council on the 

Arts, 619 Warehouse 

Avenue, Suite 220, 

Anchorage, AK 99501 



American Council for the 

Arts 

FY 1980 

$10,000 

02-4250-063 

Contact: Director, American 

Council for the Arts, 570 

Seventh Avenue, New York, 

NY 10018 



American Council for the 

Arts 

FY 1981 

$85,000 

CA 81-38 

Contact: Director, American 

Council for the Arts, 570 

Seventh Avenue, New York, 

NY 10018 



American Council for the 

Arts 

FY 1981 

$7,900 

12-4252-229 

Contact: Editor, American 

Arts and ACA Update, 

American Council for the 

Arts, 570 Seventh Avenue, 

New York, NY 10081 



American Council for the 

Arts 

FY 1982 

$24,000 

22-4250-123 

Contact: Director, American 

Council for the Arts, 570 

Seventh Avenue, New York, 

NY 10018 



To conduct workshops in cultural facili- 
ties design and programming. The goal 
was to ensure that facilities in northern 
Alaska communities achieve the highest 
quality of design and meet the long-term 
needs of the region's arts and communi- 
ties. Numerous materials documented 
the Alaskan cultural facilities project. 



To edit and distribute a paperback book 
by Wolf Von Eckardt {Live the Good 
Life!, published in 1982) on means by 
which the needs of the arts can be incor- 
porated into city and regional planning 
processes. 



To produce a traveling exhibit and a 
technical assistance program on facilities 
and settings for the arts. 



To produce a special issue of the Ameri- 
can Council for the Arts' magazine fo- 
cusing on the design arts in general and 
on the "Arts Edge" conference in par- 
ticular. 



To tour the exhibit, Built Arts, and to 
print an accompanying poster The ex- 
hibit stressed the importance of good de- 
sign in arts facilities and demonstrated 
the importance of the arts to a communi- 
ty's economic and social life. 



American Institute of 

Architects Foundation, Inc. 

FY 1977 

$17,280 

R70-42-177 

Contact: President, 

American Institute of 

Architects Foundation, Inc., 

1799 New York Avenue, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20006 



American Institute of 
Municipal Research, 
Education and Training 
FY 1982 
$12,600 
22-4250-125 
Contact: President, 
American Institute of 
Municipal Research. 
Education and Training, 
1301 Pennsylvania Avenue. 
N.W., Washington, DC 
20004 



Amoskeag Neighborhood 

Association 

FY 1980 

$30,000 

02-4230-081 

Contact: President, 

Amoskeag Neighborhood 

Association, PO. Box No. 

1, Manchester, NH 03106 



Arizona Commission on the 

Arts and Humanities 

FY 1977 

$4,825 

R70-42-48 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Arizona Commission on the 

Arts and Humanities. 6330 

North Seventh Street, 

Phoenix, AZ 85014 



Arizona Commission on the 

Arts and Humanities 

FY 1980 

$14,976 

02-4230-217 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Arizona Commission on the 

Arts and Humanities, 2024 

North Seventh Street, Suite 

201, Phoenix, AZ 85006 



To produce a conference on the planning 
of arts centers, cosponsored with the 
American Council for the Arts. The con- 
ference delineated the roles and skills of 
architects, clients and users in adaptive 
reuse and new construction of commu- 
nity arts centers. 



To produce a day-long workshop on us- 
ing the arts as a tool to promote eco- 
nomic development and local prosperity. 
The workshop was modeled after the suc- 
cessful conference "Arts Edge: Places 
and Spaces for the Arts in Civic Eco- 
nomics." 



For the Amoskeag Cultural District 
Plan. The plan's four goals were to estab- 
lish a nonprofit development corporation, 
to include artists in all aspects of the re- 
vitalization process, to create housing, 
workspace and support facilities for art- 
ists and craftsmen, and to enhance 
Amoskeag's historic character. 



For a pilot project studying theater facili- 
ties in Arizona. The aims were to stimu- 
late individual communities to recycle 
older and underutilized theater buildings 
for arts uses and to develop or expand 
arts activities best suited to the available 
facilities in each location. 



For the Central Phoenix Theater Study 
Project, a feasibility study of cultural fa- 
cility needs in downtown Phoenix, Ari- 
zona. A report explored arts needs and 
market potentials, surveyed audiences 
and inventoried needs of performing arts 
groups. 



96 CHAPTER THREE 



Anzona Commission on the 

Arts and Humanities 

FY 1981 

S 13.256 

12^230-004 

Contact: Project Director, 

Arizona Commission on the 

Arts and Humanities. 6330 

North Seventh Street. 

Phoenix. AZ 8S014 



Arizona Commission on the 

Arts and Humanities 

FY 1981 

$12,940 

12-4250-191 

Contact: Executive Director. 

Arizona Commission on the 

Arts and Humanities. 6330 

North Seventh Street. 

Phoenix. AZ 85014 



Arizona State University 

FY 1984 

$100,000 

42-4231-0154 

Contact: Director. Arizona 

Stale University. Services 

Division. Tempe. AZ 85287 



To host a design charette on the pro- 
posed municipal plans for a theater facil- 
ity as part of the revitalization of down- 
town Phoenix. Six suggested themes and 
three site recommendations were gener- 
ated from the charette. 



Arts Council of Greater 

New Orleans 

FY 1987 

$40,860 

87-4251-0040 

Contact: President. Arts 

Council of Greater New 

Orleans. World Trade 

Center. 2 Canal Street. 

Suite 936. New Orleans, 

LA 70130 



Assist. Inc. 

FY 1979 

$11,000 

92^233-173 

Contact: Project Director. 

Assist, Inc., 218 East 500 

South, Salt Lake City, UT 

84111 



City of Dallas 

FY 1978 

$17,000 

R8a42-55C 

Contact: Acting Program 

Manager. City of Dallas, 

Department of Urban 

Planning. Main and 

Harwood Streets, Dallas, 

TX 75201 



For a pilot project on the adaptive use of 
historically significant buildings for cul- 
tural purposes by Arizona communities. 
A video and report, Staging a Come- 
back, were produced. The project was 
conducted in concert with the Western 
States Arts Foundation cultural facilities 
project. 



To conduct a two-stage international 
architectural competition for a 1 50,000- 
square-foot fine arts complex to house 
the university's art collection and to con- 
tain dance and theater rehearsal areas, 
classrooms and a 500-seat theater. A vid- 
eotape and report documented the 
project. 



To develop a plan to integrate arts ven- 
tures and projects into the ongoing re- 
vitalization of downtown New Orleans's 
historic warehouse district. 



To generate studies on streetscape devel- 
opment alternatives to make use of com- 
munity anchors in the creation of a cul- 
tural district. A booklet entitled "West 
South Temple" was produced. 



For the Arts District Management 
Study, a comprehensive arts plan for 
Dallas, Texas. The plan outlined munici- 
pal policies and programs to extend the 
economic impact of the arts and devel- 
oped a coordinated approach to planning, 
construction and utilization of arts facili- 
ties' capital and operating funding. 



City of Daly City 

FY 1981 

$10,000 

12-4250-156 

Contact: Project Director. 

City of Daly City, Sullivan 

Avenue and 90th Street, 

Daly City, C A 94015 



City of Escondido 

FY 1984 

$84,930 

42-4257-0067 

Contact: City Manager. 

City of Escondido. City 

Hall. 100 Valley Boulevard. 

Escondido. CA 92025 



City of Minneapolis 

FY 1978 

$20,000 

R80-42-124N 

Contact: Director, 

Minneapolis Arts 

Commission. City of 

Minneapolis. 302 City Hall. 

Minneapolis. MN 55415 



City of Newport News 
FY 1983 
$100,000 
32^230-00187 
Contact: Director of 
Development. City of 
Newport News. Department 
of Development. 2400 
Washington Avenue. 
Newport News, VA 23607 



City of Paterson 

FY 1977 

$19,250 

R7042-78 

Contact: City of Paterson, 

Department of Community 

Development, Paterson, NJ 

07505 



City of Pittsburgh 

FY 1979 

$15,000 

92^233-194 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Urban Redevelopment 

Authority, 200 Ross Street. 

Pittsburgh, PA 15219 



For a feasibility study identifying and an- 
alyzing sites with structures appropriate 
for conversion to a performing arts cen- 
ter. 



To conduct a national two-stage urban 
design competition for a new $58 million 
civic center, to include a performing arts 
center and fine arts museum. Several re- 
ports documented the competition and 
the studies surrounding it. 



To host a national conference developing 
the concept that the arts are an impor- 
tant factor in urban development and 
stability. A report, A New Kind of Cur- 
rency: The Role of the Arts in Urban 
Economic Development, was produced. 



To host a design competition for the 
Newport News Centre Cultural Arts Pa- 
vilion. Slides and a report documented 
the competition for the building, which 
was intended to set the architectural tone 
for Newport Centre, the city's downtown 
development project. 



For a feasibility study and architectural 
plans for a museum and arts center serv- 
ing Paterson, New Jersey, and the sur- 
rounding area. A historic building, for- 
merly the Rogers Locomotive Erecting 
Shop, was identified as the site for the 
museum. 



For the Firstside Cultural District Plan, 
an urban design study of Pittsburgh's 
historic First Avenue district. The plan 
analyzed existing conditions with a view 
toward preserving the district's historic 
character and current role as home to a 
variety of arts-oriented businesses. A re- 
port was issued. 



DESIGN FOR THE ARTS 97 



City of St. Paul 

FY 1984 

$21,425 

42-4257-0021 

Contact: Mayor, City of St. 

Paul, OPED, 25 West 

Fourth Street. St. Paul, MN 

55102 



City of Walnut Creek 

FY 1977 

$15,500 

R7042-8I 

Contact: Director of City 

Arts, City of Walnut Creek, 

1444 Civic Drive, Walnut 

Creek, CA 94596 



City at 42nd Street, Inc. 

FY 1980 

$20,000 

02-4240060 

Contact: Director of Design, 

The City at 42nd Street, 

Inc., 200 Park Avenue, New 

York, NY 10017 



City of Miami 
FY 1979 
$15,000 
92-4211-238 
Contact: Director, 
Marketing and Business 
Development, Downtown 
Development Authority, 
PO. Box 330708, Miami, 
FL 33133 



Clarke, John P 

FY 1980 

$10,000 

01-4213-163 

Contact: 342 West State 

Street, Trenton, NJ 0861! 



Coe, Linda 

FY 1980 

$18,000 

CA 80-13 

Contact: 10 Dana Street, 

Apt. 311, Cambridge, MA 

02138 



To conduct an on-site charette in the 
Lowertown neighborhood to produce pro- 
posals for exhibition and performing arts 
spaces. 



For a study assessing the arts facility and 
programming needs of central Contra 
Costa County. Special emphasis was 
placed on multijurisdictional cooperation 
and adaptive use of existing facilities. 



To support design and plans for renova- 
tion and restoration of seven of New 
York City's greatest theaters. Slides and 
a 1 50-page report, The City at 42nd 
Street Urban Renewal Project, 
documented the project. 



To undertake a design and adaptive re- 
use study of the Bayfront Municipal Au- 
ditorium in downtown Miami. 



To produce a pamphlet on the economic 
and design feasibility of converting aban- 
doned school buildings into mixed-use 
community facilities housing performing 
arts centers, cultural facilities and artists' 
housing. 



To research, write and publish a direc- 
tory of federal and private funding 
sources for cultural facilities. 



Colorado Council on the 

Arts and Humanities 

FY 1985 

$22,000 

52-4231-0085 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Colorado Council on the 

Arts and Humanities, 770 

Pennsylvania Street, 

Denver, CO 80203 



Colquitt County Arts 

Council 

FY 1981 

$5,000 

12-4230-181 

Contact: Director, Colquitt 

County Arts Council, 

Colquitt County Cultural 

Center, PO. Box 1365, 

Moultrie, GA 31768 



Community Design 
Information Center 
FY 1981 
$115,000 
CA 81-37 
Contact: President, 
Community Design 
Information Center, 1346 
Connecticut Avenue, N.W., 
Suite 1009, Washington, 
DC 20036 



Cooperative Arts Council of 

Clark County 

FY 1978 

$15,000 

R8042-4 

Contact: President, 

Cooperative Arts Council of 

Clark County, RO. Box 

1995, Vancouver, WA 

98663 



Core Area Development 

District 

FY 1979 

$5,000 

92-4211-013 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Core Area Development 

District, 301 Camp Street, 

New Orleans. LA 70130 



Council for International 

Urban Liaison 

FY 1982 

$15,000 

22-4250-132 

Contact: President, Council 

for International Urban 

Liai.son, 818 I8lh Street, 

N.W.. Suite 840, 

Washington, DC 20006 



To conduct a feasibility study for the 
renovation of the Colorado State Mu- 
seum, listed on the National Register of 
Historic Places. The study sought to de- 
termine whether the Public Buildings 
Cooperative Use Act (under which the 
Old Post Office in Washington, D.C., 
was saved) could be applied on the state 
level. 



To formulate programming for the 
Colquitt County Cultural Center. Sev- 
eral feasibility studies were conducted in 
order to identify the facility that would 
best suit the cultural program. 



For graphic design and printed materials, 
conference recording, audiovisual sup- 
port and public affairs services for "Arts 
Edge: Places and Spaces for the Arts in 
Civic Economics," a conference held in 
Pittsburgh in October 1981. 



To plan a cultural and conference center 
for Vancouver, Washington. A facilities 
study and economic impact assessment 
were produced. 



To design a portable performing and ex- 
hibit structure for Lafayette Square, the 
site of daytime performance activities 
sponsored by the Core Area Develop- 
ment District, a special tax district cre- 
ated for the improvement of the New 
Orleans central business district. 



To publish the monthly flyer Urban In- 
novation Abroad, focusing on overseas 
urban livability design and planning. 
Topics covered included cultural plan- 
ning, adaptive reuse amenities, animation 
of streets and the uses of public art in 
public spaces. 



98 CHAPTER THREE 



Council for the Arts of 

Hemdon 

FY 1987 

$15,000 

87-4251-0104 

Contact: President, Council 

for the Arts of Herndon, 

720 Lynn Street. Hemdon, 

VA 22070 



Cultural Assistance Center, 
Inc. 

FY 1981 
$15,000 
12-4221-235 

Contact: Executive Vice- 
President, Cultural 
Assistance Center, 320 
West 42nd Street, New 
York, NY 10036 



Cultural Council 

Foundation 

FY 1979 

$17,500 

92-4233-084 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Cultural Council 

Foundation, 175 Fifth 

Avenue, New York, NY 

10010 



Curtis, Cathy 

FY 1982 

$4,000 

21-4213-169 

Contact: Writer, Citywest 

Magazine, 2217 Dwight 

Way, Apt. 2, Berkeley, CA 

94704 



East Tennessee Arts 

Pavilion, Inc. 

FY 1982 

$15,000 

22-4230-117 

Contact: Chairman, Board 

of Directors, East Tennessee 

Arts Pavilion, Inc., First 

Tennessee Bank Building, 

Suite 600, Knoxville, TN 

37902 



Educational Facilities 

Laboratories, Inc. 

FY 1981 

$46,516 

CA8M3 

Contact: Director, 

Educational Facilities 

Laboratories. Inc., 680 Fifth 

Avenue. New York. NY 

10018 



To develop a town-wide design to link 
the new with the old, capture the charac- 
ter of Herndon, Virginia, and provide 
opportunities for arts activities. 



To conduct a cultural facilities inventory 
of existing performance, exhibition and 
rehearsal spaces in New York City and 
to computerize, map and publish this in- 
formation. Photographs and an extensive 
report documented the project. 



For the planning stage of a survey of nat- 
ural and cultural resources in New York 
City. The purpose of the survey was to 
assess the value of these resources in 
terms of the nation's heritage. 



To publicize the Western States Arts 
Foundation's Arts Facility Planning 
Handbook to design and non-design pro- 
fessionals involved in cultural planning. 
Two articles, "Museum Decision Mak- 
ing" and "Museums on the Move: Cre- 
ative Alternatives in Real Estate," were 
produced as well as other materials. 



To produce a design for the adaptive re- 
use of the United States Pavilion, con- 
structed for the 1982 World's Fair in 
Knoxville, Tennessee. A packet of ma- 
terials entitled the East Tennessee Arts 
Pavilion documented the project. 



To produce a publication on arts in sur- 
plus schools and additional publications 
for the "Arts Edge" conference, held in 
Pittsburgh in October 1981. 



Educational Facilities 

Laboratories, Inc. 

FY 1981 

$20,000 

12-4230-058 

Contact: Project Director. 

Educational Facilities 

Laboratories. Inc.. 680 Fifth 

Avenue, New York, NY 

10019 



Exploring the Metropolis, 

Inc. 

FY 1985 

$7,000 

52-4231-0073 

Contact: Chairman. 

Exploring the Metropolis. 

Inc.. 10 Grace Square, New 

York, NY 10028 



Federated Arts Council of 

Richmond 

FY 1982 

$25,000 

22-4230-006 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Federated Arts Council of 

Richmond, 5 North Sixth 

Street, Richmond, VA 

23219 



Festival Theater of 

California, Inc. 

FY 1978 

$5,000 

R8O42-70 

Contact: President, Festival 

Theater of California, Inc., 

25840 Elinore Place, 

Carmel, CA 93923 



Fine Arts Council of 

Fayetteville 

FY 1979 

$14,825 

92^211-216 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Fine Arts Council of 

Fayetteville PO. Box 318, 

Fayetteville, NC 28302 



Fleissig, William B. 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

91-4232-160 

Contact: 1 1 8 Oxford Street, 

Cambridge, MA 02140 



To develop a technical assistance kit 
based on concepts of sequential, locally 
managed, participatory planning. These 
processes were field tested in three small 
arts organizations, and five hundred kits 
of self-help materials were produced. 



For evaluations of two proposals for 
Broadway. The report concluded that ex- 
tending receiving sites for theaters' un- 
used air rights would not achieve goals 
and that further economic data was re- 
quired. 



To employ a consultant team to develop 
urban design guidelines and a plan for 
the adaptive reuse of structures within a 
defined arts district. A video 
documented the project. 



To assess the feasibility of building a ma- 
jor theater facility in Monterey County, 
California, through site evaluation, anal- 
ysis of potential funding sources and 
marketing studies. An extensive report 
documented the project. 



To study the feasibility of establishing a 
central cultural arts facility in downtown 
Fayetteville, North Carolina, and to seek 
maximum citizen participation in the 
process. Several reports were issued. 



To study and survey sample communities 
that have undergone an arts district evo- 
lution. 



DESIGN FOR THE ARTS 99 



Fort Mason Foundation 

FY 1980 

$17,500 

02-4230078 

Contact: Business Manager, 

Building A, Fort Mason, 

San Francisco, CA 94123 



Friends of the San 

Francisco Art Commission 

FY 1987 

$30,000 

87-4251-0164 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Friends of the San 

Francisco Art Commission, 

100 Bush Street, Room 610, 

San Francisco, CA 94104 



Illinois Arts Council 

FY 1987 

$35,500 

87-4251-0170 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Illinois Arts Council, State 

of Illinois Center, 100 West 

Randolph, Chicago, IL 

60601 



Institute for Urban Design 

FY 1983 

$25,000 

32-425000109 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Institute for Urban Design, 

Main PO. Box 105. 

Purchase, NY 10577 



Institute for Urban Design 

FY 1983 

$20,000 

32-4230-00082 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Institute for Urban Design, 

Main PO. Box 105, 

Purchase, NY 10577 



International Council on 

Monuments and Sites 

(ICOMOS) 

FY 1982 

$4,825 

22-4250-054 

Contact: Chairman, 

ICOMOS, 1785 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

N.W.. Washington, DC 

20036 



To refine the final master plan for the 
transformation of 300,000 square feet of 
military warehouses into cultural facili- 
ties. 



To develop an arts policy plan to incorpo- 
rate into San Francisco's master plan. 
The aims were to quantify the needs of 
the city's artists and arts consumers and 
to create a framework for San Francisco 
to respond to arts-related issues and 
problems. 



To present eight regional workshops to 
educate cities and counties on design re- 
quirements for new or renovated cultural 
facilities. Each workshop included teams 
of experts in theater, museum, acoustics, 
lighting and climate control, exhibit and 
graphic design. 



To support the research phase of City 
Building, a project to collect and dissemi- 
nate information on the inclusion of the 
arts in large-scale mixed-use commercial 
development projects. A handbook. Cul- 
tural Facilities in Mixed-Use Develop- 
ment, was published. 



To support the Cleveland Civic Design 
Charette, a three-day session to develop 
proposals for transforming an unused in- 
dustrial area in the Cleveland Flats into 
a cultural arts district. The results ap- 
peared in Urban Design International 
magazine. 



To develop the United States member- 
ship of the International Council on 
Monuments and Sites, an international 
organization that promotes the study and 
conservation of cultural resources. As 
part of the project, newsletters and in- 
formational brochures were produced. 



Jackson Arts Alliance 

FY 1980 

$7,500 

02-4230-092 

Contact: Executive Director. 

Jackson Arts Alliance, PO. 

Box 288, Jackson, MS 

39205 



Jackson Arts Alliance . 

FY 1984 

$25,000 

42-4231-0024 

Contact: President, Jackson 

Arts Alliance, PO. Box 288, 

Jackson, MS 39205 



Jacobson, Dorothy R. 

FY 1982 

$10,000 

21-4213-176 

Contact: Associate Director, 

Partners for Livable Places, 

622 Independence Avenue, 

S.E., Washington. DC 

20003 



Jersey City Economic 

Development Corporation 

FY 1986 

$10,000 

86-4231-0005 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Jersey City Economic 

Development Corporation, 

870 Bergen Avenue, Jersey 

City. NJ 07306 



Keller, Genevieve P 

FY 1981 

$8,500 

11-4213-227 

Contact: 1410 Holly Road. 

Charlottesville. VA 22901 



Landmarks Preservation 

Council of Illinois 

FY 1980 

$20,000 

02-4230072 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Landmarks Preservation 

Council of Illinois, 407 

South Dearborn Street, 

Chicago, I L 60605 



To conduct a design feasibility study to 
adapt a privately owned building built in 
1904 to suit the requirements of several 
nonprofit and for-profit arts concerns in 
Jackson, Mississippi. Two reports were 
published. 



For a plan to incorporate arts activities 
and facilities into a major downtown 
mixed-use development project in Jack- 
son, Mississippi. A report. Public Spaces 
and Places for Arts, documented the 
plan and gave special emphasis to the 
needs of performing groups. 



To apply concepts from the "Arts Edge" 
conference to the needs of small towns 
lacking effective cultural planning. Plans 
for facility use and reuse, district plan- 
ning and design and techniques of co- 
operative administration were among the 
approaches proposed. 



To conduct a feasibility study for adap- 
tive reuse of Loew's Jersey Theater. The 
study report concluded that restoration 
as a cultural facility was feasible if com- 
patible commercial uses were developed 
and operating expenses subsidized. A 
video was also produced. 



To develop appropriate strategies to aid 
small towns and cities in rural regions in 
cultural facility and district planning, 
downtown revitalization and historic 
preservation. 



To undertake design and planning stud- 
ies in an attempt to gain historic land- 
mark status for three adjacent theaters 
slated for demolition. A report entitled 
The North Loop Theater Study: A Per- 
forming Arts Center for Chicago was 
produced. 



100 CHAPTER THREE 



Massachusetts Council on 
the Arts and Humanities 
FY 1981 
$20,000 
12^221-247 
Contact: Chairman. 
Massachusetts Council on 
the Arts and Humanities, 
One Ashburton Place, 
Boston. MA 02108 



Milwaukee Repertory 
Theater, Inc. 
FY 1981 
$20,000 
12-4230-069 
Contact: Managing 
Director, Milwaukee 
Repertory Theater, Inc., 
929 North Water Street, 
Milwaukee, WI 53202 



McGraw, Karen 

FY 1982 

$5,000 

21-4213-178 

Contact: 902 East Fifth, 

Suite 204, Austin, TX 

78702 



National Conference of 

State Legislatures 

FY 1982 

$36,000 

22-4250-143 

Contact: Manager, Arts and 

States Program, National 

Conference of State 

Legislatures, 1125 17th 

Street, Suite 1 500, Denver, 

CO 80202 



New England Foundation 

for the Arts 

FY 1984 

$25,750 

42-4256-00005 

Contact: Acting Executive 

Director, New England 

Foundation for the Arts, 25 

Mount Auburn Street, 

Cambridge, MA 02138 



New York Foundation for 

the Arts 

FY 1979 

$57,380 

92^212-153 

Contact: New York 

Foundation for the Arts, 60 

East 42nd Street, Suite 940, 

New York, NY 10017 



To undertake a three-part project for cul- 
tural facilities development. The project 
built on recent work in design and eval- 
uation and provided assistance to orga- 
nizations and communities. 



To assess the potential impact of a build- 
ing program on the total operations of a 
theater company and to formulate guide- 
lines and strategies for growth consistent 
with artistic standards. Several reports 
documented the project. 



To involve local artists in Austin's plan- 
ning and development. The aim was to 
avert the displacement of artists that of- 
ten accompanies downtown revitalization. 
A report studied similar efforts in Min- 
neapolis and other cities and surveyed 
the needs of local artists. 



For a program promoting and publicizing 
the role state legislators can play in 
stimulating the development of cultural 
facilities and artists' spaces. A confer- 
ence was held and two reports were is- 
sued. 



To continue development of a regional 
information center and a computerized 
database on arts facilities. The informa- 
tion was distributed throughout New 
England in a two-volume directory which 
covers traditional as well as nontra- 
ditional spaces. 



To produce a film on the design of cul- 
tural institutions, focusing on France's 
new cultural center, Beaubourg. A 
$20,000 amendment, grant number 02- 
4250-901.1, was made in 1980 as well as 
a $10,000 amendment, 12-4250-9005.1. 



New York Shakespeare 

Festival 

FY 1983 

$15,000 

32^230-00068 

Contact: General Manager, 

New York Shakespeare 

Festival, 425 Lafayette 

Street, New York, NY 

10003 



New York State Council on 

the Arts 

FY 1978 

$5,000 

R80-42-186C 

Contact: Director, 

Architecture Program, New 

York State Council on the 

Arts, 80 Centre Street, New 

York, NY 10013 



New York State Council on 

the Arts 

FY 1978 

$5,250 

R80-42-61 

Contact: Program Assistant, 

New York State Council on 

the Arts, 80 Centre Street, 

New York, NY 10013 



North Carolina State 

University 

FY 1982 

$11,000 

22^250-149 

Contact: Professor of 

Architecture, North 

Carolina State University, 

School of Design, PO. Box 

5398, Raleigh, NC 27650 



Partners for Livable Places 

FY 1980 

$3,200 

02-4250-135 

Contact: President, Partners 

for Livable Places, 2120 P 

Street, N.W., Washington, 

DC 20037 



Partners for Livable Places 

FY 1980 

$20,000 

02^221-208 

Contact: Associate Director, 

Partners for Livable Places, 

2120 P Street, N.W., 

Washington, DC 20037 



For an urban design and zoning study of 
Manhattan's theater district. The aims 
were to formulate design guidelines and 
development strategies that encourage 
new development while preserving the 
historic traditions of the district. 



For a study and report on cultural facili- 
ties in New York State. 



To continue a statewide program of tech- 
nical architectural assistance to nonprofit 
organizations. The aim was to aid in re- 
solving immediate problems confronting 
organizations. 



To develop a program of community de- 
sign participation in the planning of arts 
facilities throughout North Carolina. The 
project involved a collaboration of the 
state arts council and the university. A 
reference tool, the Art Center Work- 
book, and a videotape were produced. 



For a research and public awareness pro- 
gram stemming from the conference 
"The Arts and City Planning: Making 
Cities Livable," held in San Antonio in 
December 1 979. A consortium of na- 
tional organizations outlined a position 
paper on cultural planning activities and 
on possible areas for future cooperation. 



To conduct The Economics of Amenity, 
a program seeking to relate design qual- 
ity, performing arts, visual arts and qual- 
ity-of-life issues to local economic devel- 
opment strategies. A national 
demonstration program and public edu- 
cation campaign were launched as part 
of the program. A $20,000 amendment, 
grant number 12-4221-9007.1, was made 
in 1981. 



DESIGN FOR THE ARTS 101 



Pittsburgh Foundation 
FY 1981 
$15,000 
12-4250-274 
Contact: Director, 
Pittsburgh Foundation, 301 
Fifth Avenue, Suite 1417, 
Pittsburgh, PA 15222 



President and Fellows of 
Harvard College 
FY 1981 
S20,000 
124221-236 
Contact: Director, 
Community Assistance 
Program, Harvard 
University, 1350 
Massachusetts Avenue, 
Cambridge, MA 02163 



Rediger, Shirley G. 

FY 1982 

$10,000 

21-4213-105 

Contact: State Coordinator, 

Cultural Facilities 

Committee, 326 Fourth 

Street, Suite 211, Juneau, 

AK 99801 



To involve local arts groups, design stu- 
dents and volunteer staff in the prepara- 
tion for the "Arts Edge" conference, 
held in Pittsburgh in October 1981. 



Richmond Renaissance, Inc. 

FY 1983 

$17,070 

32-4230-00080 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Richmond Renaissance, 

Inc., 600 East Broad Street, 

Suite 960, Richmond, VA 

23219 



San Antonio Arts Council 

FY 1978 

$20,000 

R8(M2-78 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Arts Council of San 

Antonio, 235 East 

Commerce Street, San 

Antonio, TX 78205 



San Francisco 

Redevelopment Agency 

FY 1981 

$17,000 

12-4230-174 

Contact: Project Director, 

San Francisco 

Redevelopment Agency, 

939 Ellis Street. San 

Francisco, CA 94109 



To provide technical assistance to New 
England communities concerning the 
development of cultural facilities and en- 
hancement of community arts activities. 
Students prepared individualized facility 
guidelines for each participating commu- 
nity. An amendment, grant number 21- 
4213-9100.1, was made in 1982. 



To develop a cultural facilities preplan- 
ning and program model for rural com- 
munities. The model drew in part from 
examples of facilities built by and/or for 
Native Americans and other groups as a 
means of preserving their cultures. Two 
reports examined public policy, manage- 
ment, operating plans and arts program- 
ming. 



To create a design program for a new 
museum and district-wide management 
plans integrating the museum's activities 
into a proposed development project in 
downtown Richmond. A brief report was 
issued. 



To conduct design and feasibility studies 
concerning the establishment of a per- 
forming arts district in downtown San 
Antonio, Texas. The study report evalu- 
ated the demand for performing arts fa- 
cilities, the types of facilities needed, re- 
use potentials of existing theaters and 
technical requirements of new structures. 



To plan a cultural district (a mixed-use 
development in downtown San Fran- 
cisco) to contain commercial, recre- 
ational, amusement and cultural facili- 
ties, housing and hotels. Photographs and 
a report documented the plan. 



Shapiro, Carol B. 
FY 1983 
$9,000 

31-4213-00016 
Contact: 2800 Quebec 
Street, N.W., Apt. 653, 
Washington, DC 20008 



Spoleto Festival, USA 

FY 1981 

$30,000 

12-4230-190 

Contact: Business Manager, 

Spoleto Festival, USA, PO. 

Box 1 57, Charleston, SC 

29402 



St. Louis County 

Department of Parks and 

Recreation 

FY 1978 

$7,500 

R80-42-13 

Contact: Historic 

Supervisor, St. Louis 

County Department of 

Parks and Recreation, 7900 

Forsyth, Clayton, MO 

63105 



Town of Carbondale 

FY 1979 

$2,500 

92-4211-033 

Contact: Town Manager, 

Town of Carbondale, 76 

South Second, Carbondale, 

CO 81623 



U.S. Conference of Mayors 
FY 1983 
$100,000 
DCA 83-5 
Contact: Project 
Coordinator, U.S. 
Conference of Mayors, 1620 
1 Street, N.W., Washington, 
DC 20006 



U.S. Conference of Mayors 

Research and Education 

Foundation 

FY 1984 

$29,040 

42-4255-0079 

Contact: U.S. Conference of 

Mayors Research and 

Education Foundation, 1620 

1 Street, Washington, DC 

20006 



To examine the roles of arts facilities 
and arts districts in downtown revitaliza- 
tion — investments through which many 
cities have injected new life into deterio- 
rating areas. 



To conduct a design competition to gen- 
erate new ideas for an arts block in 
Charleston's central business district. 
Central concerns of the competition were 
the space and economics of the historic 
Gloria Theater and several other build- 
ings. A report documented the project. 



To undertake a feasibility study address- 
ing the need for a historic and cultural 
facility in northwest St. Louis County, 
Missouri, including assessment of costs, 
users and appropriateness of a particular 
historic site. 



To conduct the Carbondale Cultural 
Center Study. The study found that the 
level of involvement in cultural activities 
in Carbondale, Colorado, calls for a 
greater number of modern, efficient and 
functional spaces. 



For a publication to encourage the na- 
tion's mayors to support local arts activ- 
ity through such techniques as revolving 
funds, tax abatement, sale and lease-back 
agreements, increment financing, sales 
taxes, hotel taxes and special purpose 
bonds. 



To publish a book on methods and tech- 
niques of urban arts financing. The book 
was published in 1988 and distributed to 
mayors and other city decision-makers. 



102 CHAPTER THREE 



Urban Innovations Group 

FY 1977 

$35,000 

R70-42-184 

Contact: Chairman of the 

Board. Urban Innovations 

Group, 1063 Gayley 

Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 

90024 



Urban Innovations Group 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

92^235-137 

Contact: Urban Innovations 

Group, 1063 Gayley 

Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 

90024 



Urban Land Institute 
FY 1984 
$25,250 
42^255-0059 
Contact: Executive Vice- 
President, Urban Land 
Institute, 1090 Vermont 
Avenue, N.W., Washington, 
DC 20005 



West Virginia Arts and 

Humanities Commission 

FY 1978 

$30,000 

R8042-146 

Contact: Grants 

Coordinator, West Virginia 

Arts and Humanities 

Commission, Capitol 

Complex, Charleston, WV 

25305 



Western States Art 

Foundation 

FY 1981 

$119,000 

CA 81-17 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Western States Arts 

Foundation, 141 East Palace 

Avenue, Santa Fe, NM 

87501 



Western States Art 

Foundation 

FY 1982 

$10,000 

22^250-071 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Western States Art 

Foundation, 141 East Palace 

Avenue, Santa Fe, NM 

87501 



To investigate the contributions of arts 
and culture to the economies of large cit- 
ies. A two-phase project was conducted 
using Los Angeles as case study. The 
study resulted in a book entitled The 
Arts in (he Economic Life of the City, 
published by the American Council for 
the Arts in 1979. 



To edit and publish The Arts in the Eco- 
nomic Life of the City, a book examining 
the direct and indirect contributions 
made by cultural activities to the eco- 
nomic development of large central cit- 
ies. 



For Cultural Facilities in Mixed-Use 
Development, a book that examines 
guidelines for the design and planning of 
arts facilities in mixed-use projects and 
arts districts. The book was written by 
Harold Snedcof and published in 1985. 



To aid West Virginia communities in 
adapting older buildings for arts pro- 
gramming. Several design and feasibility 
studies of selected school buildings, the- 
aters and public buildings were con- 
ducted and reports published. 



To work with the Federal/State Partner- 
ship Program to assist communities and 
states in developing cultural facilities. 
The project included a survey on cultural 
facilities issues confronting western 
states, an inventory of existing facilities 
and research for a cultural facilities 
handbook. 



To design and print Building for the 
Arts: A Guidebook for the Planning and 
Design of Cultural Facilities. The book 
is a technical assistance handbook that 
covers feasibility studies, site selection, 
financing, management and community 
and government support. It was pub- 
lished in 1984. 



Western Stales Art 

Foundation 

FY 1982 

$21,000 

22-4230-218 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Western States Art 

Foundation, 141 East Palace 

Avenue, Santa Fe, NM 

87501 



To administer technical assistance to 
communities within the Western States 
Art Foundation region. 



Performing Arts 

Competitions and studies for new facilities and planning for 
renovation or conversion of existing structures for dance, 
music, opera and theater. 



Alliance of Resident 

Theaters 

FY 1987 

$20,000 

87-4251-0158 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Alliance of Resident 

Theaters, 325 Spring Street, 

Room 315, New York, NY 

10013 



American Conservancy 

Theater Foundation 

FY 1978 

$15,000 

R80^2-65 

Contact: General Director, 

American Conservancy 

Theater Foundation, 450 

Geary Street, San 

Francisco, CA 94102 



American Dance Festival 
FY 1982 
$30,000 
22-4230-190 
Contact: President, 
American Dance Festival, 
RO. Box 6097, College 
Station, Durham, NC 27708 



Arts Assembly of 

Jacksonville, Inc. 

FY 1982 

$25,000 

22-4230-191 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Arts Assembly of 

Jacksonville, Inc., 632 May 

Street, Jacksonville, FL 

32204 



To update and expand the book. Will It 
Make a Theater? A Guide to Finding, 
Financing and Bringing-up-to-Code the 
Nontraditional Performance Space, 
which has gone through three printings. 



To design backstage facilities and im- 
prove acoustics and lighting for the ren- 
ovation and preservation of the historic 
Geary Theater in San Francisco. A 208- 
page design study documented the 
project. 



For a building program, concept 
drawings and schematic designs for a 
permanent home for the American 
Dance Festival and its related activities. 



To plan the restoration of a 1927 movie 
palace, the Florida Theater, as a per- 
forming arts facility. The aim was to cre- 
ate both a multipurpose hall and a ban- 
ner project for downtown revitalization in 
Jacksonville, Florida. A report on the 
renovation was produced. 



DESIGN FOR THE ARTS 103 



Asolo Opera Guild, Inc. 

FY 1981 

$20,000 

12-4230^10 

Contact: Vice-President, 

Asolo Opera Guild, Inc., 

RO. Box 638, Sarasota, FL 

33578 



Bangor Symphony 

Orchestra 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

92-4211-002 

Contact: President, Bangor 

Symphony Orchestra, RO. 

Box 1441, Bangor, ME 

04401 



Bardavon 1 869 Opera 

House, Inc. 

FY 1981 

$17,920 

12-4230-014 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Bardavon 1 869 Opera 

House, Inc. 35 Market 

Street, Poughkeepsie, NY 

12601 



Bardavon 1 869 Opera 

House, Inc. 

FY 1982 

$20,000 

22-4230020 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Bardavon 1 869 Opera 

House, Inc., 35 Market 

Street, Poughkeepsie, NY 

12601 



Barter Foundation. Inc. 
FY 1979 
$6,620 
92-4211-003 
Contact: Producing 
Director, The Barter 
Foundation, Inc., Barter 
Drive. Abingdon, VA 24210 



Bealc Street Repertory 

Company, Inc. 

FY 1978 

$6,820 

R80-42-134 

Contact: Director, Beale 

Street Repertory Company, 

Inc., 1957 Poplar Street, 

Memphis, TN 38104 



For a design competition for the renova- 
tion of a theater in downtown Sarasota 
for use by the Asolo Opera and other 
performing arts organizations. Each of 
the competing design teams included two 
students from the Ringling School of 
Art. 



To explore the possibility of restoring the 
Bangor Opera House (used as a movie 
theater) to its original purpose as a facil- 
ity for performances of all types. The op- 
era house was originally built in 1882 
and was rebuilt in 1922 after a disastrous 
fire. A reuse study was prepared. 



To prepare a historic structures report 
and architectural plans for the restora- 
tion and renovation of the 1 1 1 -year-old 
Collingwood Opera House. The building 
is listed on the National Register of His- 
toric Places. 



To prepare for the second and third 
phases of the renovation of the Bardavon 
1 869 Opera House through studies, plan- 
ning and design consultation. 



For research and design development for 
the preservation and adaptation of a his- 
toric church (circa 1830) as a small the- 
ater. This National Register property is 
known as the Barter Playhouse and has 
been used as a theater since 1 962. 



To prepare a feasibility study and design 
concept for the restoration and adaptive 
reuse of the Daisy Theater in the Beale 
Street historic district as a performing 
arts facility. A report on the project was 
produced. 



Beyond Baroque Foundation 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

92-4211-004 

Contact: President, Beyond 

Baroque Foundation, 1639 

West Washington 

Boulevard, Venice, CA 

90291 



Black Economic Union of 

Greater Kansas City, Inc. 

FY 1978 

$13,000 

R80-42-76 

Contact: Black Economic 

Union of Greater Kansas 

City, Inc., 2502 Prospect, 

Kansas City, MO 64127 



Blair County Arts 

Foundation 

FY 1977 

$8,960 

R70-42-69 

Contact: Project Director, 

Blair County Arts 

Foundation, 1208 12th 

Avenue, Altoona, PA 16601 



Capital Area Association for 

the Performing Arts 

FY 1977 

$20,000 

R70-42-75 

Contact: Project Director, 

Capital Area Association for 

the Performing Arts, RO. 

Box 2403, Olympia, WA 

98507 



Carnegie Hall Society, Inc. 
FY 1980 
$15,000 
02-4230-213 
Contact: Director of 
Planning and Development, 
Carnegie Hall Society, 881 
Seventh Avenue, New York, 
NY 10019 



Carnegie Hall Society, Inc. 
FY 1981 
$15,000 
1 2-4230-047 
Contact: Director of 
Planning and Development, 
Carnegie Hall Society, 881 
Seventh Avenue, New York, 
NY 10019 



To plan and design the rehabilitation of 
the Old Westminster School Auditorium 
into a New Center for the Creative Arts, 
a facility to house Beyond Baroque's pro- 
gram of education and presentation of 
the literary, visual, musical and theatri- 
cal arts. 



To study the possibility of rehabilitating 
an armory building for a performing arts 
center. The center would be located in 
the 18th and Vine area, which has an in- 
ternationally recognized reputation in the 
realm of jazz. 



For architectural and design studies for 
the Mishler Theater. The aim was to re- 
store the theater as a year-round perfor- 
mance facility. 



For design and planning for the proposed 
Washington Center for the Performing 
Arts on a fifteen-acre site in Olympia, 
Washington. 



To design the new lobby for Carnegie 
Hall as part of a larger master plan for 
restoration and renovation of the build- 
ing. 



To develop a master plan for a major 
renovation of Carnegie Hall and explore 
possibilities for controlled development 
of an adjacent lot in order to enhance 
Carnegie Hall's functions, services and 
financial stability. 



104 CHAPTER THREE 



Carnegie Hall Society 

FY 1982 

$15,000 

22-4230-195 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Carnegie Hall Society, 881 

Seventh Avenue, New York, 

NY 10019 



Center for Partnerships in 
Resource Development 
FY 1979 
$30,000 
92-4212-258 
Contact: Center for 
Partnerships in Resource 
Development, 1717 N 
Street, N.W., Washington, 
DC 20036 



Centralia Cultural Society 

FY 1987 

$14,951 

87-4251-0069 

Contact: President, 

Centralia Cultural Society, 

PO. Box 220, 1250 East 

Rexford, Centralia, IL 

62801 



Chelsea Theater Center 
FY 1978 
$17,000 
R8a42-118 
Contact: Project 
Coordinator, Chelsea 
Theater Center, c/o 
Brooklyn Academy of 
Music, 30 Lafayette 
Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 
11217 



Chemung County 

Performing Arts 

FY 1978 

$13,500 

R8a42-1 

Contact: President, 

Chemung County 

Performing Arts, PO. Box 

728, Elmira, NY 14902 



City of Johnson City 
FY 1981 
$25,000 
12-4230-162 
Contact: Director of 
Planning, City of Johnson 
City, PO. Box 2 1 50, 
Johnson City. TN 37601 



For technical design assistance in acous- 
tics, historic preservation and media 
technology during the design develop- 
ment stage of Carnegie Hall's renovation 
and restoration program. A brief tech- 
nical report was prepared. 



For an investigation and analysis of the 
role of movie theaters in community re- 
vitalization. A report, Theaters as Re- 
sources, developed guidelines and pro- 
vided information on techniques, 
problems and potentials of theater re- 
vitalization. 



To conduct a design feasibility study for 
the renovation of the Grand Theater in 
downtown Centralia, Illinois, as a per- 
forming arts center. The theater was con- 
structed in 1 900 as the Pittenger Grand 
Opera House, a 1,200-seat live-perfor- 
mance theater. 



To investigate the feasibility of relocat- 
ing the Chelsea Theater Center to the 
Westside Airlines terminal building in 
Manhattan. 



For technical and development assistance 
for the Samuel Langhorne Clemens Per- 
forming Arts Center, including stage de- 
sign, fund-raising, public relations and 
audience development. 



For feasibility studies and design devel- 
opment for a performing arts center for 
Johnson, Tennessee. The aim was to pro- 
vide space for the Johnson City Sym- 
phony Youth Orchestra, Intercity Ballet 
and Chorale, School for Dramatic Arts 
and Music and others. A report was is- 
sued. 



City of Pensacola 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R80-42-3 

Contact: Project Director, 

City of Pensacola, 212 West 

Government Street, 

Pensacola, FL 32501 



City of Riverside 

FY 1985 

$30,000 

52-4231-0030 

Contact: Mayor, City of 

Riverside, 3900 Main 

Street, Riverside, CA 92522 



City of Sioux City 

FY 1977 

$20,000 

R70-42-80 

Contact: Auditorium 

Manager, City of Sioux 

City, Sioux City, lA 51102 



City of Somerville 

FY 1982 

$10,000 

22-4230-211 

Contact: Assistant Director 

of Community 

Development, City of 

Somerville, Department of 

Planning and Community 

Development, 93 Highland 

Avenue, Somerville, MA 

02143 



City of Tacoma 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

92-4211-011 

Contact: City of Tacoma, 

Community Development 

Department, 740 Saint 

Helens, Tenth Floor, 

Tacoma, WA 98402 



City of Texarkana 

FY 1978 

$15,000 

R8(M2-67 

Contact: City of Texarkana, 

PO. Box 1957, Texarkana, 

TX 75501 



City of Woodstock 

FY 1979 

$2,425 

92-4211-231 

Contact: Director, City of 

Woodstock, PO. Box 190, 

Woodstock, IL 60098 



To design the stage area of the Saenger 
Theater, including lighting, orchestra pit, 
dressing rooms and storage. A videotape 
on the project was produced. 



To develop a restoration plan for the 
late- 1920s Riverside Municipal Audito- 
rium, designed by Arthur B. Benton, for 
use by local opera, symphony and dance 
organizations. The building is listed on 
the National Register of Historic Places. 



To conduct a feasibility study and to de- 
velop design plans for the conversion of 
the Municipal Auditorium in Sioux City, 
Iowa, into a performing arts facility. 
Three reports on were issued. 



To conduct a design feasibility study for 
the restoration and adaptive reuse of the 
Somerville Theater as a community per- 
forming arts center. A 200-page report 
on the study was produced. 



To plan and design the conversion of the 
landmark Pantages Theater and the 
Illington Hotel into the Pantages Center 
for the Performing Arts for the southern 
Puget Sound region. A 25-page report 
documented the project. 



To provide design services to restore the 
historic Paramount Theater as a per- 
forming arts center for the twin cities of 
Texarkana, Arkansas, and Texarkana, 
Texas. 



For the architectural and landscape de- 
sign components of the exterior restora- 
tion of the Woodstock Opera House. 
Blueprints and a renovation report were 
prepared. 



DESIGN FOR THE ARTS 105 



City of York 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R80-42-68 

Contact: Cultural Affairs 

Coordinator, City of York, 

50 West King Street. York, 

PA 17405 



Clark Center for the 

Performing Arts, Inc. 

FY 1980 

$15,000 

02-4230088 

Contact: Director, Clark 

Center for the Performing 

Arts, Inc., 939 Eighth 

Avenue, New York, NY 

10019 



Colorado Chautauqua 

Association 

FY 1982 

$7,560 

22-4230-004 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Colorado Chautauqua 

Association, Chautauqua 

Park, Boulder, CO 80302 



Columbus Association for 
the Performing Arts 
FY 1981 
$15,000 
12-4230051 
Contact: Director, 
Buildings, Restoration and 
Grants, Columbus 
Association for the 
Performing Arts, 29 East 
State Street, Columbus, OH 
43221 



Cresson Lake Playhouse 

FY 1979 

$1,000 

92-1211-014 

Contact: President, Cresson 

Lake Playhouse, Campbell 

Avenue. Spangler, PA 

15775 



Cultural Council 

Foundation 

FY 1977 

$20,000 

R7042-86 

Contact: Cultural Council 

Foundation. 1 500 Broadway. 

New York. NY 10036 



To Study the lighting, acoustic and stage 
requirements of the proposed York Per- 
forming Arts Center. A folder of materi- 
als on the project was prepared. 



To design a suitable facility to house the 
Clark Center for the Performing Arts' 
dance instruction program as well as a 
250-seat dance theater. An old bank 
building that was part of phase two of 
42nd Street Redevelopment Corpora- 
tion's Theater Row program was selected 
as the site. 



To formulate a comprehensive design for 
the renovation, expansion and reuse of 
the 1898 Colorado Chautauqua Audito- 
rium. A report on the acoustical and the- 
atrical upgrading of the auditorium was 
prepared. 



To plan and design expanded stage areas 
and additional lobby, reception, rehearsal 
and office space for the Ohio Theater. 
The Ohio, a National Historic Land- 
mark, is a 2,897-seat theater that has op- 
erated as a performing arts center since 
1969. Reports and drawings documented 
the study. 



To research and design improvements to 
a barn dating to the Civil War that was 
adapted for use as a summer theater in 
1974. 



To create a new theater district in New 
York City through architectural and 
planning assistance (on behalf of the 
42nd Street Redevelopment Corpora- 
tion). 



Cultural Council 

Foundation 

FY 1979 

$20,000 

92-4211-214 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Cultural Council 

Foundation, 1 75 Fifth 

Avenue, New York, NY 

lOOlO 



Dance Associates 

Foundation, Inc. 

FY 1977 

$1,850 

R70-42-87 

Contact: Dance Associates 

Foundation, Inc., 3594 

Multiview Drive. Los 

Angeles, CA 90068 



Dance Associates 

Foundation. Inc. 

FY 1981 

$29,000 

12-4230-054 

Contact: Vice-President. 

Dance Associates 

Foundation, 3594 Multiview 

Drive, Los Angeles, CA 

90068 



Dance Theater of Harlem 

FY 1980 

$30,000 

02-4230089 

Contact: Director, Dance 

Theater of Harlem, 466 

West 152nd Street, New 

York, NY 10031 



Design Coalition 

FY 1981 

$70,000 

PC 81-8 

Contact: Design Coalition, 

1 2 Greene Street, New 

York, NY 10013 



East-West Players, Inc. 

FY 1987 

$40,000 

87-4251-0106 

Contact: Administrator. 

East-West Players, Inc., 

4424 Santa Monica 

Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 

90029 



To plan for the renovation of a bank 
building and its adaptation as a theater, 
part of the 42nd Street Theater Row pro- 
gram. 



To formulate design plans for a dance 
theater serving the Los Angeles commu- 
nity and housing the Bella Lewitzky 
Dance Company. 



To plan and design a dance theater and 
academy in Los Angeles to serve local, 
regional and international companies and 
audiences. The aim was to provide a fa- 
cility in order to encourage dance com- 
panies to develop seasons in Los Angeles. 



To plan and design the renovation of two 
structures: the former American Geo- 
graphical Society building as offices and 
performance and rehearsal facilities, and 
an eight-unit apartment building as dor- 
mitory space. 



To develop a manual on the design of 
dance facilities. A 1 90-page book. Space 
for Dance, was published in 1984. 



To plan the renovation of the historic 
Union Church as a theater. The aims 
were to follow historic preservation 
guidelines while integrating contempo- 
rary design elements that establish its 
identity as a contemporary Asian-Ameri- 
can playhouse. 



106 CHAPTER THREE 



Educational Facilities 

Laboratories, Inc. 

FY 1981 

$90,000 

CA 81-19 

Contact: Director, 

Educational Facilities 

Laboratories, Inc., 680 Fifth 

Avenue, New York, NY 

10018 



Educational Facilities 
Laboratories, Inc. 
FY 1982 
$10,000 
22^250-230 

Contact: Executive Vice- 
President, Educational 
Facilities Laboratories, Inc., 
Academy for Educational 
Development, 680 Fifth 
Avenue, New York, NY 
10019 



El Teatro Campesino 

FY 1982 

$15,000 

22-4230-022 

Contact: General Manager, 

El Teatro Campesino, El 

Centre Campesino Cultural, 

FO. Box 1278, San Juan 

Bautista, CA 95045 



Elgin Theater Foundation 

FY 1979 

$30,000 

92-4211-256 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Elgin Theater Foundation, 

890 Broadway, New York, 

NY 10003 



Emerson College 

FY 1986 

$20,000 

86-4231-0187 

Contact: President, Emerson 

College, 100 Beacon Street, 

Boston, MA 021 16 



Fargo-Moorhead 

Community Theater 

FY 1979 

$8,000 

92^211-215 

Contact: General Manager, 

Fargo-Moorhead 

Community Theater, PO. 

Box 644, Fargo. ND 58107 



To prepare and distribute a publication 
on the adaptive reuse of the nation's un- 
derutilized and/or abandoned movie 
houses. 



To develop and produce a book evaluat- 
ing and documenting the design of exem- 
plary outdoor performing arts pavilions 
in the United States. 



For exterior and interior planning and 
design to convert a warehouse into the- 
ater, civic and cultural center space. The 
design was intended to complement the 
surrounding nineteenth-century buildings 
and plaza. Slides and plans were pro- 
duced. 



To plan and design the conversion of the 

Elgin Theater, an art deco cinema build- 
ing, into a modern theater for dance and 
a home for the Feld Ballet and other 
companies. A report on capital improve- 
ments was prepared. 



To prepare rehabilitation plans for the 
historic Saxon/Majestic Theater in 
downtown Boston as a site for commu- 
nity-based performances by Emerson 
College's Theater Arts Division and for 
other small theater groups in the metro- 
politan area. 



To host a design competition to explore 
creative solutions to the Fargo-Moorhead 
Community Theater's need for additional 
support space. The competition provided 
a great deal of regional visibility for the 
theater expansion project. 



Flynn Theater for the 

Performing Arts 

FY 1982 

$16,040 

22-4230023 

Contact: Project 

Coordinator, Flynn Theater 

for the Performing Arts, 

PO. Box 382, Burlington, 

VT 05402 



Flynn Theater for the 

Performing Arts 

FY 1986 

$21,100 

86-4231-0147 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Flynn Theater for the 

Performing Arts, 53 Main 

Street, Burlington, VT 

05401 



Focus Productions 

FY 1983 

$8,575 

32-425000032 

Contact: Producer, Focus 

Productions, 5917 Chabot 

Road, Oakland, CA 94618 



Forty-Second Street 
Development Corporation 
FY 1980 
$17,500 
02-4230-070 

Contact: President, Forty- 
Second Street Development 
Corporation, 326 West 42nd 
Street, New York, NY 
10036 



Gallery Theater, Inc. 

FY 1984 

$10,000 

42-4231-00003 

Contact: President, Gallery 

Theater, Inc., Chamber of 

Commerce, West Main 

Street, Ahoskie, NC 27910 



Genessee Valley Arts 

Foundation 

FY 1983 

$30,000 

32-4230-00001 

Contact: Producing 

Director, Genessee Valley 

Arts Foundation, 168 South 

Clinton Avenue, Rochester, 

NY 14604 



To develop design plans for the renova- 
tion and adaptive reuse of an art deco 
movie house, the Flynn Theater, as a 
community performing arts hall. 



To continue efforts to convert a 1930 art 
deco movie house into a regional per- 
forming arts facility by further refining 
the architectural master plan, devising 
landscape architecture improvements 
and expanding backstage facilities. 



To produce a documentary film on the 
renovation of Oakland's grand movie pal- 
ace, the Fox Theater. 



To plan and design a national theater 
center on the roof of the old West Side 
Airlines terminal building in New York 
City. 



To renovate the Gallery Theater, a small 
town vaudeville theater in rural north- 
eastern North Carolina that has been in 
continuous use since its first nickelodeon 
performance in 1906. A master plan, 
building analysis and rehabilitation rec- 
ommendations were prepared. 



To develop schematic designs for a small 
theater in a building that has been used 
as an exhibition hall, convention center, 
concert hall and Naval Reserve armory. 



DESIGN FOR THE ARTS 1 07 



Greater Paterson Arts 

Council, Inc. 

FY 1979 

$1,000 

92-4211-220 

Conlacl: Executive Director, 

Greater Paterson Arts 

Council, Inc., One West 

Broadway, Paterson, NJ 

07505 



Greater Providence 

Community Foundation 

FY 1978 

$5,000 

R80-42-77 

Conlacl: Executive Director, 

Greater Providence 

Community Foundation, 10 

Dorrance Street, 

Providence, RI 02903 



Hardy, Hugh 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R81-42-48N 

Conlacl: 257 Park Avenue 

South, New York, NY 

10010 



Harlem Urban Development 

Corporation 

FY 1979 

$17,500 

92-4211-268 

Conlacl: Project Director, 

Harlem Urban Development 

Corporation, 163 West 

1 25th Street, New York, 

NY 10027 



Historic Augusta, Inc. 

FY 1979 

$1,339 

92-4211-020 

Conlacl: Executive Director, 

Historic Augusta, Inc., 629 

Greene Street, Augusta, GA 

30902 



Hocking Valley Museum of 

Theatrical History, Inc. 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

92-4211-021 

Conlacl: Executive Director, 

Hocking Valley Museum of 

Theatrical History, Inc., 

Stuart's Opera House, 

Nelsonville, OH 45764 



To prepare the interior design portion 
(architecture, lighting and sound) of the 
overall plan to convert the Genesis The- 
ater into a properly designed and 
equipped community performance cen- 
ter. 



To complete design plans for a perform- 
ing arts center in the Ocean State The- 
ater, a restored 3,200-seat movie palace 
in Providence, Rhode Island. 



To study the reuse potential of movie 
palaces of the 1920s and 1930s. 



To engage in planning and development 
for the conversion of the Loew's Victoria 
Theater into a multi-theater rehearsal 
and exhibition facility. 



To evaluate structural requirements in 
connection with the rehabilitation of the 
Modjeska Theater. The theater, located 
in downtown Augusta, is an opulent and 
fanciful entertainment palace of Moor- 
ish-Persian design. 



For technical research and design neces- 
sary to reopen Stuart's Opera House, in 
Nelsonville, Ohio. The opera house was 
built in 1879. 



Hudson Valley Freedom 

Theater 

FY 1979 

$20,000 

92-4211-240 

Conlacl: Artistic Director, 

Hudson Valley Freedom 

Theater, 135 Grand Street, 

Box 82, Newburgh, NY 

12550 



Indiana Repertory Theater, 

Inc. 

FY 1978 

$15,000 

R80-42-72 

Conlacl: Project Director, 

Indiana Repertory Theater, 

Inc., 41 1 East Michigan 

Street, Indianapolis, IN 

46204 



Indiana State Symphony 

Society 

FY 1983 

$5,000 

32-423000192 

Conlacl: General Manager, 

Indianapolis Symphony, 

RO. Box 88207, 4600 

Sunset Avenue, 

Indianapolis. IN 46208 



Intiman Theater Company 

FY 1979 

$7,150 

92-4211-022 

Conlacl: General Manager, 

Intiman Theater Company, 

PO. Box 4246, Seattle, WA 

98104 



Intiman Theater 

FY 1983 

$25,000 

32-4230-00083 

Conlacl: Artistic Director, 

Intiman Theater, 801 Pike 

Street, Seattle, WA 98103 



Jacob's Pillow Dance 

Festival, Inc. 

FY 1981 

$25,000 

12-4230-160 

Conlacl: Artistic Director, 

Jacob's Pillow Dance 

Festival, Inc., RO. Box 287, 

Lee, MA 01238 



For architectural and preservation plan- 
ning for the rehabilitation and interior 
restoration of the Dutch Reformed 
Church building in Newburgh, New 
York. 



To complete plans for the adaptive use 
of the vacant Indiana Theater as a per- 
manent home to the Indiana Repertory 
Theater. 



To undertake the architectural design 
phase of the landmark Circle Theater's 
restoration as the permanent home of the 
Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra. 



To plan and design the rehabilitation of a 
building in Seattle's Pike Place Market 
historic district to create a permanent 
home for the Intiman Theater Compa- 
ny's programs and activities. 



To convert an old movie house into a 
new theater facility for the Intiman The- 
ater Company, a resident professional 
theater company. 



To undertake a site analysis and review 
of existing facilities and programming re- 
quirements for Jacob's Pillow, the oldest 
dance festival in North America. A pro- 
gram study and long-range plan were de- 
veloped. 



108 CHAPTER THREE 



Jacob's Pillow Dance 

Festival 

FY 1983 

$30,000 

32^23000186 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Jacob's Pillow Dance 

Festival. PO. Box 287, Lee, 

MA 01238 



Jazzmobile. Inc. 

FY 1981 

$30,000 

12^230-161 

Coniaci: Jazzmobile. Inc., 

1 59 West 1 27th Street, 

New York, NY 10027 



Knoxville Heritage, Inc. 
FY 1977 
$18,300 
R7a42-94 
Contact: President, 
Knoxville Heritage, Inc., 
RO. Box 1746, Knoxville, 
TN 37901 



League of Historic 

American Theaters 

FY 1982 

$9,450 

22-4250-141 

Contact: Executive 

Secretary, League of 

Historic American Theaters, 

1321 E Street, N.W., 

Washington, DC 20004 



Lipske, Michael 

FY 1984 

$9,600 

NEA DC A 84-2 

Contact: 3030 Wisconsin 

Avenue, N.W., Apt. 9, 

Washington, DC 20016 



Los Angeles Actors' Theater 

Foundation 

FY 1982 

$20,000 

22-4230027 

Contact: Producing 

Director, Los Angeles 

Actors' Theater Foundation, 

1089 North Oxford Avenue, 

Los Angeles, CA 90029 



Long Island University 
FY 1979 
$17,500 
92-4211-134 
Contact: Long Island 
University, University 
Center, Greenvale, NY 
11548 



To host an invitational competition to de- 
velop a master plan for site landscaping, 
reuse of existing structures and creation 
of new facilities at Jacob's Pillow. A vid- 
eotape and other materials documented 
the competition. 



To produce preliminary redesign sche- 
matics for the design development of a 
facility to house Jazzmobile's multipur- 
pose art operation. 



To undertake phase two of the Lamar 
House/ Bijou Theater renovation to cre- 
ate a performing arts center for Knox- 
ville, Tennessee. 



To complete cataloguing of a national 
listing of historic theater buildings, a tool 
for preservationists, architects and the- 
ater historians. The listing was published 
as The Directory of Historic American 
Theaters. 



To edit Space for Dance, a publication of 
the Design Arts Program. A $1,920 
amendment, NEA DCA 84-2.1, was 
made in 1984. 



To prepare plans, designs and working 
drawings for the Performing Arts Center, 
to be located in the historic landmark Se- 
curity Bank building. 



For design for rebuilding the Dome Au- 
ditorium at the C. W. Post Center as the 
Long Island Center for the Performing 
Arts. 



Lyric Foundation, Inc. 

FY 1977 

$20,000 

R7a42-96 

Contact: Vice-President, 

Lyric Foundation, Inc., 128 

West Mount Royal Avenue, 

Baltimore, MD 21201 



Metropolitan Center, Inc. 

FY 1978 

$15,000 

R8042-74 

Contact: President, Kent 

Corporation, Metropolitan 

Center, Inc., 45 Broad 

Street, Boston, MA 02109 



Minnesota Independent 

Choreographers' Alliance 

FY 1985 

$12,300 

52-4256-0113 

Contact: Chairman of the 

Board, Minnesota 

Independent 

Choreographers' Alliance, 

528 Hennepin Avenue, 

Suite 205, Minneapolis, MN 

55403 



Minnesota Opera Company 

FY 1980 

$30,000 

02-4240-001 

Contact: General Manager, 

Minnesota Opera Company, 

850 Grand Avenue, St. 

Paul, MN 55105 



Mount Baker Theater 

Committee 

FY 1984 

$20,000 

42^231-0027 

Contact: Chairman, Mount 

Baker Theater Committee, 

PO. Box 918, Bellingham, 

WA 98227 



Mutual Musicians 

Foundation 

FY 1982 

$20,000 

22-4230-203 

Contact: President, Mutual 

Musicians Foundation, 1823 

Highland, Kansas City, MO 

64108 



To provide architectural and engineering 
design fees for the planned expansion 
and renovation of the historic Lyric The- 
ater in Baltimore, Maryland. 



To prepare design plans to renovate and 
expand Boston's Music Hall for large- 
scale opera, ballet and popular music 
performances. 



To produce a publication. Dance Design 
for Minnesota, the result of the alliance's 
Arts Program and Site/ Building Feasi- 
bility Study. The study was undertaken 
in response to space needs in the Minne- 
sota dance community. A 100-page re- 
port was also produced. 



To design an opera house to house the 
Minnesota Opera and several smaller 
arts organizations as part of a larger re- 
development project. Architectural plans 
and a description of the design were pro- 
duced. 



To develop an architectural master plan 
for the 1927 Mount Baker Theater 
(listed on the National Register of His- 
toric Places), whose renovation is a key 
component of the urban revitalization of 
Bellingham, Washington. A videotape 
and three reports were produced. 



To prepare architectural designs for the 
final renovation of a group of buildings 
to house the Mutual Musicians' Founda- 
tion and related visual and performing 
arts activities. 



DESIGN FOR THE ARTS 109 



New Brunswick Cultural 

Center. Inc. 

FY 1985 

$10,000 

52^231-0027 

Contact: Executive Director. 

New Brunswick Cultural 

Center. Inc.. RO. Box 1114, 

New Brunswick, NJ 08903 



New Cycle Theater, Inc. 

FY 1979 

SI.OOO 

92-4211-224 

Contact: President, New 

Cycle Theater. Inc., 657 

Fifth Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 

11215 



New Jersey Theater 

Foundation 

FY 1977 

$20,000 

R7&42-100 

Contact: Managing 

Director, New Jersey 

Theater Foundation, Church 

Street and Trinity Place, 

Montclair, NJ 07042 



New York Landmarks 

Conservancy 

FY 1982 

$17,280 

22-»23(M)08 

Contact: Director, The Arts 

at Saint Ann's, New York 

Landmarks Conservancy, 1 1 

Broadway, New York, NY 

10004 



New York Shakespeare 

Festival 

FY 1982 

$20,000 

22-4230-205 

Contact: Producer, New 

York Shakespeare Festival, 

425 Lafayette Street, New 

York. NY 10003 



New York Shakespeare 

Festival 

FY 1983 

$30,000 

32-4230-0086 

Contact: Producer. New 

York Shakespeare Festival. 

425 Lafayette Street, New 

York, NY 10003 



To plan the adaptive reuse of the State 
Theater, a 1 92 1 movie palace designed 
by Thomas W. Lamb, as a cultural cen- 
ter for the performing arts, including the 
Princeton Ballet, Opera Theater of New 
Jersey and the New Jersey Symphonic 
Pops Orchestra. Slides and a report 
documented the project. 



To conduct feasibility studies for the 
conversion of a turn-of-the-century bath- 
house building into a multispace per- 
forming arts center. 



To conduct architectural planning for the 
conversion of a downtown building into a 
regional theater center for the educa- 
tional and theater programs of the Whole 
Theater Company. A folder of materials 
documented the effort. 



For research and design plans for a mul- 
tipurpose stage facility for the Church of 
Saint Ann and the Holy Trinity. The 
church is a historic Gothic revival land- 
mark in Brooklyn Heights which serves 
as a house of worship and a major per- 
forming arts center. A 65-page restora- 
tion report was prepared. 



To plan the renovation of the Public The- 
ater's Anspacher lobby space. The aims 
were to determine potential alternate 
uses of the restored lobby area and to in- 
vestigate the possibilities of incorporating 
permanent office space and energy-sav- 
ing options. Blueprints and cost estimates 
were prepared. 



For phase two of the Broadway Theater 
District Study. Phase one identified sig- 
nificant buildings and framed policies 
and goals. The goal of phase two was to 
produce a framework within which new 
construction and preservation could co- 
operatively contribute to the revitaliza- 
tion of the Times Square area and the 
support of the theater industry. 



Ninety-Second Street 
Young Men's and Young 
Women's Hebrew 
Association 
FY 1981 
$10,000 
12-4230-074 
Contact: Director of 
Performing Arts. Ninety- 
Second Street Young Men's 
and Young Women's 
Hebrew Association. 1 395 
Lexington Avenue. Ne\y 
York, NY 10028 



Oakland Ensemble Theater, 

Inc. 

FY 1978 

$15,000 

R8(>42-8 

Contact: Project Director, 

Oakland Ensemble Theater. 

Inc., RO. Box 24333, 

Oakland, CA 94623 



Oberlin College 

FY 1985 

$25,593 

52-4257-0028 

Contact: President. Oberlin 

College, Oberlin, OH 44074 



Oberlin College 

FY 1986 

$19,500 

86^255-0064 

Contact: Associate Provost, 

Oberlin College, Cox 

Administration Building, 

Oberlin, OH 44074 



Oberlin Dance Collective 

FY 1980 

$19,530 

02-4240^2 

Contact: Director, Oberlin 

Dance Collective, 223 

Mississippi Street, San 

Francisco, CA 94107 



Oberlin Dance Collective. 

Inc. 

FY 1981 

$20,000 

12-4230-187 

Contact: Performance 

Gallery Director. Oberlin 

Dance Collective. 3153 17th 

Street. San Francisco. CA 

94110 



To conduct a feasibility study for the 
conversion of Buttenwieser Hall into a 
300-seat alternative performing arts 
space. The space was planned to house a 
range of performing arts activities, in- 
cluding professional theater, music, 
dance, poetry readings and children's 
entertainment. A 1 50-page study report 
was issued. 



For technical studies, analysis of code re- 
quirements and architectural and engi- 
neering designs for the renovation of the 
historic Ginn House for use as a theater. 



To conduct a national design competition 
for the construction of a bandstand on 
the town green in Oberlin. The outdoor 
performance space was intended for use 
by both the College Conservancy's musi- 
cians and by community musical orga- 
nizations. 



To produce The Oberlin Book of Band- 
stands, a catalogue in which fifty of the 
best designs from the Great Bandstand 
Design Competition are reproduced 
along with essays about the history of the 
bandstand in America. The book was 
published by the Preservation Press in 
1987 and was written by Frederick S. 
Starr. 



To design and plan a community arts 
center housing the rehearsal and perfor- 
mance spaces of the Oberlin Dance Col- 
lective and the Margaret Jenkins Dance 
Company. 



To plan and design an annex to the Per- 
formance Gallery housing backstage, 
storage, classroom and administrative of- 
fice space. The Performance Gallery 
serves as theater, gallery and studio facil- 
ity to San Francisco's Mission district. A 
videotape on the project was produced. 



110 CHAPTER THREE 



Off-OfT Broadway Alliance, 

Inc. 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R 80-12-93 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Off-Off Broadway Alliance, 

Inc., 162 West 56th Street, 

New York, NY 10019 



Old Globe Theater 

FY 1979 

$17,500 

92-4211-136 

Contact: Artistic Director, 

Old Globe Theater, PO. 

Box 33838, San Diego, CA 

92103 



Old Globe Theater 
FY 1981 
$25,000 
12-4230-184 
Contact: Director of 
Development, Old Globe 
Theater, RO. Box 2171, 
San Diego, C A 921 1 2 



Opera Company of Boston 

FY 1979 

$30,000 

92-4211-010 

Contact: Manager, Opera 

Company of Boston, 539 

Washington Street, Boston, 

MA 021 11 



Painted Bride Art Center 

FY 1982 

$4,000 

22-4230-142 

Contact: Program Director, 

Painted Bride Art Center, 

146 North Broad Street, 

Philadelphia, PA 19106 



Paper Mill Playhouse 

FY 1980 

$20,000 

02-4230-099 

Contact: President, Paper 

Mill Playhouse, Millburn, 

NJ 07041 



To produce the 206-page Will It Make a 
Theater?, and a seminar to familiarize 
New York theater groups with building 
code requirements, licenses and alterna- 
tive spaces. 



To design a replacement for the Old 
Globe Theater building. A brief report 
on the project was issued. 



To complete planning studies and design 
for the rebuilding of the Lowell Davis 
Festival Theater, part of a long-range 
plan for a cultural complex containing 
three performing arts centers and other 
facilities. The effort was documented in 
slides. 



To design a new stage house and other 
facilities for the Savoy Theater. The Sa- 
voy is one of the last and grandest vaude- 
ville houses ever built. The renovated 
structure was intended as the permanent 
home of Sarah Caldwell's Opera Com- 
pany of Boston. 



To conduct an architectural design study 
to renovate an industrial space as a home 
for the living arts, including a 200-seat 
performance space, gallery, offices and 
rehearsal workshop area. A narrative 
summary of the project was issued. 



To design the reconstruction of the Paper 
Mill Playhouse, a 1 30-year-old mill struc- 
ture destroyed by fire in January 1980. 
Architectural drawings and plans were 
created, and these attempted to retain 
the spirit of the previous building while 
providing an exemplary facility. Two 
$10,000 grants were made in 1981. 



Paramount Theater for the 

Performing Arts 

FY 1977 

$17,500 

R70-42-101 

Contact: President, 

Paramount Theater for the 

Performing Arts, PO. Box 

1205, Austin, TX 78767 



Performing Arts Center at 

Bath 

FY 1978 

$15,000 

R80-42-9 

Contact: President, 

Performing Arts Center at 

Bath, 804 Washington 

Street, Bath, ME 04530 



Performing Arts Council of 

the Music Center 

FY 1981 

$16,500 

12-4230-171 

Contact: President, Los 

Angeles Council, 

Performing Arts Council of 

the Music Center, 135 

North Grand Avenue, Los 

Angeles, C A 90012 



Performing Arts Foundation 

of Long Island 

FY 1978 

$15,000 

R80-42-I43 

Contact: Producer, 

Performing Arts Foundation 

of Long Island, 1 85 Second 

Street, Huntington Station, 

NY 11746 



Performing Artists/Omaha, 

Inc. 

FY 1979 

$20,000 

92-4211-225 

Contact: Performing 

Artists/Omaha, Inc., PO. 

Box 3627, Main Station, 

Omaha, NE 68103 



Pilobolus, Inc 

FY 1983 

$25,000 

32-4230-00172 

Contact: Manager, 

Pilobolus, Inc., Box 233, 

Washington, CT 06793 



To develop an architectural master plan 
for the restoration of the historic Para- 
mount Theater as a performing arts cen- 
ter for Austin, Texas. 



To prepare designs for a 400-seat theater 
in a nineteenth-century Gothic revival 
church, to convert it into a performing 
arts center. A 100-page feasibility study 
was issued. 



To develop a master plan to expand ex- 
isting facilities of the Music Center onto 
adjacent county-owned lots as part of a 
mixed-use cultural-commercial develop- 
ment in downtown Los Angeles. A sum- 
mary statement and a development pro- 
posal were produced. 



To design a low-cost, 500-seat theater 
within an existing building for the 
Mainstage series of the Performing Arts 
Foundation of Long Island. 



To provide architectural and interior de-' 
sign assistance for the rehabilitation of 
the World Theater. Performing Artists/ 
Omaha is the first fully professional rep- 
ertory theater serving the Midlands. 



To design a regional dance center as a 
home for Pilobolus, a dance group, and 
as a studio and resource for the perform- 
ing arts in the area. An invitational de- 
sign competition was held, with presenta- 
tions made before directors, staff, 
dancers, students and other community 
members. 



DESIGN FOR THE ARTS 111 



Play House 

FY 1977 

$20,000 

R70-42-82 

Contact: Director, The Play 

House. 2040 East 86th 

Street, Cleveland. OH 

44106 



Play House 

FY 1982 

$25,000 

22-4230-003 

Contact.- Director, The Play 

House. 2040 East 86th 

Street, Cleveland, OH 

44106 



Playhouse Square 

Foundation 

FY 1978 

$30,000 . 

R80-42-188 

Contact: Playhouse Square 

Foundation. 1621 Euclid 

Avenue. Suite 810, 

Cleveland, OH 44115 



Portland Center for the 

Visual Arts 

FY 1979 

$9,350 

92-4211-028 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Portland Center for the 

Visual Arts, 1 1 7 Northwest 

Fifth, Portland. OR 97209 



Provincetown Playhouse on 

the Wharf, Inc. 

FY 1978 

$20,000 

R80-42-119N 

Contact: Treasurer, 

Provincetown Playhouse on 

the Wharf, Inc., 2 Gosnold 

Street, PO. Box 477, 

Provincetown, MA 02657 



Provincetown Playhouse on 

the Wharf, Inc. 

FY 1979 

$20,000 

92-4211-241 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Provincetown Playhouse on 

the Wharf, Inc., 2 Gosnold 

Street, Provincetown, MA 

02657 



To undertake the schematic and design 
development phases of a project to con- 
solidate the Play House's two facilities at 
its 86th Street location in Cleveland. A 
packet of materials documented the ef- 
fort. 



To plan and design the adaptation of a 
former Sears department store for the 
Play House's use: providing support 
space for the theater and income-gener- 
ating retail space to help defray the 
building's operating costs. The project 
generated a proposal for the Cleveland 
Play House Theater and Dining Club. 



To provide architectural assistance, tech- 
nical information and recommendations 
concerning the reuse of a complex of 
architecturally significant vaudeville and 
legitimate theaters known as Playhouse 
Square. Five major performing arts orga- 
nizations participated in the study. A 
1 50-page feasibility report was issued. 



For research, planning and design of a 
warehouse space for use as a perfor- 
mance and media facility. The project is 
sponsored by the Portland Center for Vi- 
sual Arts, an alternative space founded 
by Portland artists in 1972 to comple- 
ment existing cultural activities. 



To develop a design program and a de- 
signer-selection process as part of efforts 
to replace the Provincetown Playhouse, 
destroyed by fire in March 1977. A re- 
port on the design charette was pro- 
duced. 



To support design development of plans 
by architect William Warner, the win- 
ning designer for the new Provincetown 
Playhouse and Eugene O'Neill Archival 
Center. A report, Prospects and Poten- 
tials, was issued. 



Provincetown Playhouse on 

the Wharf, Inc. 

FY 1980 

$10,000 

02-4251-214 

Contact: Provincetown 

Playhouse on the Wharf, 

Inc., 2 Gosnold Street, PO. 

Box 477, Provincetown. MA 

02657 



Puerto Rican Traveling 

Theater Company, Inc. 

FY 1978 

$25,000 

R80-42-11 

Contact: Puerto Rican 

Traveling Theater 

Company, Inc., 141 West 

94th Street, New York, NY 

10025 



Rancho Bernardo 

Recreation Council, Inc. 

FY 1982 

$6,000 

22-4230-118 

Contact: Program 

Coordinator, Rancho 

Bernardo Recreation 

Council, Inc., 10920 Via 

Frontera, San Diego, CA 

92127 



Rancho Bernardo 

Symphony on the Green 

FY 1981 

$15,000 

12-4230-077 

Contact: Project Director, 

Rancho Bernardo 

Symphony on the Green, 

17975 Sencillo Drive, San 

Diego, CA 92128 



Research Foundation of the 
City University of New 
York 
FY 1979 
$15,000 
92-4211-227 
Contact: Professor, 
Research Foundation of the 
City University of New 
York, 138th Street and 
Convent Avenue, New 
York, NY 10031 



Richmond Symphony 

FY 1979 

$7,500 

92-4211-226 

Contact: Assistant Manager. 

The Richmond Symphony. 

15 South Fifth Street. 

Richmond. VA 23219 



To disseminate information relating to 
design concepts and issues stemming 
from an earlier design competition and to 
address design and planning issues re- 
lated to the construction of a new theater 
facility. 



To design a 199-seat theater in a nine- 
teenth-century firehouse by Nicholas Le- 
Brun as the permanent home of New 
York City's Puerto Rican Traveling The- 
ater Company. 



To undertake a three-stage planning and 
design study for the proposed Rancho 
Bernardo Center for the Performing 
Arts. A brief study report was issued. 



To develop an architectural program and 
to select an architect for the Rancho 
Bernardo Center for the Performing 
Arts, located in a city-owned regional 
park and intended as home to all the per- 
forming arts. 



To engage in planning and preliminary 
designs for the renovation of Part Gym 
as a multipurpose dance facility. 



To prepare a feasibility study investigat- 
ing the po.ssible adaptive reuse of Lowe's 
Theater as a home for the Richmond 
Symphony and as a performing arts cen- 
ter. A report entitled To Realize a 
Dream was issued. 



112 CHAPTER THREE 



Rising Sun 

FT 1977 

$10,000 

R70-42-107 

Contact: Project Director. 

Rising Sun, 1050 Old Pecos 

Trail, Santa Fe.NM 87501 



Save a Farm, Inc. 

FY 1986 

$28,875 

86-4231-0068 

Contact: Treasurer, Save a 

Farm, Inc., 36 West 29657 

Wern Way, Waukesha, WI 

53186 



Save the Theaters, Inc. 

FY 1986 

$15,000 

86-4256-0022 

Contact: President, Save the 

Theaters, Inc.. 165 West 

46th Street, New York, NY 

10036 



Save the Tivoli, Inc. 

FY 1983 

$13,800 

32^23000061 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Save the Tivoli, Inc., 3325 

Holmead Place, N.W.. 

Washington, DC 20010 



Second Stage Theater, Inc. 

FY 1982 

$19,000 

22-4230-222 

Contact: Artistic Director, 

Second Stage Theater, Inc., 

200 West 72nd Street, Suite 

20, New York, NY 10023 



Shaker Barn Theater, Inc. 

FY 1982 

$22,600 

22-4230-210 

Contact: President, Shaker 

Barn Theater, Inc., 330 

West 54th Street, Lobby J, 

New York, NY 10036 



Snug Harbor Cultural 

Center, Inc. 

FY 1986 

$30,000 

86^257-0065 

Contact: President, Snug 

Harbor Cultural Center, 

Inc., 1000 Richmond 

Terrace, Staten Island, NY 

10301 



To formulate long-range architectural 
and management plans for the Santa Fe 
Armory for the Arts. An audience survey 
and report on the Santa Fe Council for 
the Arts were developed. 



To create a plan for a self-sustaining resi- 
dent performing and visual arts center at 
the historically significant Wern Farm in 
Waukesha, Wisconsin. 



For a program to preserve theaters, espe- 
cially those located in small communities 
and built at the turn of the century. The 
program focused on restoration research, 
theater restoration and design and the 
economics of restoration and theater 
management. 



To conduct an architectural feasibility 
study for the restoration of the historic 
Tivoli Theater, which houses a 2,500-seat 
auditorium, ten shops and thirty-five of- 
fice suites. 



To design a new theater space compat- 
ible with the surrounding neighborhood 
and of high design quality. 



To prepare an architectural design for 
the conversion of the Great Stone Barn 
to a performing arts center. The barn is 
an irreplaceable Shaker structure and 
National Historic Landmark which was 
gutted by fire in 1972. 



For a design competition for the Music 
Hall, Snug Harbor Cultural Center's cor- 
nerstone facility built in 1892. The de- 
sign challenges included adaptation of a 
historic theater for contemporary use and 
integration of a new building with an 
older historic one. A catalogue 
documenting the competition was pub- 
lished. 



Southeastern Academy of 
Theater and Music, Inc. 
FY 1977 
$10,000 
R70-42-109 
Contact: Executive 
Director/ Artistic Director, 
Southeastern Academy of 
Theater and Music, Inc., 
3213 Roswell Road, N.E., 
Atlanta, GA 30305 



Strand Theater of 

Shreveport Corporation 

FY 1978 

$3,000 

R80-42-80 

Contact: Strand Theater of 

Shreveport, PO. Box 2096, 

Shreveport, LA 7 1 1 66 



Temple University 
FY 1983 
$30,000 
32-4230-00191 
Contact: Director of 
Campus Planning, Temple 
University, Broad Street 
and Montgomery Avenue, 
Philadelphia, PA 



Theater by the Sea 
FY 1979 
$10,000 
92-4211-032 
Contact: Producing 
Director, Theater by the 
Sea, 1 25 Bow Street, 
Portsmouth, NH 03801 



Theater by the Sea 

Performing Arts Foundation 

FY 1985 

$20,000 

52-4231-0161 

Contact: President, Theater 

by the Sea Performing Arts 

Foundation, Box 1501, 

Kingston, Rl 02881 



Theater for the New City 

Foundation 

FY 1983 

$20,470 

32-4230-00189 

Contact: Managing 

Director, Theater for the 

New City Foundation, 162 

Second Avenue, New York, 

NY 10003 



To undertake preliminary site planning 
and design as part of the renovation and 
expansion of the Academy Theater in 
Atlanta, Georgia. 



To develop acoustic guidelines and speci- 
fications for the Strand Theater as part 
of the rehabilitation of the structure as a 
multiple-use hall for the performing arts. 



To commission an architect to plan the 
adaptive reuse of the Romanesque-style 
Baptist Temple as an elegant concert 
hall and performing arts center. The 
building's large auditorium has served 
Temple University and the community in 
the past but has been closed for the past 
ten years. Two reports were produced. 



To plan the adaptation of a nineteenth- 
century brewery building located on the 
Portsmouth waterfront as a 300-seat the- 
ater for Theater by the Sea, a year-round 
professional theater established in 1964. 



To develop a master plan and site eval- 
uation in connection with the rehabilita- 
tion of a historic summer barn theater, 
the centerpiece of an expanded perform- 
ing arts center. The Theater by the Sea 
is listed on the National Register of His- 
toric Places and is one of only six sum- 
mer barn theaters remaining from the 
1930s. 



To conduct an architectural feasibility 
study and to produce schematic drawings 
to adapt and renovate an underutilized 
public market into a complex of three 
theaters. 



DESIGN FOR THE ARTS 113 



Theater Historical Society 

FY 1981 

$7,500 

12-4221-148 

Contact: Instructor/ 

Researcher, Theater 

Historical Society, c/o 

Frederick Beall, RO. Box 

767, San Francisco, CA 

94101 



Theater Historical Society 

of America 

FY 1985 

$30,000 

52-4256-0015 

Contact: Vice-President, 

Theater Historical Society 

of America, 6510 41st 

Avenue, Hyattsville, MD 

20782 



Theater Project Company 

FY 1982 

$20,000 

22-4230-036 

Contact: President, Theater 

Project Company, 1 820 

Market Street, St. Louis, 

MO 63103 



Town of Narragansett 

FY 1978 

$3,000 

R80-42-82 

Contact: Federal Programs 

Coordinator, Town of 

Narragansett, 25 Fifth 

Avenue, Narragansett, RI 

02882 



Troy Savings Bank Music 

Hall Corporation 

FY 1982 

$16,990 

22^230038 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Troy Savings Bank Music 

Hall Corporation, 33 

Second Street, Troy, NY 

12180 



Twyla Tharp Dance 

Foundation, Inc. 

FY 1982 

$15,000 

22-4230-215 

Contact: Artistic Director, 

Twyla Tharp Dance 

Foundation, Inc., 38 Walker 

Street, New York. NY 

10013 



To upgrade and expand the readership of 
the quarterly journal Marquee and to ex- 
pand the Theater Historical Society's 
files and reference materials on historic 
theaters. 



To expand and update American Picture 
Palaces, a film sketching the social and 
architectural history of the movie palace 
and its current renaissance. 



To provide design services for the reuse 
of the 1 600 Lyn Theater as home to the 
Theater Project Company's main stage 
theater, children's theater and support 
facilities. A videotape on the effort was 
produced. 



To plan and design a band shell for per- 
forming arts activities in Narragansett, 
Rhode Island. Architectural specifica- 
tions and a report were produced. 



To develop a master plan for the Troy 
Music Hall. The aim was to provide an 
assessment of the music hall's physical 
location atop the Troy Savings Bank and 
its production capabilities to assure safe 
and economical operation. A 50-page re- 
port was produced. 



To conduct a design feasibility study to 
consider locating the Twyla Tharp Dance 
Foundation and Company in the Strand 
movie palace. The facility was deemed 
unsuitable, and an architect was hired to 
develop a proposal for space in the Bat- 
tery Maritime Building. 



Vermont Council on the 

Arts. Inc. 

FY 1985 

$20,000 

52-4231-0097 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Vermont Council on the 

Arts, Inc., 136 State Street, 

Montpelier, VT 05602 



Vincent-Davis, Paul 

FY 1981 

$2,500 

11-4213-231 

Contact: 31 Station Street, 

Brookline, MA 02146 



Washington Triangle 
Cultural Association 
FY 1982 
$15,000 
22-4230-040 
Contact: President, 
Washington Triangle 
Cultural Association, 3615 
Grandel Square, St. Louis, 
MO 63108 



Waterloo Foundation for the 

Arts, Inc. 

$10,000 

FY 1978 

R8(M2-184C 

Contact: President, 

Waterloo Foundation for the 

Arts, Inc., Waterloo Village, 

Stanhope, NJ 07874 



Waterloo Foundation for the 

Arts. Inc. 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

92-4211-035 

Contact: President. 

Waterloo Foundation for the 

Arts. Inc.. Waterloo Village, 

Stanhope, NJ 07874 



Wolf Trap Foundation for 

the Performing Arts 

FY 1982 

$17,500 

22-4230^115 

Contact: President, Wolf 

Trap Foundation for the 

Performing Arts, 1624 Trap 

Road. Vienna. VA 22180 



To create a master plan for the conver- 
sion of Button Bay State Park from a 
recreational facility into a seasonal festi- 
val park. A study was produced that in- 
cludes plans for programming and facil- 
ity development, management and 
financing. 



To design stage sites, house seating and 
lighting for the renovation of the Puppet 
Showplace, located in a storefront on 
Station Street in Brookline Village, 
Massachusetts. 



To design interior renovations to the his- 
toric Fox Theater, including acoustic, 
electrical, stage and seating improve- 
ments. The theater is located within St. 
Louis's cultural district. 



To conduct feasibility studies for a large 
permanent music shed to be used for per- 
formances during the summer festival at 
Waterloo Village. A $10,000 amend- 
ment, grant number 92-421 1-902.1, was 
made in 1979. 



To undertake a feasibility study on con- 
struction of a music shed for perfor- 
mances during the summer festival at 
Waterloo Village. 



To develop options and alternatives for 
planning and design activities involved in 
the reconstruction of the Filene Center, 
gutted by fire in April 1982. 



114 CHAPTER THREE 



Wolf Trap Foundation for 

the Performing Arts 

FY 1982 

$2,000 

22-4230-243 

Contact: President, Wolf 

Trap Foundation for the 

Performing Arts. 1624 Trap 

Road, Vienna, VA 22180 



Wood. Marilyn B. 
FY 1983 
$10,000 
3M213-00019 
Contact: President. The 
Celebrations Group. 100 
Third Avenue. New York. 
NY 10003 



Worthington Hall 

Foundation. Inc. 

FY 1986 

$14,500 

86-4231-0144 

Contact: President. 

Worthington Hall 

Foundation, Inc., RO. Box 

1 84, Shawnee-on-Delaware, 

PA 18356 



To continue planning for the reconstruc- 
tion of Wolf Trap's Filene Center. 



To document the woric of celebration art- 
ists and specialists in related fields. Cele- 
brations involving collaborations between 
performing and design arts invite audi- 
ence involvement, sharing and a height- 
ened awareness of the structures in 
which we live and work. 



For interior and stage designs for the 
renovation of Worthington Hall, an 
eighty-two-year-old community center 
destroyed by arson in 1985. The hall had 
been the home of the Shawnee Play- 
house for nine years. 



Visual and Media Arts 

Planning and design for new and restored museums, galler- 
ies, movie theaters, film screening facilities and resource 
centers. 



African American Museums 

Association 

FY 1985 

$15,024 

52-4256-0099 

Contact: Executive Director. 

African American Museums 

Association. 420 Seventh 

Street. N.W., Washington. 

DC 20004 



Afro-American Museum of 

Detroit 

FY 1981 

$30,000 

12^250-154 

Contact: Chairman of the 

Board, Afro-American 

Museum of Detroit, 1553 

West Grand Boulevard, 

Detroit, MI 48208 



To support a seminar on the architec- 
tural and environmental design process 
for staff and administration of African 
American museums. The goal was to aid 
member institutions in meeting Ameri- 
can Association of Museums' building 
accreditation standards. 



To plan and design a new facility to 
house the collections, exhibitions and li- 
brary of the Afro-American Museum 
and to provide adequate storage space. A 
planning committee report was prepared. 



American Association of 

Museums 

FY 1979 

$19,500 

92-4212-243 

Contact: Editor. American 

Association of Museums. 

1055 Thomas Jefferson 

Street, Washington, DC 

20007 



American Film Institute 
FY 1980 
$4,000 
02-4250-065 
Contact: Director of 
Development, American 
Film Institute, John F. 
Kennedy Center for the 
Performing Arts, 
Washington, DC 20566 



Amigos del Museo del 

Barrio 

FY 1979 

$27,800 

92-4233-198 

Contact: President, Amigos 

del Museo del Barrio. 1230 

Fifth Avenue, New York, 

NY 10029 



Amigos del Museo del 

Barrio 

FY 1980 

$10,000 

02-4230-069 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Amigos del Museo del 

Barrio, 1230 Fifth Avenue, 

New York, NY 10029 



Arts and Architecture 

Magazine 

FY 1982 

$11,500 

22-4250-126 

Contact: Editor, Arts and 

Architecture Magazine, c/o 

The Schindler House, 835 

North Kings Road, Los 

Angeles, CA 90069 



Brooklyn Historical Society 

FY 1987 

$15,000 

87-4251-0033 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Brooklyn Historical Society, 

1 28 Pierrepont Street, 

Brooklyn, NY 11201 



To produce a special edition of Museum 
News magazine on museums, preserva- 
tion and adaptive reuse. 



To commission original art work by Ar- 
thur Amiolte, a Native American artist, 
to appear on all materials associated with 
the Native American Image on Film 
project. 



To conduct a planning and design study 
for improvements to El Museo del Barrio 
so that it may better serve the commu- 
nity. 



To plan and design renovations to El 
Museo del Barrio, including new offices, 
a children's museum, a pre-Columbian 
environment and a contemporary gallery. 



For a special issue of Arts and Architec- 
ture on the planning and design of art 
museums. Four case studies were fea- 
tured: the de Menil Collection in Hous- 
ton, the Museum of Contemporary Art 
in Los Angeles, the ARCO wing of the 
Los Angeles County Museum of Art and 
the adobe addition to the Museum of 
Fine Arts in New Mexico. 



To redesign the ground floor of the G. B. 
Post Building as an exhibit gallery. The 
aim was to provide a suitable environ- 
ment for permanent exhibits devoted to 
Brooklyn history while preserving the 
original character of the space. 



DESIGN FOR THE ARTS 115 



Brooklyn Institute of Arts 

and Science 

FY 1986 

$25,000 

86-4257-0063 

Contact: Director, Brooklyn 

Institute of Arts and 

Science, 200 Eastern 

Parkway, Brooklyn, NY 

11238 



Brooklyn Institute of Arts 

and Sciences 

FY 1987 

$20,000 

87-4251-0034 

Contact: Director, Brooklyn 

Institute of Arts and 

Sciences, 200 Eastern 

Parkway, Brooklyn, NY 

11238 



Carnegie-Mellon University 
FY 1986 
$39,400 
86-4252-0055 
Contact: Treasurer, 
Carnegie-Mellon University, 
5000 Forbes Avenue, 
Pittsburgh, PA 15213 



Cedar Rapids Art 

Association 

FY 1984 

$13,000 

42-4231-0019 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Cedar Rapids Art 

Association, Cedar Rapids, 

I A 54201 



Central Louisiana Art 

Association 

FY 1977 

$6,700 

R70-42-76 

Contact: Director, Central 

Louisiana Art Association, 

P.O. Box 5791, Alexandria, 

LA 71301 



City of Ogden 

FY 1979 

$11,975 

92-4211-229 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Union Station, 25th and 

Wall, Ogden, UT 84401 



To conduct a design competition for a 
master plan to reorganize and complete 
the museum's historic landmark building 
in harmony with the original 1 890s de- 
sign of architects McKim, Mead & 
White. The winning design corrects defi- 
ciencies and problems while remaining 
true to the original intent. 



To prepare an exhibition and publication 
documenting the Brooklyn Museum's in- 
ternational master plan design compe- 
tition. The project also focused on the 
history of design competitions, the com- 
petition process and the design issues 
unique to this competition. 



To research and develop techniques for 
evaluating the long-term effects of mu- 
seum design on building function. The 
study, Architecture for Art's Sake: Van- 
tage Point Evaluation of Museum Per- 
formance for Future Design, includes an 
assessment of eight museums in the 
United States, France, Germany and 
England. 



To develop an adaptive reuse design for 
the 1 903 Cedar Rapids Library as the 
new Cedar Rapids Museum of Art. The 
library was designed by Josselyn and 
Taylor in the Italian palazzo style. A vid- 
eotape on the project was produced. 



To rehabilitate a nineteenth-century 
bank building as a visual arts facility for 
Alexandria, Louisiana. This stage of 
planning consisted of a comprehensive 
architectural survey. Slides and plans for 
the building were prepared. 



To devise plans for undeveloped areas of 
Union Station in Ogden, Utah. The aim 
was to enhance the existing arts and 
civic functions of the facility, including a 
museum for classic cars, an expansion of 
Amtrak, theater support areas, landscap- 
ing and a motel-railroad area. 



Delaware State Arts 

Council 

FY 1977 

$20,000 

R70-42-88 

Contact: Community 

Coordinator, Delaware State 

Arts Council, 1 105 Market 

Street, Wilmington, DE 

19801 



Evans Run Art Association, 

Inc. 

FY 1979 

$5,000 

92-4211-016 

Contact: Board of Directors, 

Evans Run Art Association, 

Inc., 1 1 1 Evans Run Drive, 

Martinsburg, WV 25401 



Exploratorium 

FY 1981 

$28,655 

12-423(W)60 

Contact: Project Director, 

The Exploratorium, 3691 

Lyon Street, San Francisco, 

CA 94123 



Fayetteville Museum of Art 
FY 1977 
$2,500 
R70-42-90 
Contact: President, 
Fayetteville Museum of Art, 
PO. Box 1861, Fayetteville, 
NC 28302 



Film Art Fund, Inc. 

FY 1980 

$30,000 

06-4230-090 

Contact: General Director, 

Film Art Fund, Inc., 80 

Wooster Street, New York, 

NY 10012 



Film in the Cities 

FY 1986 

$30,000 

86-4231-0074 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Film in the Cities, 2388 

University Avenue, Saint 

Paul. MN 55114 



To plan and design the adaptive use of a 
historic textile mill as the home of the 
Delaware Art Museum. The renovation 
plans incorporated space for visual and 
performing artists and a management 
plan for a self-sufficient artists' cooper- 
ative. 



To plan and design the adaptation of the 
Boydville mansion and grounds, listed on 
the National Register, for use as an art 
museum and art education center serving 
West Virginia's eastern panhandle. A 
videotape and report were prepared. 



To conduct planning and design activi- 
ties to complete the development of the 
1915 Maybeck Palace of Fine Arts cul- 
tural center. The building was intended 
for a museum of perception — where art 
and science are combined in meaningful 
and stimulating ways. 



To formulate a master plan for prelimi- 
nary site development design on behalf 
of the proposed Fayetteville Museum of 
Art. 



To plan and design the conversion of the 
old Second Avenue courthouse into An- 
thology Film Archive's new headquar- 
ters, a cinema museum. The aim was to 
achieve a compatibility between the his- 
toric outer shell and a contemporary in- 
ner structure suitable for the archive's 
preservation, exhibition and study needs. 



To design a center that suits the needs of 
Film in the Cities, UCVideo and Fresh 
Air Radio, three media organizations 
which require more space. The design 
challenge was to make efficient use of 
shared spaces while maintaining the sep- 
arate identities of the three tenants. 



116 CHAPTER THREE 



Hawaii Loa College 
FY 1983 
$50,000 
32-4230^184 
Contact: President, Hawaii 
Loa College, 45-045 
Kamehameha Highway, 
Kaneohe, Oahu, HI 96744 



Los Angeles Film Center 
FY 1984 
$5,000 

42-4231-0156 
Contact: President, Los 
Angeles Film Center, 3612 
Woodhill Canyon Road, 
Studio City, CA 91604 



Los Angeles Film Center 

FY 1985 

$20,000 

52^231-0156 

Contact: Artistic Director, 

Los Angeles Film Center, 

American Cinematheque, 

RO. Box 5538, Beverly 

Hills, CA 90201 



Marquette University 
FY 1983 
$10,000 
32-4230-00002 
Contact: Chairman, Fine 
Arts, Marquette University, 
402 Varsity Building, 1324 
West Wisconsin Avenue, 
Milwaukee, Wl 53233 



Media Study, Inc. 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R70-42-97 

Contact: Director, Media 

Study, Inc., 207-211 

Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, 

NY 14202 



Moving Image, Inc 

FY 1980 

$10,000 

02-4230-098 

Contact: President, Moving 

Image, Inc., 15 Vandem 

Street, New York, NY 

10013 



To conduct an international design com- 
petition for the Pacific Center for the 
Media Arts, a new media performing 
arts facility serving the college and sur- 
rounding communities. The aim was to 
combine recent videodisc and computer 
technology with a traditional proscenium 
theater. 



To plan the adaptive reuse of the Pan 
Pacific Auditorium as a permanent pub- 
lic cultural center for the media arts 
(film and video) as well as for lectures, 
seminars, study and research. Slides and 
a summary report were produced. 



To continue the reuse design of the his- 
toric Pan Pacific Auditorium in Los An- 
geles, intended to house three theaters 
and a multimedia laboratory. Blueprints 
and informational materials were pro- 
duced. 



To design a new art museum for Mar- 
quette University's permanent collection 
and exhibition program, to be located on 
Milwaukee's West Side, an area under- 
going urban revitalizatlon. 



To investigate the reuse potential of the 
former Mars Hotel in downtown Buffalo, 
New York, as a home for Media Study's 
programs and other media arts services. 



To convert a large garage space into two 
cinemas: one to accommodate the expan- 
sion of Film Forum's screening schedule 
and to provide a preview screening room 
for filmmakers; the other to be rented to 
filmmakers and distributors to present an 
International selection. 



Museum of Fine Arts 

FY 1984 

$25,000 

42-4257-0028 

Contact: Director, Museum 

of Fine Arts, PO. Box 6826, 

Houston, TX 77265 



McHenry Theater Project, 

Inc. 

FY 1980 

$22,000 

02-4230-094 

Contact: McHenry Theater 

Project, Inc., 1114 Light 

Street, Baltimore, MD 

21202 



National Museum of 
Women in the Arts 
FY 1985 
$30,000 
52-4231-0025 
Contact: President, The 
National Museum of 
Women in the Arts, 4590 
MacArthur Boulevard, 
N.W, Washington, DC 
20007 



Nemec, Boyce 

FY 1986 

$10,000 

86-4213-0041 

Contact: Boyce Nemec 

Designs, PO. Box 566, 

Norfolk, CT 06058 



New Orleans Museum of 

Art 

FY 1980 

$10,000 

02-4230-073 

Contact: Director, New 

Orleans Museum of Art, 

PO. Box 19123, New 

Orleans, LA 70179 



New Orleans Museum of 
Art 

FY 1983 
$30,000 
32-4230-00085 
Contact: Director, New 
Orleans Museum of Art, 
Box 19123, New Orleans, 
LA 70179 



To host a national competition and an 
on-site charette for the design of a 
100,000-square-foot addition to the 
Houston Museum of Fine Arts. 



To develop a design solution for the re- 
use of the McHenry Theater as a visual 
arts and cultural center for south Balti- 
more. The McHenry dates to 1917 and is 
one of the last original movie palaces in 
Baltimore. 



To renovate the Masonic Temple in 
Washington, D.C., for the National Mu- 
seum of Women in the Arts, which will 
contain a library and research center. 
Slides and a brief report were prepared. 



To research and write a publication on 
the planning, design, construction and 
operation of film theaters. 



For a feasibility study on the museum's 
space utilization and proposed expansion 
program, to be undertaken by Jean Paul 
Carlhlan of the architectural firm 
Shepley Bulfinch Richardson and Ab- 
bott. A feasibility report was issued. 



To conduct a national design competition 
for the expansion of the New Orleans 
Museum of Art. The competition coin- 
cided with the museum's seventy-fifth 
anniversary celebration. Two reports 
were prepared. Support continued for 
this project in FY 1984 under grant 
number 32-4230-00085.9. 



DESIGN FOR THE ARTS 117 



New Orleans Museum of 

Art 

FY 1984 

$26,760 

42-4255-0085 

Conlaci: Director, New 

Orleans Museum of the Art, 

RO. Box 19123, New 

Orleans, LA 71179 



Pennsylvania Academy of 

the Fine Arts 

FY 1982 

$20,000 

22-4250-067 

Conlaci: Director, 

Pennsylvania Academy of 

the Fine Arts, Broad and 

Cherry Streets, 

Philadelphia, PA 19102 



Pierpont Morgan Library 

FY 1979 

$5,000 

92-4211-027 

Conlaci: Assistant Director, 

The Pierpont Morgan 

Library, 29 East 36th 

Street, New York, NY 

10016 



Richland Museum 

FY 1977 

$1,920 

R7(M2-105 

Conlaci: Director, Richland 

Museum, 300 South Church 

Street, Richland Center, Wl 

53581 



Rosenblatt, Arthur L 

FY 1982 

$10,000 

21-4213-106 

Conlaci: Vice-President, 

Architecture and Planning, 

Metropolitan Museum of 

Art, 1158 Fifth Avenue, 

New York, NY 10029 



Southern Ohio Museum 

Corporation 

FY 1979 

$2,500 

92-4211-031 

Conlaci: Manager, Southern 

Ohio Museum Corporation, 

825 Gallia Street, PO. Box 

990, Portsmouth, OH 45662 



For a publication documenting the com- 
petition for the expansion of the New Or- 
leans Museum of Art, including re- 
productions of the finalists' drawings, the 
winning designer's full development of 
the solution and a history of the original 
1910 competition. 



To complete the film A Special Place, a 
documentary of the restoration of the 
Academy Art Museum, a prime example 
of high Victorian architecture. 



To plan and design changes to the 
Pierpont Morgan Library's interior exhi- 
bition spaces and extend its outreach to 
the community. The library's collection 
includes old master drawings, medieval 
and Renaissance manuscripts, autograph 
manuscripts, early printed books and mu- 
sical manuscripts. 



For a landscaping plan for Frank Lloyd 
Wright's A. D. German Warehouse, in- 
tended for use as a cultural facility for 
Richland County, Wisconsin. 



To prepare a book on construction and 
renovation of major art museums in the 
United States and Western Europe. The 
aim was to show the relationship of the 
architecture of new facilities, the art col- 
lections and the environmental systems 
designed to protect the holdings. 



To continue the adaptation of the Secu- 
rity Central National Bank building, a 
historic landmark in Portsmouth, Ohio, 
into a museum and cultural center. This 
phase involved completion of the final 
design and specifications for the mezza- 
nine gallery and third floor. Slides and a 
report were produced. 



Theater Historical Society 

FY 1982 

$45,000 

22-4250-155 

Conlaci: Theater Historical 

Society, PO. Box 101, 

Notre Dame, IN 46556 



Triton Museum of Art 

FY 1982 

$27,500 

22-4230-214 

Contact- Director, Triton 

Museum of Art, 1 505 

Warburton Avenue, Santa 

Clara, CA 95050 



Trustees of the Corcoran 

Gallery of Art 

FY 1981 

$20,000 

12-4230-079 

Conlaci: Director of 

Development, Trustees of 

the Corcoran Gallery of 

Art, 17th Street and New 

York Avenue, N.W., 

Washington, DC 20006 



University of California, 
Santa Barbara 
FY 1983 
$30,000 
32-4230-00069 
Conlaci: Director, 
University Art Museum, 
University of California, 
Santa Barbara, Santa 
Barbara, C A 93106 



The National Mu- 
seum of Women in 
the Arts in Washing- 
ton, D.C., was once a 
Masonic Temple. 
Renovated and 
opened in 1 985. the 
museum has exhi- 
bition space and a 
study center. 



To create a documentary film, American 
Picture Palaces. The film highlights the 
ingenuity with which palace designers in- 
corporated the technical and functional 
necessities of theater operations within 
wildly ornamented interiors. 



To conduct an architectural design com- 
petition for the Triton Museum's capital 
expansion program. The aims of the 
competition were to gain public expo- 
sure, provide for public contributions of 
ideas and offer an opportunity for tal- 
ented but unknown designers to work on 
a significant public project. 



To develop detailed design plans to ac- 
commodate the handicapped within the 
framework of a general plan for the gal- 
lery. 



For an on-site competition for the design 
of an art museum in Santa Barbara. The 
University Art Museum has set aside 
prime space on the campus for a new 
building and has initiated a campaign to 
raise construction and endowment funds. 




118 CHAPTER THREE 



University of Florida 
FY 1984 
$20,000 
42-4257-0068 
Contact: Planning 
Consultant, University of 
Florida. Facilities Planning, 
355 Tigerl Hall, Gainesville, 
FL 32611 



Walker Art Center 
FY 1982 
$20,000 
22-4230-217 
Contact: Administrative 
Director, Walker Art 
Center, Vineland Place, 
Minneapolis, MN 55403 



To conduct a national design competition 
for a museum of fine arts on the Univer- 
sity of Florida campus to house the uni- 
versity's permanent art collection and 
provide space for traveling exhibitions. 



To design an addition to the Walker Art 
Center that incorporates new gallery 
spaces, workshop and office areas. The 
addition was also intended to provide 
links to the Guthrie Theater and to city- 
owned park land opposite the center's en- 
trance. A film and plans on the project 
were produced. 



Community Arts Centers 

Design and planning projects for community-based multi- 
purpose arts and cultural facilities. 



Acadiana Arts Council 

FY 1981 

$2,500 

12-4230-132 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Acadiana Arts Council, 

PO. Box 53762, Lafayette, 

LA 70505 



Alabama State Council on 

the Arts and Humanities 

FY 1979 

$3,000 

92-4211-211 

Contact: Project Director, 

Alabama State Council on 

the Arts and Humanities, 

The Gallagher House, 1 14 

North Hull, Montgomery, 

AL 36130 



Alabama State Council on 

the Arts and Humanities 

FY 1982 

$20,000 

22-4230-208 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Alabama Council on the 

Arts and Humanities, 323 

Adams Avenue, 

Montgomery, AL 36130 



To conduct a feasibility study investigat- 
ing the conversion of the Old Lafayette 
Parish Library into an arts facility. 



To conduct a study on the feasibility of 
building a community arts facility. 



To plan and design a community arts fa- 
cility. 



Albany Area Arts Council 

FY 1987 

$12,900 

87-4251-0013 

Contact: President, Albany 

Area Arts Council, RO. 

Box 308, Albany, NY 

31702 



Appalshop, Inc. 

FY 1978 

$12,500 

R80-42-133 

Contact: Appalshop, Inc., 

RO. Box 743, Whitesburg, 

KY 41858 



Archdiocese of Santa Fe 

FY 1977 

$15,000 

R7a42-ll5 

Contact: Project Director, 

Archdiocese of Santa Fe, 

202 Momingside Drive, 

S.E., Albuquerque, NM 

87108 



Art Awareness, Inc. 

FY 1985 

$6,560 

52-4231-0080 

Contact: President, Art 

Awareness, Inc., Route 42, 

Box 177, Lexington, KY 

12452 



Art Center of Northern 

New Jersey 

FY 1977 

$5,000 

R70-42-67 

Contact: Upsala College, 

Art Building, East Orange, 

N J 07019 



Arts and Crafts Center of 

Pittsburgh, Inc. 

FY 1981 

$8,500 

1 2-4230-005 

Contact: President, Arts and 

Crafts Center of Pittsburgh, 

Inc., Fifth and Shady 

Avenues, Pittsburgh, PA 

15232 



Arts Council, Inc. 

FY 1978 

$6,000 

R80-42-63 

Contact: Arts Council, Inc., 

1202 North Third Street, 

Phoenix, AZ 85004 



To restore the Carnegie Library (built in 
1906 and listed on the National Register 
of Historic Places) and adapt it for use 
as headquarters for the Albany Area 
Arts Council and as office and project 
space for member arts groups. 



To design a training and production cen- 
ter with a multiuse theater to house 
Appalshop's varied programs for the cul- 
tural preservation and expression of 
mountain people in the Appalachian re- 
gion. 



To compile documentation and develop a 
comprehensive plan for preservation and 
revitalization of the historic plaza and 
chapel site of Santa Rosa de Lima at 
Abiquiu, New Mexico. The plan was 
part of an effort to restore the eight- 
eenth-century mission as a community 
cultural center. 



To development a plan to rehabilitate a 
nineteenth-century resort hotel for use as 
a multipurpose art center. A video enti- 
tled "Lexington House in the Heart of 
the Catskills" and a project summary 
were produced. 



To conduct a feasibility study to deter- 
mine probable occupancy, conversion 
costs and operating expenses associated 
with the adaptation of the Engle Street 
High School as a multiuse arts center. 



For a study to define the space needs of 
the Arts and Crafts Center of Pitts- 
burgh. The center has operated for 
thirty-six years from two historic build- 
ings in Mellon Park. A study report, a 
design competition and an exhibition of 
the results were produced. 



For a study to determine the feasibility 
of developing the abandoned Monroe 
School as an arts center. 



DESIGN FOR THE ARTS 119 



Arts Interaction 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

92-4211-135 

Contact: President, Arts 

Interaction, 656 West 181st 

Street, New York, NY 

10033 



Bayfront NATO, Inc. 

FY 1981 

$10,000 

12-4230-017 

Contact: Associate Director, 

BayfrontNATO, Inc., 312 

Chestnut Street, Erie, PA 

16507 



Black Spectrum Theater 

Company 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

92-4211-212 

Contact: Director, Black 

Spectrum Theater 

Company, 205-21 Linden 

Boulevard, Saint Albans, 

NY 11412 



Boston Center for the Arts 

FY 1977 

$20,000 

R70-42-70 

Contact: Boston Center for 

the Arts, 539 Tremont 

Street, Boston, MA 021 16 



Boston Center for the Arts 

FY 1980 

$25,000 

02^251-008 

Contact: President, Boston 

Center for the Arts, 539 

Tremont Street, Boston, 

MA 021 16 



Bowling Green-Warren 

County Arts Commission 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R8(M2-135 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Bowling Green-Warren 

County Arts Commission, 

520 East Main Street, 

Bowling Green. KY 42101 



For architectural planning for the ren- 
ovation of the historic Coliseum Theater 
as a combined community cultural cen- 
ter and indoor commercial mall. 



To prepare a detailed energy-efficient 
architectural design for the Culture 
House, to provide a permanent home to 
Bayfront NATO's program of dance, 
music, theater and visual art. 



To develop a community cultural and 
recreational facility in southeastern 
Queens. 



To continue the development of the Bos- 
ton Center for the Arts, a complex of 
older buildings adapted as studios for 
artists and facilities for visual and per- 
forming arts groups. 



To employ a design task force in the re- 
search and development of adaptive re- 
use plans for the structures that house 
the Boston Center for the Arts. 



To engage in planning and design for the 
renovation of a former vaudeville house 
in downtown Bowling Green, Kentucky, 
as a multipurpose center serving local 
arts groups. 



Buffalo State College 

Alumni Foundation, Inc. 

FY 1977 

$20,000 

R70-42-73 

Contact: President, Buffalo 

State College Alumni 

Foundation, Inc., 1300 

Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, 

NY 14222 



Bullock County Board of 

Education 

FY 1979 

$5,000 

92-4211-005 

Contact: Superintendent, 

Bullock County Board of 

Education. Union Springs, 

AL 36089 



Cambridge Arts Council 

Fund 

FY 1978 

$14,000 

R80-42-136 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Cambridge Arts Council 

Fund, 57 Inman Street, 

Cambridge, MA 02139 



Capitol South Association 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R80-42-137 

Contact: Project 

Coordinator, Capitol South 

Association, 101 East Town 

Street, Columbus, OH 

43215 



City of Athens/Clark 

County 

FY 1980 

$22,000 

02-4230-086 

Contact: Director, Cultural 

Affairs, City of Athens, 

City Hall, Athens, GA 

30601 



City of Dayton 

FY 1977 

$20,000 

R70-42-77 

Contact: Administrator, 

City of Dayton, 101 West 

Third Street, Dayton, OH 

45401 



To advance plans to rehabilitate an un- 
used college auditorium as a community 
multipurpose arts center through a feasi- 
bility study and fund-raising program. 



To renovate an auditorium/gymnasium 
as a visual and performing arts center. 
The auditorium is located on the campus 
of the Bullock County Area Vocational 
Center Campus, long the center of social 
activity in the county. 



For site selection and planning, economic 
feasibility studies and a survey of com- 
munity needs and resources in order to 
establish a multicultural center serving 
the diverse groups and large artist popu- 
lation of Cambridge, Massachusetts. 



To employ technical consultants in light- 
ing, film and video to assist in planning a 
performing and visual arts center in Cap- 
itol South, a multiuse redevelopment 
project in downtown Columbus, Ohio. 



For professional design plans to renovate 
the historic Morton Theater building as a 
community performing arts center and to 
construct an annex to house rehearsal, 
teaching and work spaces. A report and 
other materials were produced. 



To adapt the armory in Dayton, Ohio, as 
a flexible visual arts facility with studios, 
galleries and space for work by invited 
artists. The project was a collaborative 
effort of the city of Dayton, Wright 
State University and the Dayton Art In- 
stitute. 



120 CHAPTER THREE 



City of Fayette 

FY 1981 

$5,000 

12-4230-159 

Contact: Mayor, City of 

Fayette, City Hall, Fayette, 

AL 35555 



City of Florence 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R80-42-2 

Contact: Planning Director, 

City of Florence, City Hall, 

PO. Box 98, Florence, AL 

35630 



City of Hartford 

FY 1981 

$20,000 

12-4230-062 

Contact: City of Hartford, 

Cultural Affairs Office, 550 

Main Street, Hartford, CT 

06103 



City of Minneapolis 
FY 1978 
$20,000 
R80-42-7 
Contact: Director, 
Minneapolis Arts 
Commission, City of 
Minneapolis, 302 City Hall 
Minneapolis, MN 55415 



City of Montgomery 
FY 1981 
$20,000 
12-4230-070 
Contact: Supervisor, 
Department of Cultural 
Affairs, City of 
Montgomery, Montgomery, 
AL 36102 



City of Reading 

FY 1977 

$5,000 

R7a42-103 

Contact: Executive Director, 

City of Reading, 

Redevelopment Authority, 

Reading, PA 19602 



City of Seattle 

FY 1977 

$13,140 

R70-42-79 

Contact: Director, 

Department of Community 

Development. City of 

Seattle, 306 Cherry Street, 

Seattle, WA 98104 



To design the renovation and conversion 
of an old elementary school into usable 
space for the Fayette Art Museum, the 
Little Theater Group and visiting per- 
forming arts attractions. A video on the 
project was created. 



To design the adaptation of a Georgian- 
style home and its auxiliary buildings as 
facilities for the Florence City Arts Com- 
mission. The project was documented in 
slides. 



To renovate a 48,000-square-foot indus- 
trial space in the center city area of 
Hartford for use by Hartford's ballet, 
symphony and chamber orchestra, the 
Connecticut Opera Association and Real 
Art Ways. A fifty-page feasibility study 
was produced. 



To convert the Masonic Temple in down- 
town Minneapolis into an art center 
housing the Cricket Theater, Minnesota 
Dance Theater and School, studio resi- 
dences for artists and first-floor commer- 
cial space. 



To plan and design the adaptive reuse of 
Fort Dixie Graves armory, a former Ala- 
bama National Guard facility, for use as 
a visual and performing arts center for 
the citizens of Montgomery. 



To embark on a structural feasibility 
study to investigate restoring the Astor 
Theater as a cultural facility for Berks 
County, Pennsylvania. 



To complete design studies and plans for 
the adaptation of Seattle's Odd Fellows 
Hall as an arts center. The Seattle Art- 
ists' Housing Handbook, a thirty-eight- 
page booklet, was also produced. 



City of Thomasville 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

92-4211-228 

Contact: Mayor, City of 

Thomasville, City Hall, 

Thomasville, GA 31792 



City of Trenton 

FY 1979 

$5,000 

92-4211-012 

Contact: Principal Planner, 

City of Trenton, 

Department of Planning and 

Development, Trenton, NJ 

08618 



Committee to Secure a 

Westside Community 

Center for the Performing 

Arts 

FY 1977 

$9,980 

R70-42-84 

Contact: Westside 

Community Center, 291 

West Eighth Avenue, 

Eugene, OR 97402 



Community Arts and Media 

Center Inc. 

FY 1977 

$10,650 

R70-42-83 

Contact: Project Director, 

Community Arts and Media 

Center, 77 College Street, 

Burlington, VT 05401 



Council for the Arts in 

Westchester, Inc. 

FY 1978 

$9,500 

R80-42-69 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Council for the Arts, White 

Plains Armory, White 

Plains, NY 10606 



Crossroads Community 

(The Farm) 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R70-42-85 

Contact: Project Director, 

The Farm, 1 499 Potrero 

Avenue, San Francisco, CA 

94110 



To engage in research, planning, and de- 
sign for the conversion of the vacant East 
Side Elementary School into a cultural 
center and to prepare a preliminary de- 
sign for an exhibition pavilion. Three re- 
ports were issued. 



To conduct a feasibility study for a vi- 
sual arts center to provide a focal point 
for Trenton-area artists and for institu- 
tions offering art instruction. 



To renovate and expand the Community 
Center for the Arts building in Eugene, 
Oregon, including design of a main hall 
to accommodate a wide variety of perfor- 
mance activities and renovation of the 
lobby. 



To formulate design plans for an arts and 
media center and to undertake an assess- 
ment of arts facility needs in Burlington, 
Vermont. The study resulted in a pro- 
posal to convert a seventy-year-old build- 
ing in the downtown to a cultural center. 



To determine internal structural renova- 
tions necessary for the reuse of the 
White Plains armory as an urban arts 
center. A report on a music hall for 
Tarrytown, New York, was also pro- 
duced. 



To provide architectural and landscape 
design services as part of the continued 
development of The Farm as a unique 
multicultural setting for the arts. 



DESIGN FOR THE ARTS 121 



Davis Art Center 
FY 1981 
$15,000 
1 2-4230-245 
Contact: Chair, 
Architecture Committee, 
Davis Art Center, 234 J 
Street, Davis, CA 95616 



East Los Angeles 

Community Union 

FY 1981 

$20,000 

1 2-4230-056 

Contact: Project Director, 

East Los Angeles 

Community Union, 5327 

Valley Boulevard, Los 

Angeles, CA 90032 



El Museo del Barrio 
FY 1981 
$10,000 
12-4230-157 
Contact: Designer, El 
Museo del Barrio, 1230 
Fifth Avenue, New York, 
NY 10029 



Empty Space Association 
FY 1981 
$30,000 
12-4230-158 
Contact: Managing 
Director, Empty Space 
Association, 919 East Pike 
Street, Seattle, WA 98122 



Fargo-Moorhead Heritage 

and Cultural Interpretive 

Center 

FY 1977 

$20,000 

R7a42-89 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Fargo-Moorhead Heritage 

and Cultural Interpretive 

Center, PO Box 244, 

Fargo, ND 58102 



Fort Mason Foundation 

FY 1979 

$15,393 

92-4211-218 

Contact: Director, Fort 

Mason Foundation, "A" 

Laguna Marina Boulevard, 

San Francisco, CA 94123 



For a barrier-free design for an arts facil- 
ity that utilizes alternative forms of en- 
ergy. The aims were to provide a central 
location for the arts, a permanent struc- 
ture dedicated to the expansion and 
appreciation of the arts and a model for 
other communities. The project was 
documented in slides. 



To plan and design the renovation of the 
Vega Building, a historic art deco the- 
ater, for use as a multicultural arts cen- 
ter serving local, national and interna- 
tional performing arts groups. 



To prepare designs for the expansion and 
conversion of an 1 885 Napoleon le Brun 
firehouse to meet the growing needs of 
El Museo's theater and art school. 



To integrate a theater space into a 
multiuse complex in the Denny Regrade, 
a central area of Seattle which is the ob- 
ject of long-term urban redevelopment. 



For architectural designs for a proposed 
multidisciplinary arts facility integrated 
with a vehicular bridge spanning the Red 
River of the North and connecting the 
cities of Moorhead, Minnesota, and 
Fargo, North Dakota. 



To host an architectural competition for 
a master plan for the development of 
Fort Mason as an arts facility. The Fort 
Mason Center, located on the San Fran- 
cisco waterfront and a part of the Golden 
Gate National Recreation Area, was for- 
merly an Army base. 



Friends of the Library 

FY 1982 

$5,388 

22-4230-223 

Contact: President, Friends 

of the Library, 91 5 Talbot 

Road, Thibodaux, LA 

70301 



Galveston County Cultural 

Arts Council, Inc. 

FY 1977 

$17,515 

R70-42-91 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Galveston County Cultural 

Arts Council, RO. Box 

1105, Galveston, TX 77553 



Greater Portland Arts 

Council 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R70-42-92 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Building Commission, 

Greater Portland Arts 

Council, One Monument 

Square, Portland, ME 

04111 



Grove House, Inc. 

FY 1978 

$6,000 

R80-42-6 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Grove House, Inc., 3496 

Main Highway, Coconut 

Grove, FL 33133 



Hawaii Loa College/ 
Windward Arts 
FY 1981 
$20,000 
1 2-4230-063 
Contact: President, 
Windward Community Arts 
Council, PO. Box 764, 
Kaneohe, Oahu. HI 06744 



Hawaii State Foundation on 

Culture and the Arts 

FY 1979 

$2,500 

92-4211-254 

Contact: Chairman, East 

Hawaii Cultural Council, 

250 South King Street, 

Kamamulu Building. Room 

310, Honolulu, HI 96813 



To develop a charette focusing on design 
solutions for the renovation of a turn-of- 
the-century building as a multipurpose 
community arts and cultural center. A 
five-day planning festival was held. The 
project demonstrated how a public de- 
sign process can aid in garnering support 
for such a facility. 



To develop the hotel space of Galveston's 
1894 Grand Opera House for stage sup- 
port facilities, artists' living and teaching 
studios and civic center uses. A develop- 
ment plan and an economic analysis were 
produced. 



To investigate the adaptive reuse of the 
Milk Street Armory as an arts center for 
visual and performing arts organizations 
serving southwestern Maine. 



For architectural assistance in the ren- 
ovation of a space to expand the activi- 
ties of Grove House, a nonprofit cooper- 
ative for Florida artists and craftsmen. 



To plan and design a community arts 
center, to be developed for and by the 
Windward Community Arts Council, the 
Hawaii Loa College community and 
other civic and arts-oriented groups on 
Oahu. 



To plan and design the adaptive reuse of 
the former district courthouse and police 
station building as an arts and cultural 
center. Both city and stale legislatures 
gave their support to the project. 



122 CHAPTER THREE 



Historic Seattle 
Preservation and 
Development Authority 
FY 1982 
$24,080 
22-4230007 

Contact: Executive Director, 
Historic Seattle 
Preservation and 
Development Authority, 215 
Second Avenue, Seattle, 
WA 98104 



Idaho Commission on the 

Arts 

FY 1987 

$5,000 

87-4251-0019 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Idaho Commission on the 

Arts, c/o Statehouse Mall, 

304 West State Street, 

Boise, ID 83720 



Insular Arts Council 

FY 1982 

$20,000 

22^230-199 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Insular Arts Council, Office 

of the Governor, P.O. Box 

2950, Agana.GU 96910 



Johnstown Area Arts 

Council 

FY 1979 

$15,030 

92-4211-221 

Contact: Project Director, 

Johnstown Area Arts 

Council, PO. Box 402, 

Johnstown, PA 1 5907 



Lander College 

FY 1979 

$7,500 

92-4211-023 

Contact: Vice-President for 

College Relations, Lander 

College, Greenwood, SC 

29646 



Maryland Hall for the 

Creative Arts, Inc. 

FY 1982 

$20,000 

22-4230-201 

Contact: President, 

Maryland Hall for the 

Creative Arts, Inc., PO. 

Box 188, Annapolis, MD 

21404 



To redesign and adapt the Good Shep- 
herd Center as a multipurpose faciUty 
for artists and residents of the commu- 
nity. The study supplied feasibility data 
and focused on the physical use of the 
vacant upper floors by theater, dance 
and music organizations. 



To restore the Alexander House, the 
1 897 home of Moses Alexander, the first 
Jewish governor elected in the United 
States. The Idaho Commission on the 
Arts has occupied the house since 1977. 
The aims were to return it the original 
Queen Anne style while rendering it 
more suitable for office space. 



For design and planning of a cultural fa- 
cility on Guam. The project served as a 
symbolic rallying point for arts activity 
and received strong support from local 
government and the private sector. A 
brief report was prepared. 



To prepare a feasibility study for the 
conversion of Johnstown Central High 
School into a multiuse facility to serve as 
the nucleus of a regional art center. 
Upon completion of the study the city of 
Johnstown and Johnstown School Board 
endorsed the project and initiated a 
search for construction funds. 



To plan and design a multipurpose re- 
gional arts center at Lander College to 
serve the upper Savannah area. 



To develop a master plan for the adap- 
tive reuse of a former high school as a 
home for the arts. Existing facilities in 
the Maryland capital area do not satisfy 
the basic requirements of most perform- 
ing groups. A development plan report 
was produced. 



Minority Arts Resource 

Council 

FY 1984 

$25,000 

42-4231-0037 

Contact: Executive Director. 

Minority Arts Resource 

Council, 4909 Wayne 

Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 

19144 



Monmouth County Arts 

Council 

FY 1981 

$15,000 

12-4230-163 

Contact: Project Supervisor, 

Monmouth Arts Center, 99 

Monmouth Street, Red 

Bank, NJ 07701 



Moore, Steven A. 

FY 1983 

$10,000 

3M213-00015 

Contact: Partner, Moore/ 

Weinrich Architects, 49 

Pleasant Street, Brunswick, 

ME 04011 



Municipality of Mayaguez 

FY 1978 

$14,000 

R80-42-75 

Contact: Vice-Mayor, 

Municipality of Mayaguez, 

Casa Alcaldia, Mayaguez, 

PR 99708 



New York Art Theater 

Institute 

FY 1981 

$8,000 

12-4230-165 

Contact: Executive Director, 

New York Art Theater 

Institute, 116 East 14th 

Street, New York, NY 

10003 



New York City Hispanic- 
American Dance Company 
FY 1979 
$3,500 
92-4211-025 

Contact: President, New 
York City Hispanic- 
American Dance Company, 
167 West 89th Street, New 
York, NY 10024 



To plan and design an arts center to 
serve the needs of minority groups in the 
Philadelphia area. The proposed location 
was a historic landmark four-story school 
building in the Germantown section of 
Philadelphia. Drawings and slides were 
produced. 



To plan the restoration of the Monmouth 
Arts Center, built in 1926 as a vaudeville 
house and later used as a community 
performance center. 



To produce an architectural design study 
for a regional arts facility housing per- 
forming arts groups and visual artists. 
The aims were to provide a high profile 
for the arts in the community and em- 
phasize collaborations between the per- 
forming groups and visual artists. Photo- 
graphs and a report were produced. 



To devise a restoration plan for the 
Yaguez Theater in order to continue its 
operation as a cultural center and theater 
for the western region of Puerto Rico. 



To create schematic designs of simple 
ways to transform museums, public 
parks, schools, bus terminals and other 
spaces to accommodate an unusual mix 
of visual arts, literature and theater 
presentations. 



To conduct a cost feasibility study and to 
prepare preliminary architectural 
drawings in connection with the renova- 
tion of the New York City Hispanic- 
American Dance Company's existing fa- 
cility. 



DESIGN FOR THE ARTS 123 



Northcoast Arts, Inc. 
FY 1978 
$15,000 
R8a42-142 
Contact: Producing 
Director, Northcoast Arts, 
Inc., 987 F Street, Areata, 
CA 95521 



Ogilvie, Philip W. 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

91-4232-260 

Contact: 30 Seventh Street, 

N.E., Washington, DC 

20002 



Oroville Community Center 

Committee, Inc. 

FY 1982 

$10,000 

22^230-206 

Contact: President, Oroville 

Community Center 

Committee, Inc., 2 Adelaide 

Way, Oroville, CA 95965 



Painted Bride Art Center, 

Inc. 

FY 1986 

$9,000 

86-4231-0072 

Contact: Director of 

Development, Painted Bride 

Art Center, Inc., 230 Vine 

Street, Philadelphia, PA 

19106 



Philadelphia College of Art 
FY 1980 
$17,500 
02-4230-074 
Contact: President, 
Philadelphia College of Art, 
Broad and Pine Streets, 
Philadelphia, PA 19102 



Pioneer Patrons Foundation, 

Inc. 

FY 1978 

$6,000 

R8(M2-10 

Contact: Pioneer Patrons 

Foundation, Inc., University 

of Wisconsin, Plattesville, 

420 Karemann Library, 

Plattesville, WI 53815 



To conduct design and feasibility studies 
investigating the conversion of two barns 
into a cultural center, with performance 
space, artists' studio and a gallery. A re- 
port on the Pacific Arts Center was pro- 
duced. 



To plan the remodeling of the former 
Lansburgh's department store as home to 
the Washington Humanities and Arts 
Center. A thirty-page report was issued. 



To prepare the architectural design of a 
performing arts and multiuse community 
center in Oroville, California. A site for 
the center was donated by the city. A de- 
sign report was produced. 



To design and construct a new two-story 
gallery and lobby as part of the adapta- 
tion of an industrial building as an arts 
complex. The entrance was designed for 
outdoor cameo performances. 



To plan and design the renovation and 
restoration of the Haviland building as a 
multiuse community cultural facility. 
The building is a nationally registered 
historic landmark on the urban campus. 



To prepare a preliminary design of a uni- 
versity and community arts facility to 
house both the visual arts and the per- 
forming arts. 



Pioneer Square Performing 

Arts Association 

FY 1982 

$10,000 

22-4230-207 

Contact: Board of Directors, 

Pioneer Square Performing 

Arts Association, 306 Saint 

Charles Hotel Building, 85 

South Washington, Seattle, 

WA 98104 



Potrero Hill Neighborhood 

House 

FY 1979 

$2,000 

92-4211-026 

Contact: Project Director, 

Potrero Hill Neighborhood 

House, 953 De Haro Street, 

San Francisco, CA 94107 



Rensselaer County Council 

for the Arts 

FY 1977 

$5,995 

R70-42-104 

Contact: Treasurer, 

Rensselaer County Council 

for the Arts, 1 89 Second 

Street, Troy, NY 12180 



Sierra Arts Foundation 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R80-42-79 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Sierra Arts Foundation, 

P.O. Box2814, Reno, NV 

89505 



Sooner Theater of Norman, 

Inc. 

FY 1977 

$5,025 

R70-42-I08 

Contact: Professor of 

Architecture, Sooner 

Theater of Norman, Inc., 

University of Oklahoma, 

2500 South McGee Drive, 

Norman, OK 73069 



Spectrum/Focus on Deaf 

Artists 

FY 1980 

$27,940 

02-4251-015 

Contact: President, 

Spectrum/Focus on Deaf 

Artists, PO. Box 339, 

Austin, TX 78767 



To formulate architectural designs for 
the reuse of a historic firehouse for cul- 
tural and commercial activities. 



To plan the restoration and improvement 
of the landmark Potrero Hill Neighbor- 
hood House, designed by Julia Morgan. 
The demand for small, flexible perform- 
ing spaces has become intense in San 
Francisco, and Potrero Hill has the high- 
est concentration of working artists of 
any San Francisco neighborhood. 



To frame architectural plans and develop 
fund-raising materials for the renovation 
of a landmark townhouse for the Rensse- 
laer County Council for the Arts. A 
fifty-page program description was pro- 
duced. 



To create design plans for a cultural cen- 
ter in Reno, Nevada, to include an art 
museum, theater, rehearsal space, and 
classrooms. A 200-page report, the 5/- 
erra Center Program, was issued. 



To conduct economic and design feasibil- 
ity studies to investigate the restoration 
and conversion of the Sooner Theater as 
a community arts facility serving theater, 
music and dance in Norman, Oklahoma. 
Slides and an engineering report were 
produced. 



To arrange seminars and workshops for 
architects and deaf artists. The goal was 
to impart an understanding of the 
uniqueness of the design process and how 
it can help meet the needs of deaf artists. 



124 CHAPTER THREE 



SSAC, Inc. 

FY 1977 

$20,000 

R7042-1IO 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Arts and Science Council, 

SSAC. Inc.. 110 East 

Seventh Street, Charlotte, 

NC 28202 



Syracuse Area Landmarks 
Theater. Inc. 
FY 1977 
$5,000 
R7a42-1 1 1 
Contact: President, 
Syracuse Area Landmarks 
Theater. Inc., One Mony 
Plaza, Syracuse, NY 13202 



Theater for the New City 

Foundation, Inc. 

FY 1987 

$30,000 

87-4251-0123 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Theater for the New City 

Foundation, Inc., 155 First 

Avenue. New York, NY 

10003 



Town of Smithtown 

FY 1977 

$7,500 

R70-42-112 

Contact: Executive Director. 

Smithtown Township Arts 

Council. Smithtown. NY 

11787 



Town of Wise 

FY 1977 

$5,000 

R7042-113 

Contact: Project Director, 

Town of Wise, PO. Box 

1100, Wise, VA 24293 



United Arts Council of 

Greensboro. Inc. 

FY 1986 

$35,000 

86-4257-0178 

Contact: President. United 

Arts Council of Greensboro, 

Inc., 200 North Davie 

Street, Greensboro, NC 

27401 



To engage consultants in theater design, 
acoustics, and lighting to establish re- 
quirements for the restoration of Spirit 
Square's historic Baptist church and ad- 
joining buildings as a community center. 



To conduct feasibility studies for restora- 
tion of the historic Loew's State movie 
palace as a performing arts facility and 
museum. 



To produce a design for the First Avenue 
WPA Retail Market (located in New 
York City's East Village) to transform it 
into a community-based cultural center, 
including theaters, rehearsal spaces, a 
restaurant and galleries. 



To conduct architectural and economic 
studies to explore the restoration and ad- 
aptation of a landmark house as an arts 
center and headquarters for the 
Smithtown Township Arts Council. 



To engage in architectural planning for 
an arts facility for the town of Wise, Vir- 
ginia. 



To host an invitational design compe- 
tition to expand the Greensboro Arts 
Center into a multifunctional civic and 
cultural complex and an anchor for re- 
vitalization efforts in downtown Greens- 
boro. 



Village of Cambridge 

FY 1977 

$5,550 

R70-42-114 

Contact: Project Director, 

Arts Program, Village of 

Cambridge, Cambridge. 

NY 12816 



Washington Project for the 

Arts 

FY 1980 

$4,000 

02-4230-103 

Contact: Assistant Director, 

Washington Project for the 

Arts, 1227 G Street, N.W.. 

Washington, DC 20005 



Washington Project for the 

Arts 

FY 1986 

$29,600 

86-4231-0067 

Contact: Director of 

Development. Washington 

Project for the Arts. 400 

Seventh Street. N.W., 

Washington, DC 20004 



William Bonifas Fine Arts 

Center, Inc. 

FY 1987 

$7,500 

87-4251-0077 

Contact: President, William 

Bonifas Fine Arts Center, 

Inc., 700 First Avenue, 

South, Escanaba, MI 49829 



World Monuments Fund, 

Inc. 

FY 1986 

$10,000 

86^231-0008 

Contact: Chairman, World 

Monuments Fund, Inc., 39 

East 78th Street, New 

York, NY 10021 



To conduct architectural studies of an 
1 878 opera house and building to deter- 
mine the feasibility of their adaptation 
for professional and community arts ac- 
tivities. 



To undertake a feasibility study to deter- 
mine the space needs and location alter- 
natives for the Washington Project for 
the Arts. The aim was to address the 
problem of artists and organizations who 
have pioneered revitalization being dis- 
placed by development. 



To convert the atrium in the art center 
into a functional space incorporating the 
work of two artists. 



To redesign the interior of the William 
Bonifas Fine Arts Center, a former Cath- 
olic school gymnasium and auditorium 
and the only comprehensive arts center 
in Michigan's Upper Peninsula. 



To research and develop a plan for the 
adaptation of the Middleton-Pinckney 
Mansion, an eighteenth-century land- 
mark in Charleston, South Carolina, as ; 
community arts center providing perfor- 
mance and exhibition areas and office 
space for the Spoleto Festival. 



DESIGN FOR THE ARTS 125 



Collaborations in Design, Art and 
Architecture 

Interdisciplinary collaborative projects, especially art in 
public places, and studies of architecture as public art. 



Albright College 

FY 1987 

$43,350 

87-4l7(M)458 

Contact: President, Albright 

College, PO. Box 15234, 

Reading. PA 19612 



American Craft Council 

FY 1986 

$50,000 

86-4256-0087 

Contact: Executive Director, 

American Craft Council, 

401 Park Avenue South, 

New York, NY 10016 



Architectural League of 

New York 

FY 1979 

$30,000 

92-4212-257 

Contact: Project Director, 

Architectural League of 

New York, 41 East 65th 

Street, New York, NY 

10021 



Architectural League of 

New York 

FY 1980 

$20,000 

02-4250-108 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Architectural League of 

New York, 41 East 65th 

Street, New York, NY 

10021 



Architectural League of 

New York 

FY 1981 

$5,000 

12-4250-151 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Architectural League of 

New York, 457 Madison 

Avenue, New York, NY 

10022 



For a collaborative design effort between 
artist Mary Miss and architect Adele 
Santos for the outdoor environment sur- 
rounding the Albright College's newly 
planned Center for the Arts. The collabo- 
ration was intended to create a sense of 
place and focus, in harmony with the 
new center. (Design Arts/Visual Arts 
Collaboration.) 



To examine the integration of architec- 
ture and crafts in an exhibit focusing on 
the collaborations of architects and mas- 
ter craftsmen working in such mediums 
as clay, fiber, glass, metal and wood be- 
tween 1890 to 1925. One aim was to 
show how craftsmen are relearning old 
processes. 



To produce a major exhibition and book 
documenting the relationships between 
architecture and allied arts in the United 
States. 



To produce a traveling exhibition enti- 
tled Art and Architecture: The History 
and Future of the Collaboration. The ex- 
hibition covered past and present 
projects, and gave a glimpse of future 
possibilities through collaborative archi- 
tect-artist demonstration projects. A 
$20,000 amendment, grant number 1 2- 
4250-9002, was made in 1981. 



To complete the exhibition and cata- 
logue. Collaboration: Artists & Archi- 
tects. Contributors to the exhibition in- 
cluded Cesar Pelli, Stanley Rigerman, 
Richard Haas, Charles Moore, Richard 
Serra and Hugh Hardy. The catalogue 
was published in 1981 and was edited by 
Barbaralee Diamonstein. 



Association of Hispanic 

Arts, Inc. 

FY 1987 

$17,500 

87-4251-0081 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Association of Hispanic 

Arts, Inc, 200 East 87th 

Street, Second Floor, New 

York, NY 10028 



Cambridge Arts Council 

Foundation 

FY 1978 

$20,000 

R80-42-99 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Cambridge Arts Council 

Foundation, City Hall, 

Cambridge, MA 02139 



Cedar Rapids-Marion Arts 

Council 

FY 1985 

$4,600 

52-4231-0083 

Contact: President, Cedar 

Rapids-Marion Arts 

Council, PO. Box 4860, 

Cedar Rapids, lA 52407 



Ching, Francis D. K. 

FY 1981 

$8,500 

11-4213-086 

Contact: 4652 First Avenue, 

N.E., Seattle, WA 98105 



City of Boston 

FY 1979 

$12,850 

92-4233-175 

Contact: Project Director, 

Faneuil Hall, Boston, MA 

02109 



City of Concord 

FY 1986 

$6,000 

86-4231-0066 

Contact: Director of Leisure 

Services, City of Concord, 

1950 Parkside Drive, 

Concord, CA 94519 



To support a designer-artist collaboration 
on a public art project in the courtyard 
of the Hecksher Building at Fifth Ave- 
nue and 104th Street in New York City. 
The aim was to create an environment 
inspired by traditional Puerto Rican pla- 
zas to honor Julia de Burgos, a Hispanic 
poet. 



For Arts on the Line, a program involv- 
ing artists in the planning, design and 
execution of improvements to urban open 
spaces. The program served as a catalyst 
for continued work incorporating art into 
planning processes. 



To hire a designer-artist collaborative 
team to frame recommendations for a 
master plan for urban design and public 
art in downtown Cedar Rapids, including 
downtown and outlying spaces, plazas, 
parks, streets and transportation systems. 



To produce a series of animated films 
that promote a better understanding of 
the art of architecture and of our built 
environment. 



To develop an information package, enti- 
tled "Boston Passport," concerning all 
the public works of art under city man- 
agement. 



For the design of four "places as art"on 
sites designated by the city's urban de- 
sign plan. Design teams consisting of a 
visual artist and a landscape architect 
created models for each site and pre- 
sented these in a public forum. 



126 CHAPTER THREE 



City of Concord 

FY 1987 

$28,500 

87-4170-0004 

Contact: City of Concord, 

1950 Parkside Drive, 

Concord, CA 94519 



City of Jersey City 

FY 1977 

$9,980 

R70-42-65C 

Contact: Director, Tenant 

Organizations, City of 

Jersey City, 514 Newark 

Avenue, Jersey City, NJ 

07306 



City of New Orleans 

FY 1979 

$29,870 

92-4233-180 

Contact: Coordinator, 

Human Affairs Program, 

City Hall, 1300 Perdido 

Street, New Orleans, LA 

70112 



City of Oakland 

FY 1981 

$25,000 

12-4230-166 

Contact: Director of City 

Planning, City of Oakland, 

1 4th and Jefferson Streets, 

Oakland, CA 94612 



City of Richmond, Indiana 

FY 1987 

$21,750 

87-4170-0459 

Contact: Superintendent, 

City of Richmond, Parks 

and Recreation Department, 

Richmond, IN 47374 



Committee for Astor Place 

FY 1981 

$15,000 

12-4230-052 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Committee for Astor Place, 

51 Astor Place, New York, 

NY 10003 



For an open statewide competition to de- 
velop a landscape design and artwork for 
Todos Santos Plaza, a two-acre site that 
has been the focus of Concord, Califor- 
nia, since the community's founding 120 
years ago. The aim was to maintain the 
plaza's traditional small town scale, as 
well as to make a work of art of the 
plaza itself. (Design Arts/ Visual Arts 
Collaboration.) 



For design and execution of a mural and 
a series of building entrance identifica- 
tion symbols by a young tenant-artist. 
The work formed part of site improve- 
ments for the A. Harry Moore public 
housing project in Jersey City and was 
documented in photos and slides. 



For a design study and competition to 
transform Duncan Plaza into a sculpture 
garden. A $10,000 amendment was 
made in 1981 to print and distribute ad- 
ditional copies of the proposal for the 
Duncan Plaza Sculpture Park and for 
professional advice and documentation of 
the competition. 



To plan and design a public sculpture 
garden and tideline urban park in Chan- 
nel Park, a link between the urban areas 
of Lake Merritt and the Embarcadero. 
Cost estimates, specifications and a 200- 
page report were issued. 



To develop a plan to revitalize the 
Whitewater River Gorge through a 
collaboration between artist James 
Turrell and architect Evans Woollen. 
The gorge bisects the city of Richmond 
and features steep cliffs and flood plains, 
as well as buildings linked to the early 
history of recorded music and jazz. (De- 
sign Arts/Visual Arts Collaboration.) 



To refurbish a special public work of art 
and design — the ceramic tile floor of the 
Astor Place subway in Manhattan. This 
subway station, built in 1904, is a main 
transit link to the thriving urban cultural 
hub. Slides and a report entitled Culture 
Stations documented the project. 



Cooper Union for the 

Advancement of Science 

and Art 

FY 1981 

$15,050 

12-4250-150 

Contact: President, Cooper 

Union for the Advancement 

of Science and Art, 41 

Cooper Square, New York, 

NY 10003 



Creative Time, Inc. 
FY 1986 
$36,000 
86-4231-0164 
Contact: Director of 
Development, Creative 
Time, Inc., 66 West 
Broadway, New York, NY 
10007 



Creative Time, Inc. 

FY 1987 

$35,375 

87-4170-0005 

Contact: Creative Time, 

Inc., 66 West Broadway, 

New York, NY 10007 



Dayton Art Institute 

FY 1987 

$25,000 

87-4251-0117 

Contact: Director, Dayton 

Art Institute, PO. Box 941, 

Dayton, OH 45401 



Department of 

Environmental Management 

FY 1987 

$20,000 

87-4170-0006 

Contact: Department of 

Environmental 

Management, 100 

Cambridge Street, Boston, 

MA 02202 



For a photographic exhibit and a book. 
The Obvious Illusion: Murals from the 
Lower East Side. The paintings have 
been inspired and produced by the pre- 
dominantly Puerto Rican population of 
the area, and they reflect the group's cul- 
tural background. The book was pub- 
lished in 1980. 



To create nine temporary collaborative 
projects at Hunter's Point in Queens, 
New York. The aims were to address 
new issues in public art and expand on 
Creative Time's Art on the Beach series, 
a laboratory where architects, landscape 
architects, urban designers and designers 
work with performing and visual artists 
to develop site-specific projects. 



For the planning phase of a collaborative 
effort among architects Tod Williams 
and Billie Tsien and visual artist Jackie 
Ferrara. The aim was to transform Hunt- 
er's Point, a landfill site on the East 
River in Queens, New York, into a pub- 
lic park that provides space for Creative 
Time's programming and other commu- 
nity arts uses. (Design Arts/Visual Arts 
Collaboration.) 



To support a two-year regional tour of an 
exhibition of recent public art projects 
created through collaborations of artists, 
designers and communities. The purpose 
of the exhibition was to communicate the 
benefits of such collaborations in the de- 
sign of the urban built environment and 
to increase understanding of the nature 
of site-specific public art. 



For a collaboration among artists and a 
landscape architect for the design of a 
riverside promenade and the creation of 
an art master plan for the historic core of 
Lawrence, Massachusetts. The city was 
the site of the Bread and Roses Strike of 
1912, and one aim of the project was to 
celebrate Lawrence's history. (Design 
Arts/Visual Arts Collaboration.) 



DESIGN FOR THE ARTS 127 



Fairmont Park Art 

Association 

FY 1981 

$7,500 

12-4230-221 

Contact: Project Director, 

Fairmont Park Art 

Association, 256 16th 

Street, Philadelphia, PA 

19102 



GAME, Inc. 

FY 1982 

$24,800 

22-4250-137 

Contact: Director, GAME, 

Inc. (Growth Through Art 

and Museum Experience), 

314 West 54th Street, New 

York, NY 10019 



GAME, Inc. 

FY 1985 

$5,000 

52-4231-0021 

Contact: Director, GAME, 

Inc., 314 West 54th Street, 

New York, NY 10019 



Gowan, Albert J. 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R81-42-11N 

Contact: Massachusetts 

College of Art, 364 

Brookline Avenue, Boston, 

MA 02215 



Greene, Herb 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R71-42-44N 

Contact: University of 

Kentucky, College of 

Architecture, Pence Hall, 

Lexington, KY 40506 



Greene, Herb 

FY 1982 

$15,000 

21-4215-163 

Contact: 1218 Queens 

Road, Berkeley, CA 74708 



To commission proposals and projects by 
artists and architects as part of a project 
exploring new approaches to public art. 
The works were planned for the celebra- 
tion of Philadelphia's Tricentennial and 
included newsstands, bus shelters, out- 
door lighting, street furniture and play 
areas. The project was conducted jointly 
with the National Endowment for the 
Arts, Visual Arts Program. 



To conduct a design awareness program 
entitled Art and Architecture: A Cele- 
bration of Life. The project included stu- 
dent field trips to analyze contemporary 
building design, participatory design 
workshops with children and museum 
personnel and an exhibit of students' 
architectural scale models. 



To design a prototypical architectural 
structure for a Manhattan rooftop that 
houses a reflective light environment of 
mirrors and prisms and projects kaleido- 
scopic spectrums onto the dense steam 
generated by a utility company smoke- 
stack. 



To prepare Nuts & Bolts: Case Studies 
in Public Design. The book features pub- 
lic art and design projects of the Cam- 
bridge Arts Council and of other cities 
across the country. The case studies de- 
tail the motivation, process, costs and im- 
plementation strategies that brought the 
projects to fruition. 



To complete and publish a book. Build- 
ing to Last: Architecture as Ongoing 
Art, on reintegration of art and architec- 
ture. The book was published in 1981 by 
the Architectural Book Publishing Com- 
pany and was coauthored by the grantee 
and Nanine Hilliard Greene. 



For a series of seminars on the images of 
an architecture presented in the book 
Building to Last: Architecture as Ongo- 
ing Art. The book calls for a collabora- 
tion between architects, artists and citi- 
zen craftspersons to create buildings that 
foster public loyalty and gain historic 
meaning in the process of coming into 
being. 



Headlands Art Center 
FY 1987 
$11,000 
87-4170-0003 
Contact: Headlands Art 
Center, 944 Fort Barry, 
Sausalito, CA 94965 



Institute for Art and Urban 

Resources 

FY 1977 

$12,000 

R70-42-159 

Contact: Institute for Art 

and Urban Resources, The 

Clocktower, 108 Leonard 

Street, New York, NY 

10013 



Johnson, Linda N. 

FY 1987 

$9,750 

87-4216-0144 

Contact: Arizona State 

University, Department of 

Design, Tempe, AZ 85287 



Prince, Keiko 

FY 1983 

$10,000 

31-4213-00157 

Contact: 34 Sherman Street, 

Cambridge, MA 02138 



Lyndon, Alice A. 

FY 1981 

$5,000 

11-4213-096 

Contact: 27 1 7 Russell 

Street, Berkeley, CA 94705 



Marshall, Philip C. 

FY 1987 

$9,700 

87-4216-0145 

Contact: 240 Palmer Street. 

New Bedford, MA 02740 



For a collaboration between artist David 
Ireland and architect Mark Mack on the 
design of furnishings for Headlands Art 
Center, a multimedia art facility. The 
furniture designed by the artist-architect 
team was intended as seating for public 
events and as prototypes for manufac- 
ture. (Design Arts/Visual Arts Collabo- 
ration.) 



To produce an exhibition focusing on the 
rebuilding of five abandoned rowhouses 
in New York City by artists whose work 
makes aesthetic statements through the 
alteration of existing architectural form. 



To prepare a publication documenting 
and illustrating the stenciled ornamenta- 
tion on the ceilings and interior walls of 
the Iowa State Capitol. This work is an 
excellent example of Victorian-era crafts- 
manship as it was interpreted in the Mid- 
west. 



For research and site design for Harbor 
Theater, an environmental art project in 
Boston Harbor. The piece consisted of 
five elements: Sun Theater, Airpool, 
High Noon, Tide Optics and Wind Wire. 



To produce a report, lecture and maga- 
zine articles defining public space, the 
kinds of art found in those spaces, the 
impact of cars and electronic media on 
public art and the privatization of the 
public realm by photographs. The series 
was entitled The Privateness of Public 
Art. 



To study the 1 50-year-old tradition of 
artistry in the Barre, Vermont, granite 
industry. Little has been done to docu- 
ment this craft and the public sculpture, 
architectural ornament and cemetery 
statuary it produced. 



128 CHAPTER THREE 



Metropolitan Service 

District 

FY 1987 

$50,000 

87-4170^460 

Contact: Executive Officer, 

Metropolitan Service 

District, 2000 S.W. First 

Avenue, Portland, OR 

97202 



Minneapolis Society of Fine 

Arts 

FY 1982 

$15,370 

22-4250-116 

Contact: Minneapolis 

Society of Fine Arts, 1 33 

East 25th Street, 

Minneapolis, MN 55404 



Municipal Art Society 
FY 1984 
$30,000 
42-4256-0084 
Contact: President, 
Municipal Art Society, 457 
Madison Avenue, New 
York, NY 10022 



New Wilderness Foundation 

FY 1979 

$11,000 

92-4233-189 

Contact: Cooper Square 

Committee, 365 West End 

Avenue, New York, NY 

10024 



New York Foundation for 

the Arts 

FY 1986 

$25,000 

86-4256-0091 

Contact: Director, Artists' 

Sponsorship Programs, New 

York Foundation for the 

Arts, 5 Beekman Street, 

Suite 600, New York, NY 

10038 



New York Foundation for 
the Arts, Inc. 
FY 1987 
$30,000 
87-4251-0083 
Contact: Director, New 
York Foundation for the 
Arts, Inc., 5 Beekman 
Street, Suite 600, New 
York, NY 10038 



To support collaborative planning among 
architect Robert Frasca and several vi- 
sual artists for the Oregon Convention 
Center. The aim was to integrate art and 
architecture in the center. (Design Arts/ 
Visual Arts Collaboration.) 



To hold a conference focusing on the 
relationships of sculpture, architecture 
and urban design. Two reports on the 
conference were produced. 



To produce a prototypical exhibit of in- 
formation about cultural activities and 
events within walking distance of the 
Fifth Avenue and 53rd Street subway 
station in New York City. 



To conduct design work and research 
necessary to incorporate works of art into 
public spaces in a planned, subsidized 
housing development on the Lower East 
Side. 



To produce a film on a recent work, The 
Pont Neuf Wrapped, by environmental 
artist Christo. The work consisted of the 
temporary wrapping of a bridge, Pont 
Neuf, in Paris, France. 



To complete a film examining the 
trompe I'oeil mural painting of artist 
Richard Haas. The aims were to raise is- 
sues about the role of art in urban plan- 
ning and present Haas's approach to 
dealing with urban blight. 



New York Foundation for 

the Arts, Inc. 

FY 1987 

$40,000 

87-4251-0006 

Contact: Director, Artists' 

Sponsorship Program, New 

York Foundation for the 

Arts, Inc., 5 Beekman 

Street, Suite 600, New 

York, NY 10038 



New York Landmarks 

Preservation Foundation 

FY 1982 

$20,000 

22-4230-244 

Contact: Chairman, New 

York Landmarks 

Preservation Foundation, 20 

Vessey Street, New York, 

NY 10007 



North Carolina Museum of 

Art Foundation 

FY 1987 

$56,900 

87-4170-0461 

Contact: President, North 

Carolina Museum of Art 

Foundation, 2110 Blue 

Ridge Boulevard, Raleigh, 

NC 27607 



Pevnick, Stephen H. 
FY 1980 
$10,000 
01-4213-176 
Conwc/.- 2314 East 
Wyoming Place, 
Milwaukee, WI 53202 



Pevnick, Stephen 

FY 1984 

$10,000 

41-4213-0144 

Contact: 3326 North 

Downer, Milwaukee, Wl 

53211 



Richmond Foundation for 

the Arts 

FY 1983 

$30,000 

32-4230-00089 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Richmond Foundation for 

the Arts, 1001 East Clay 

Street, Richmond, VA 

23219 



To produce a film that explores ambi- 
tious joint efforts by visual artists and ar- 
chitects, including the Weisner buildings 
and grounds at M.I.T, Park de la 
Villette in Paris and Battery Park City in 
New York. 



To evaluate Crissy Field, a large former 
army base east of the Golden Gate 
Bridge, as a possible location for site-spe- 
cific sculpture. Two workshops involving 
a group of architects and artists were 
held. 



For a collaboration among a visual artist 
and a landscape architect, working with 
museum professionals and 
horticulturalists, to develop a master 
plan for the North Carolina Museum's 
grounds. (Design Arts/Visual Arts 
Collaboration.) 



To design a programmable light sculp- 
ture that utilizes water droplets, strobe 
lighting, a matrix of values and industrial 
design principles. The project was 
documented in an audiovisual program 
entitled "Rainfall-Light Sculpture." 



To continue development and testing of a 
computer-run fountain. The fountain is a 
programmable light sculpture which uses 
strobe lighting to form free-floating 
graphic images. 



To host a public art and design compe- 
tition to animate fifteen sites in the Rich- 
mond arts district. The project was part 
of the Arts and Amenities Program of 
the Richmond Foundation for the Arts. 



DESIGN FOR THE ARTS 129 



San Fernando Valley Arts 

Council 

FY 1977 

$20,000 

R70^2-106 

Contact: President, San 

Fernando Valley Arts 

Council, 9055 Reseda 

Boulevard, Northridge, CA 

91328 



San Francisco Art Institute 

FY 1982 

$5,000 

22-4230-224 

Contact: President, San 

Francisco Art Institute, 800 

Chestnut Street, San 

Francisco, CA 941 33 



Sculpture in the 

Environment 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R70-42-I73 

Contact: Project Manager, 

Sculpture in the 

Environment, 60 Greene 

Street, New York, NY 

10012 



Seattle Arts Commission 

FY 1987 

$80,000 

87-4170^001 

Contact: Seattle Arts 

Commission, 305 Harrison 

Street, Seattle, WA 98109 



To plan and design the arts facilities for 
a proposed Arts Park on an eighty-acre 
site in the San Fernando Valley. Slides 
and a fact sheet documented the project. 



Silvetti, Jorge 
FY 1984 
$10,000 
41-4213-0147 
Contact: Harvard 
University, Department of 
Architecture, Graduate 
School of Design, 
Cambridge, MA 02138 



Slovic, David/Webb, 

Michael 

FY 1982 

$7,000 

21-4213-186 

Contact: D. Slovic, Friday 

Architects Planners, 26 S. 

20th Street, Philadelphia, 

PA; Michael Webb, Asst. 

Professor, Drexel 

University, 125 Union, Bala 

Cynwyd, PA 



For a two-day workshop to develop a 
master plan for the use of Crissy Field as 
a location for site-specific sculpture. A 
thirty-page report on the proceedings was 
issued. 



For a volume focusing on environmental 
arts and architecture. The aim was to 
document projects that fall somewhere 
between the conventional definitions of 
art and architecture and that deal with 
such issues as fragmentation, invisibility 
and theatrical event. 



To host an invitational competition of 
teams of artists and designers to develop 
a schematic proposal for the design of a 
new civic center complex for the city of 
Seattle. The civic center was envisioned 
as the governmental hub of the city, 
bringing together city employees scat- 
tered in eighteen separate locations. (De- 
sign Arts/Visual Arts Collaboration.) 



To explore the current relationship of ar- 
chitecture and the design arts and visual 
arts. In recent years an overlapping of 
disciplines has resulted in new hybrid 
types — earthworks and interior architec- 
ture — that have created confusion in the- 
ory and criticism. 



To design a public plaza on the Temple 
University campus through the collabora- 
tion of an architect and a painter, and to 
involve the campus community in the de- 
sign process. The aims were to create a 
model of for collaborative efforts and to 
develop means of defining special areas 
and reinforcing public activities in them. 
Slides of the project were made. 



Spanish Institute. Inc. 

FY 1987 

$12,400 

87^251-0102 

Contact: Director, Spanish 

Institute, Inc., 684 Park 

Avenue, New York, NY 

10021 



Sun Foundation for 

Advancement in the 

Environmental Arts and 

Sciences 

FY 1978 

$3,000 

R80-42-8I 

Contact: Project Director, 

Sun Foundation for 

Advancement in the 

Environmental Arts and 

Sciences, R.R. 2, PO. Box 

156E, Washburn, IL 61570 



Trustees of the University of 

Pennsylvania 

FY 1980 

$15,000 

02-4250-136 

Contact: Assistant Director, 

University of Pennsylvania, 

Research Administration, 

34th and Walnut Streets, 

Philadelphia, PA 19104 



To produce an exhibition at the Spanish 
Institute in New York documenting pub- 
lic art projects in Barcelona, Spain, and 
to hold a symposium applying the Barce- 
lona experience to similar undertakings 
in the United States. 



To carry out the design planning phase 
for an environmental arts center in cen- 
tral Illinois. 



For the catalogue to the exhibition Ur- 
ban Encounters. The catalogue docu- 
ments fifteen sites in the United States 
that have been marked by a painter or 
sculptor. The projects relate significantly 
to their settings and are well-used by 
their audiences. Urban Encounters: Art, 
Architecture, Audience, was published in 
1980 by the Institute of Contemporary 
Art. 




Maryland Art Place, an artists' organization, sponsored the 
collaboration between an artist and landscape architect that re- 
sulted in this streetscape design of the loft area in Baltimore. 



130 CHAPTER THREE 



United States Capitol 

Historical Society 

FY 1985 

$37,200 

52-4231-0051 

Contact: President, United 

States Capitol Historical 

Society, 200 Maryland 

Avenue, N.W., Washington, 

DC 20002 



University of 

Massachusetts, Amherst 

FY 1987 

$6,000 

87-4251-0070 

Contact: Director, Grants 

and Contracts, University of 

Massachusetts, Amherst 

Campus, Amherst, MA 

01003 



University of Pennsylvania 

for Morris Arboretum 

FY 1985 

$25,000 

52-4231-0159 

Contact: Office of Research 

Administration, University 

of Pennsylvania, 405 

Franklin, Building 16, 3451 

Walnut Street, Philadelphia, 

PA 19104 



Visiting Artists, Inc. 

FY 1985 

$5,000 

52-4231-0098 

Contact: President, Visiting 

Artists, Inc., 2717 Nichols 

Lane, Davenport, lA 52803 



Visual Artists, Inc. 

FY 1986 

$15,000 

86-4231-0014 

Contact: Associate Director, 

Visual Artists, Inc., 146 

Sullivan Street, New York, 

NY 10012 



Visual Artists, Inc. 

FY 1987 

$15,000 

87^251-0065 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Visual Artists, Inc., 51 

Eldorado Place, 

Weehawken, NJ 07087 



To host a competition to select an artist 
to create a bust of Dr. Martin Luther 
King, Jr., for placement in the United 
States Capitol. 



To support the design portion of a collab- 
orative public art project between sculp- 
tor Nancy Holt and the Walker Kluesing 
Design Group, a Boston-based landscape 
architecture firm. 



To develop a plan integrating contempo- 
rary sculpture into the Morris Arbo- 
retum through a collaboration of land- 
scape architects, garden designers, 
sculptors and others, and to produce 
broadly applicable guidelines for land- 
scape gardens. 



To develop a plan for a plaza on the Mis- 
sissippi River in downtown Davenport, 
Iowa, through an artist-architect collabo- 
rative effort. The plan covered pedestrian 
and vehicular requirements as well as so- 
cial and commercial needs. The project 
was documented in slides. 



To develop Urban Transformation, a 
site-specific, environmental public work 
for a traffic island and the surrounding 
four-block area in New York City. An in- 
terdisciplinary team blending art, ar- 
chitecture and landscape design collabo- 
rated on the project, which was 
documented in photographs. 



To develop a plan for a new use of the 
Weehawken water tower through an art- 
ist-architect collaboration. The tower is a 
national landmark that has been unused 
for more than sixty years. 



Walker Art Center 

FY 1981 

$5,000 

12-4221-241 

Contact: Graphic Designer, 

Walker Art Center, 

Vineland Place, 

Minneapolis, MN 55403 



Walker Art Center 
FY 1986 
$55,000 
86-4141-0204 
Contact: Assistant 
Controller, Walker Art 
Center, Vineland Place, 
Minneapolis, MN 55403 



Washington State Arts 

Commission 

FY 1987 

$75,000 

87-41700462 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Washington State Arts 

Commission, Mail Stop CH- 

1 1, Ninth and Columbia 

Building, Olympia, WA 

98504 



Wellesley College 

FY 1987 

$15,000 

87-4170-0002 

Contact: Wellesley College, 

Wellesley, MA 02181 



William James Association 

FY 1979 

$3,450 

92-4233-188 

Contact: Project Director, 

William James Association, 

235 Pine Flat Road, Santa 

Cruz, CA 95060 



To produce a special issue of Design 
Quarterly magazine that addresses 
collaborations between artists and archi- 
tects and ways in which large-scale inter- 
disciplinary projects can bring the visual 
arts into harmony with the design arts. 



To commission designs for a pedestrian 
bridge by Siah Armajani as part of a 
partnership of the Walker Art Center 
and the Minneapolis Park Board to de- 
velop seven acres of city-owned land as a 
sculpture garden. The bridge spans a 
highway and forms the final link in a 
greenway system connecting the Missis- 
sippi River, the city and the chain of 
lakes stretching beyond. 



To support a national design competition 
for a series of public spaces on the cam- 
pus of Washington State University in 
Pullman. The site of the competition is 
the Glenn Terrell Friendship Mall, a six- 
block area on campus consisting of pe- 
destrian ways, plazas and streets. (Design 
Arts/Visual Arts Collaboration.) 



For a collaboration between sculptor Mi- 
chael Singer and architect Michael 
McKinnell on a new work in a public, 
wooded pathway through the Wellesley 
College campus. One aim was to foster 
an exchange of concerns between visual 
art and landscape architecture. (Design 
Arts/Visual Arts Collaboration.) 



To support planning for outdoor sculp- 
ture and fountains for the Museum 
Without Walls. 



DESIGN FOR THE ARTS 131 



Wines, James N. 

FY 1980 

$4,000 

01-4214-029 

Contact: Partner, Sculpture 

in the Environment (SITE), 

60 Greene Street, New 

York, NY 10012 



To write a comprehensive summary of 
the theories and ideas of Sculpture in the 
Environment (SITE), a firm whose work 
is a fusion of art and architecture. SITE 
is based on the beUef that it is important 
for buildings to include social and psy- 
chological references as a means of 
heightened communication. 



Educational Facilities and Programs 

Adaptive reuse and design planning projects serving com- 
munity arts education programs. 



Akron Art Institute 

FY 1978 

$12,500 

R80-42-64 

Contact: Director, Akron 

Art Institute, 69 East 

Market Street, Akron, OH 

44308 



Alabama School of Fine 

Arts Foundation 

FY 1985 

$60,300 

52-4257-0127 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Alabama School of Fine 

Arts Foundation, 1 1 75 Bank 

for Savings Building, 1919 

Morris Avenue, 

Birmingham, AL 35203 



Alfred University 

FY 1982 

$30,000 

22-4230-010 

Contact: Provost, Alfred 

University, Alfred, NY 

14802 



American Film Institute 

FY 1981 

$10,000 

12-4230-185 

Contact: Associate Director, 

American Film Institute, 

John F Kennedy Center for 

the Performing Arts, 

Washington, DC 20566 



To evaluate potential sites and to develop 
a building program as part of initial 
architectural studies for the relocation of 
the Akron Art Institute to the downtown 
area. Two reports on the project were is- 
sued. 



To conduct a national design competition 
for a new facility for the Alabama 
School for Fine Arts, a state-supported 
fine arts career school exclusively for stu- 
dents in grades seven to twelve. 



To produce schematic designs and stud- 
ies for the conversion of the historic 
Alumni Hall into a flexible performance 
space adaptable for diverse uses: classic 
and contemporary drama, dance, music, 
lectures and workshops. 



To develop an implementation strategy 
for a new and creative financing struc- 
ture for the purchase of American Film 
Institute's new campus in Los Angeles, 
the Immaculate Heart College. A pre- 
liminary feasibility report was issued. 



American Institute of 

Musical Studies 

FY 1977 

$16,000 

R70^2-66 

Contact: Restoration 

Coordinator, American 

Institute of Musical Studies, 

2120 McKinney Avenue, 

Dallas, TX 75201 



Baltimore Theater Project 

FY 1979 

$15,000 

92-4211-001 

Contact: Director, Baltimore 

Theater Project, 34 West 

Preston Street, Baltimore, 

MD 21201 



Boston Architectural Center 

FY 1981 

$30,000 

12-4221-234 

Contact: President, Boston 

Architectural Center, 320 

Newbury Street, Boston, 

MA 021 15 



Brooklyn Academy of 

Music 

FY 1978 

$12,500 

R80-42-66 

Contact: Brooklyn Academy 

of Music, 30 Lafayette 

Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 

11217 



To prepare designs for the conversion of 
a historic church to a performing arts 
center and music school and to complete 
architectural plans for restoration of the 
prairie-style Trinity Methodist Church 
building. 



To plan and design the renovation of an 
eighty-year-old building and four adja- 
cent townhouses as a center for the Balti- 
more Theater Project, a national model 
for training economically disadvantaged 
high school students in the arts. A 
ninety-five-page report was issued. 



To develop an independent secondary 
school specializing in the fine arts that 
ofi"ers a broad and intelligent set of ex- 
periences to college-bound students. 



To produce a master plan and to frame 
recommendations for improvements to 
the Brooklyn Academy of Music build- 
ing. 




A hands-on exhibit called Works on Paper involves children at 
the Boston Children's Museum in making decisions about graphic 
design. The children are encouraged to experiment. 



132 CHAPTER THREE 



Brooklyn Institute of Arts 
and Sciences 
FY 1983 
$25,000 
32-4230-00076 
Contact: Director, The 
Brooklyn Museum, Eastern 
Parkway, New York, NY 
11238 



Center for Creative Studies 

FY 1982 

$5,000 

22-4230002 

Contact: Vice-President, 

Institutional Advancement, 

College of Arts and Design, 

Center for Creative Studies, 

245 East Kirby, Detroit, Ml 

48202 



Central Wyoming 

Community College 

Foundation 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

92-4211-017 

Contact: President, Central 

Wyoming Community 

College Foundation, Box 

1520, Riverton,WY 82501 



Cornish School of Allied 

Arts 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R80-42-5 

Contact: Cornish School of 

Allied Arts, 710 East Roy, 

Seattle, WA 98102 



David Hochstein Memorial 

Music School 

FY 1979 

$20000 

92-4211-015 

Contact: President, David 

Hochstein Memorial Music 

School, 50 North Plymouth 

Avenue, Rochester, NY 

I46I4 



GAME, Inc. 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

92-4211-018 

Contact: Director, Growth 

Through Art and Museum 

Experience (GAME, Inc.) 

314 West 54th Street, New 

York, NY 10019 



For architectural designs to convert the 
Brooklyn Museum's boiler plant, de- 
signed by McKim, Mead & White in 
1907, into a home for the Brooklyn Insti- 
tute of Art and Sciences. Preliminary 
studies indicate that the building's loca- 
tion, generous space and ample natural 
light combine to make it an ideal modern 
studio facility. A videotape on the 
project was created. 



To renovate two buildings in the East 
Perry Avenue historic district for class- 
rooms, faculty offices and a student cen- 
ter for the Center for Creative Studies of 
the College of Arts and Design in De- 
troit. The buildings are listed on the Na- 
tional Register of Historic Places. 



To design a facility for the arts that 
serves the needs of the Central Wyoming 
Community College and of the surround- 
ing area. 



For a study of the Cornish School of Al- 
lied Arts to explore the problems, poten- 
tials and alternative plans for the school's 
physical growth and development. 



To design and plan the adaptive use of a 
large church (built in 1858) as a perma- 
nent home for the Hochstein Music 
School and other arts activities: dance in- 
struction by a local, well-known dance 
company and rehearsal space for the 
Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra. 



To plan and design new and expanded 
facilities required by the growth of 
game's programming. GAME serves 
some 8,500 children and adults through 
arts-integrated curriculum enrichment 
programs, teacher and museum staff 
training, an adult learning center and 
special programs. 



Haystack Mountain School 

of Crafts 

FY 1979 

$5,000 

92^211-019 

Contact: Director, Haystack 

Mountain School of Crafts, 

Deer Isle, ME 04627 



Manna House Workshops, 

Inc. 

FY 1979 

$20,000 

92-4211-223 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Manna House Workshops, 

Inc., 338 East 106th Street, 

New York, NY 10029 



Martha Graham School of 

Contemporary Dance 

FY 1978 

$12,000 

R8O42-140 

Contact: General Manager, 

Martha Graham School of 

Contemporary Dance, 316 

East 63rd Street, New 

York, NY 10021 



Mary Baldwin College 

FY 1978 

$17,500 

R80-42-127C 

Contact: Vice-President for 

Development, Mary 

Baldwin College, New and 

Frederick Streets, Staunton, 

VA 24401 



New Orleans Jazz and 

Heritage Foundation 

FY 1987 

$25,000 

87-4251-0094 

Contact: Executive Director, 

New Orleans Jazz and 

Heritage Foundation, 1205 

North Rampart Street, New 

Orleans, LA 701 16 



Renfro, Nancy W. 

FY 1978 

$5,000 

R81-42-17N 

Contact: 434 Round 

Mountain Drive, Austin, TX 

78734 



To design a climate-controlled multiuse 
meeting space for enrichment programs. 
The aim was to remedy deficiencies in 
the Haystack Mountain School's current 
facilities. 



To redesign the Manna House Work- 
shops, a community cultural education 
center serving East Harlem and New 
York City. The center offers professional 
music instruction privately and in small 
group classes to some 1 50 students. A 
brief report was prepared. 



To study the space needs of the Martha 
Graham Company and School of Dance. 
The firm Hardy Holzman Pfeiffer inves- 
tigated how to maximize use of the exist- 
ing facilities shared by the company and 
school as well as opportunities for new 
construction on the site. 



To conduct a feasibility study investigat- 
ing the reuse of the historic Staunton 
Military Academy as a performing arts 
center for Mary Baldwin College and the 
community of Staunton, Virginia. A 
sixty-page reuse plan was produced. 



To develop plans to rehabilitate a his- 
toric 1850s structure to house the School 
of New Orleans Music, providing concert 
and rehearsal space, offices and a record- 
ing studio. 



To develop an art curriculum incorporat- 
ing architecture and environmental de- 
sign for primary and secondary school 
students. The project included lectures 
and workshops and was documented in 
slides. 



DESIGN FOR THE ARTS 1 33 



Research Foundation of the 

City University of New 

York 

FY 1984 

$20,000 

42-4231-0031 

Contact: Director, Research 

Foundation of the City 

University of New York, 

1515 Broadway, New York, 

NY 10036 



Roosevelt University 
FY 1977 
$19,655 
R7a42-151 
Contact: Dean of 
Administration, Roosevelt 
University, 430 South 
Michigan Avenue, Chicago, 
IL 60605 



Settlement Music School of 

Philadelphia 

FY 1978 

$20,000 

R8042-12 

Contact: Settlement Music 

School of Philadelphia, 416 

Queen Street, Philadelphia, 

PA 19147 



Sharon Arts Center 

FY 1979 

$2,000 

92-4211-030 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Sharon Arts Center, R.F.D. 

No. 2, Box 361, Sharon, 

NH 03458 



Skowhegan School of 

Painting and Sculpture 

FY 1982 

$25,000 

22-4230034 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Skowhegan School of 

Painting and Sculpture, 

Skowhegan, ME 04976 



St. Louis Conservatory and 

Schools for the Arts 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R80-42-145 

Contact: St. Louis 

Conservatory and Schools 

for the Arts, 560 Trinity, St. 

Louis, MO 63130 



To redesign the ground floor of 
LaGuardia Hall at Brooklyn College to 
house the Museum of the Borough of 
Brooklyn. The design of the exhibit space 
incorporated a system of floating walls 
and an easily replicated display system. 
A brief report was prepared. 



To prepare a master plan for Roosevelt 
University's historic auditorium building, 
designed by Dankmar Adler and Louis 
Sullivan. The aim was to restore and re- 
habilitate it as a cultural center and uni- 
versity building. Two reports were pro- 
duced. 



For initial design work and a feasibility 
study for the rehabilitation and expan- 
sion of the Settlement Music School. 
Special focus went to providing handi- 
capped accessibility. A technical-needs 
report for the school, housed in a con- 
verted nineteenth-century mansion, was 
prepared. 



To formulate a master plan for the 
Sharon Arts Center's thirty-one-year-old 
facility. The center offers residents of 
thirty communities instruction in the arts 
and crafts, a modern gallery for the exhi- 
bition of participants' work and a crafts 
shop for the sale of work by New Hamp- 
shire artists and craftsmen. 



To host a five-day on-site charette and 
design competition to select an architect 
for the design of a new building. The 
Skowhegan School is governed by 
twenty-five artists and is dedicated to 
helping young artists make the transition 
from students to self-motivated profes- 
sionals. A $5,000 amendment was made 
in the same year. 



To complete architectural plans for ren- 
ovation of the Shaare Emeth Temple as 
an arts facility for the St. Louis Conser- 
vatory and Schools for the Arts. 



Trustees of the University of 

Pennsylvania 

FY 1986 

$20,000 

86-4231-0006 

Contact: Assistant Director, 

Trustees of the University of 

Pennsylvania, 409 Franklin, 

Building 16,3451 Walnut 

Street, Philadelphia, PA 

19104 



University of Missouri 

FY 1978 

$7,500 

R80-42-14 

Contact: Assistant Provost, 

University of Missouri, 5100 

Rockhill Road, Kansas City, 

MO 641 10 



Virginia Opera Association 

FY 1982 

$20,000 

22-4230-224 

Contact: President, Virginia 

Opera Association, 261 

West Bute Street, Norfolk, 

VA 23510 



Wayne State University 

FY 1987 

$20,000 

87-4251-0166 

Contact: Director, Research 

and Sponsored Programs, 

Wayne State University, 

5050 Cass Avenue, Room 

1064, Detroit, MI 40202 



For a preservation plan for the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania's Fine Arts Library, 
a registered national landmark and a ma- 
jor work of Frank Furness, a nineteenth- 
century architect. The aim was to main- 
tain the library's integrity while 
upgrading its internal systems and facili- 
ties. The master plan was documented in 
a three-volume report. 



To develop plans for a new facility to 
house the Missouri Repertory Theater 
and its academic programs. A brief feasi- 
bility report was prepared. 



To develop a schematic design for the 
renovation of Norfolk Center Theater, a 
site selected by the city of Norfolk for 
the state's regional magnet school. 



To study the feasibility of redesigning 
the interior of Old Main, the original 
building at Wayne State University, as a 
campus and community center for the 
fine and performing arts. Old Main, built 
in 1896, is a registered Michigan Histori- 
cal Site. 



Artists' Housing and Studio Space 

Creation of artists' working and living facilities through 
conversion of unused and underused structures and con- 
struction of new buildings. 



Abel, Cora Beth 

FY 1981 

$9,000 

11-4213-220 

Contact: 1 2 Lee Street, 

Cambridge, MA 02139 



For a photographic report documenting 
the process of salvaging a historic temple 
for use as artists' live/work space. This 
project, the Artspace Condominium, be- 
came the city's first legally zoned artist- 
owned building. Thirteen variances were 
obtained to permit artists to live, work, 
sell, teach and exhibit in their studios. 



134 CHAPTER THREE 



Allied Arts Foundation 

FY 1979 

$7,705 

92^211-210 

Contacl: Architect, Allied 

Arts Foundation, 107 South 

Main Street, Seattle, WA 

98104 



Anderson Ranch Arts 

Center 

FY 1980 

$10,000 

02-4230-084 

Contact: Director, Anderson 

Ranch Arts Center, RO. 

Box 2406, Aspen, CO 

81611 



Artists' Equity Institute 
FY 1981 
$20,000 
12-4230-061 
Contact: Secretary, 
Goodman Building 
Development Corporation, 
1117 Geary Boulevard, San 
Francisco, C A 94109 



Artists for Environment 

Foundation 

FY 1977 

$20,000 

R70-42-68 

Contacl: President, Artists 

for Environment 

Foundation, Columbia, NJ 

07832 



Artists' Foundation, Inc. 
FY 1980 
$15,000 
02-4250-109 
Contact: The Artists' 
Foundation, Inc., 100 
Boylston Street, Boston, 
MA 021 16 



Artspace Reuse Project, 

Inc. 

FY 1980 

$15,000 

02-4254-046 

Contacl: Executive Director, 

Artspace Reuse Project, 

Inc., 400 First Avenue 

North, Room 203, 

Minneapolis, MN 55401 



To explore viable alternatives for devel- 
opment of artists' housing and studio 
space in the Seattle, Washington, area. 



To plan and design the renovation of the 
Anderson Ranch Arts Center's complex 
of vintage log buildings. The goals of 
renovation were to improve the 
workspaces of the center's printmakers, 
photographers, potters and wood and fi- 
ber artists, and to strengthen and winter- 
ize the individual structures. 



To design alternative energy systems for 
the Goodman Building in San Francisco. 
The building is a National Register prop- 
erty that contains live/work spaces for 
artists and storefront spaces providing 
exhibition, performance and workshop 
spaces for the community. 



To conduct a feasibility study for the 
conversion of the historic village of 
Walpack to an art town — with year- 
round residences, educational facilities 
and an environmental campus for artists 
and students. A sixty-five-page report 
was issued. 



For a development plan to convert the 
Bowditch and Valentine schools into art- 
ists' living and working spaces. Reports, 
surveys and proposals documented the 
effort. The Artists' Foundation also es- 
tablished an Artists' Housing Revolving 
Development Loan Fund. 



To plan and develop studio and living 
space for low- to moderate-income artists 
in three converted buildings in the Twin 
Cities. A proposal for the conversion and 
for the Lowertown Arts District was pro- 
duced. 



Bee, Carmi M. 

FY 1980 

$10,000 

01-4213-161 

Contacl: 168 St. John's 

Place, Brooklyn, NY 11217 



Boulder County Women's 

Resource Center, Inc. 

FY 1977 

$5,000 

R70-42-71 

Contact: Director, Boulder 

Center for the Visual Arts, 

1750 13th Street, Boulder, 

CO 80302 



Citiart 

FY 1981 

$6,975 

1 2-4230-050 

Contacl: Architect, Citiart, 

Box 2578, Providence, RI 

02906 



City of Gardner 

FY 1980 

$20,000 

02-4254-050 

Contact: Mayor, City of 

Gardner, City Hall, 95 

Pleasant Street, Gardner, 

MA 01440 



City of Paterson 

FY 1981 

$15,000 

12-4230-188 

Contact: Deputy Director, 

Economic Development, 

City of Paterson, 100 

Hamilton Plaza, Paterson, 

NJ 07505 



Fine Arts Work Center in 

Provincetown 

FY 1979 

$20,245 

92-4211-217 

Contacl: Director, Fine Arts 

Work Center in 

Provincetown, Box 565, 

Provincetown, MA 02657 



To survey residential artist developments 
in various communities in the United 
States. The findings are compiled in a re- 
port that identifies and describes existing 
artists' housing in selected towns and cit- 
ies and includes commentary on their 
value for the surrounding social, cultural, 
physical and economic fabrics. 



For architectural planning for the expan- 
sion of the Boulder Arts Center — a 
downtown work center providing artists' 
studios, musicians' practice space and 
writers' carrels. A grant from the city of 
Boulder permitted construction and capi- 
tal improvements on the facility, and 
work was completed in November 1979. 



To create plans and designs for the incor- 
poration of working and living spaces for 
artists in Providence's downtown urban 
revitalization project known as Davol 
Square. 



To develop a design and plan for the ren- 
ovation of two historic structures as liv- 
ing, learning and working space for re- 
tired craftspersons (who will teach their 
skills to young residents). 



To restore and adapt the Franklin Mill 
into work and display spaces for artists in 
the Great Falls historic district of Pater- 
son, New Jersey. 



To host a design competition for the ren- 
ovation of the Fine Arts Work Center's 
housing facilities. The center occupies 
the historic Day's lumberyard complex. 



DESIGN FOR THE ARTS 135 



Fine Arts Work Center in 

Provincetown 

FY 1981 

$2,930 

12-4250-027 

Contact: Director, Fine Arts 

Work Center in 

Provincetown, Box 565, 

Provincetown, MA 02657 



Fort Point Arts Community 

FY 1982 

$27,000 

22-4230-024 

Contact: Board of Directors, 

Fort Point Arts Community, 

327 A Street, Boston, MA 

02210 



Fort Point Arts Community 

FY 1985 

$9,114 

52-4256-0108 

Contact: President, Fort 

Point Arts Community, 249 

A Street, Boston, MA 

02210 



Friends of the Cleveland 

Landmarks Commission 

FY 1982 

$20,000 

22-4230-025 

Contact: Secretary, Friends 

of the Cleveland Landmarks 

Commission, 601 Lakeside, 

Room 208, Cleveland, OH 

44114 



Kenkeleba House, Inc. 

FY 1985 

$25,000 

52-4231-0023 

Contact: Administrative 

Director, Kenkeleba House, 

Inc., 214 East Second 

Street, New York, NY 

10009 



Lowertown Redevelopment 

Corporation 

FY 1979 

$17,500 

92-4233-259 

Contact: Executive Director. 

Lowertown Redevelopment 

Corporation, Park Square 

Court, 400 Sibley Street, St. 

Paul, MN 55101 



To produce a handbook documenting 
and describing the design competition for 
the renovation of the historic Day's lum- 
beryard complex. A softbound report was 
published. 



To frame design plans designating appro- 
priate spaces and strategies to maintain 
the extensive arts facilities of the com- 
munity of artists, designers, photogra- 
phers and performers in Fort Point. A 
building plan was produced. 



To sponsor a series of six workshops and 
produce a handbook. Artists in Space, on 
the adaptive reuse of buildings as cooper- 
atively owned artists' studio space. The 
aims were to encourage groups of artists 
to organize and develop permanent live/ 
work space and to promote public aware- 
ness of the needs of artists. 



For a study to determine the market de- 
mand for artists' housing in the historic 
warehouse district as part of the district's 
overall redevelopment plan. Two reports 
evaluated demand, needs and charac- 
teristics of live/work space in order to es- 
timate the number of units, their sizes 
and costs and the appropriate service and 
amenity packages. 



To renovate three unused five-story 
buildings on Manhattan's Lower East 
Side as artists' studios and as commu- 
nity-access space. 



To prepare an overall design framework 
for an urban village in downtown St. 
Paul, Minnesota, to consist of galleries 
and theaters and with special attention to 
the provision of living and working 
spaces for artists. A report, Partnership 
in Lowertown, was produced. 



Massachusetts Arts and 

Humanities Foundation 

FY 1977 

$16,315 

R70-42-182 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Massachusetts Arts and 

Humanities Foundation, 14 

Beacon Street, Boston, MA 

02108 



Mayer, Richard A. 

FY 1980 

$10,000 

01-4213-174 

Contact: 27 Fifth Avenue, 

San Francisco, CA 941 18 



Natural Heritage Trust/ 

Art park 

FY 1977 

$2,685 

R70-42-99 

Contact: Visual Arts 

Coordinator, Natural 

Heritage Trust/Artpark, 

Box 371, Lewiston, NY 

14092 



Newark Housing 
Development and 
Rehabilitation Corporation 
FY 1981 
$16,000 
12-4230-164 

Contact: Vice-President, 
Neighborhood Inspection 
Programs, Newark Housing 
Development and 
Rehabilitation, 1 1 1 Hill 
Street, Newark, N J 07102 



North Carolina School of 
the Arts Foundation 
FY 1980 
$17,000 
02-4254-052 
Contact: Assistant 
Secretary, North Carolina 
School of Arts Foundation, 
PO. Box 12189, Winston- 
Salem, NC 27107 



Prete, Barbara J. 

FY 1982 

$10,000 

21-4213-104 

Co/iWf/. Journalist, 155 

Bank Street, New York, 

NY 10014 



To convert vacant and/or underutilized 
buildings to artists' living and working 
space in metropolitan areas of Massachu- 
setts. Research, planning and develop- 
ment of policy recommendations were 
carried out. A 120-page report was is- 
sued. 



For an analysis of the market factors, 
policy, planning and design issues related 
to artists' housing. The project led to a 
statewide conference on artist housing in 
California. A report entitled Live/Work 
Space: Changing Public Policy was pro- 
duced. 



To conduct a workshop exploring the fea- 
sibility of building housing for artists in 
Artpark — a 200-acre cultural facility and 
park overlooking the Niagara River. Two 
reports were produced. 



For a feasibility and conceptual analysis 
of Broad Street in Newark. The project 
included designs for facade remodeling, 
structural renovation and the provision of 
artists' space. The aim was to facilitate 
the establishment of a permanent artists' 
community during the process of down- 
town development. 



To continue the recycling of vacant 
buildings in center city as housing for 
artists through architectural studies and 
schematic designs. Four reports were 
produced. 



To complete the final draft of a book on 
the successes and problems of Westbeth, 
an artists' live/work space in New York. 
The aim was to identify Westbeth's en- 
during positive qualities. 



136 CHAPTER THREE 



Project Artaud 

FY 1982 

$30,000 

22-4230-221 

Contact: Project 

Coordinator, Project 

Artaud, 499 Alabama 

Street, San Francisco, CA 

94110 



Publishing Center for 

Cultural Resources 

FY 1987 

$43,278 

NEA DCA 87-25 

Contact: President, 

Publishing Center for 

Cultural Resources, 625 

Broadway, New York, NY 

10012 



Sculpture and Arts 

Research, Inc. 

FY 1985 

$26,900 

52^231-0005 

Contact: Director, Sculpture 

and Arts Research, Inc., 

193 Tenth Avenue, New 

York, NY 10011 



Shenanarts 

FY 1984 

$17,500 

42^231-0074 

Contact: Director, 

Shenanarts, Pennyroyal 

Farm, Box 167-F, Route 5, 

Staunton, VA 24401 



Urban Homesteading 

Assistance 

FY 1982 

$30,000 

22-4230-216 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Urban Homesteading 

Assistance, Cathedral 

House, 1047 Amsterdam 

Avenue, New York, NY 

10025 



Urban Homesteading 

Assistance 

FY 1984 

$7,000 

42^256-0088 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Urban Homesteading 

Assistance, 1047 

Amsterdam Avenue, New 

York, NY 10025 



To create architectural plans and designs 
for the Project Artaud Theater, including 
the renovation of eighty live/work units 
and the development and construction of 
public space. 



To publish and promote Artists' Housing 
and From Commas to Cathedrals in con- 
nection with the Design Arts Program. 



To complete an adaptive reuse study for 
the conversion of an early twentieth-cen- 
tury synagogue on Manhattan's Lower 
East Side into a multiuse workshop facil- 
ity for sculpture, graphic arts and pho- 
tography. 



To develop an architectural master plan 
for an artists' working and living environ- 
ment at Pennyroyal, a twenty-one-acre 
farm in the Shenandoah valley. 



To conduct a design feasibility study of 
living and working space needs of artists 
in New York City. Schematic designs 
adapted to specific urban neighborhoods 
were developed in close cooperation with 
the city, civic groups and the artist com- 
munity. 



To publish a booklet containing informa- 
tion about artists' space needs, their 
working preferences and methods, to in- 
crease the supply of affordable space for 
artists. 



Vision and Artists 

Foundation 

FY 1984 

$30,000 

42-4257-0076 

Contact: President, Vision, 

Inc., 219 Concord Avenue, 

Cambridge, MA 02138 



Volunteer Lawyers for the 

Arts 

FY 1982 

$5,000 

22-4250-070 

Contact: Volunteer Lawyers 

for the Arts, 36 West 44th 

Street, New York, NY 

10036 



Whitehurst, Deborah A. 

FY 1980 

$7,500 

01-4210-043 

Contact: 833 North Fifth 

Avenue, Phoenix, AZ 85003 



To conduct a regional design-build archi- 
tectural competition for artists' housing 
and work space in Chelsea, Massachu- 
setts. The aim was to explore design con- 
cepts for artists' live/work space on stan- 
dard 50- by 100-foot urban lots. 



To produce workshops and a book, Spe- 
cial Space: A Guide to Artists' Housing 
and Loft Living. The book, published in 
1981, guides artists and lawyers in the le- 
gal issues involved in artists' housing. 



To plan and design a crafts facility in the 
restored mill buildings of Lowell, Massa- 
chusetts. A brief report was prepared. 



Design Behind the Scenes 

Design projects serving the performing arts: lighting, stage 
and costume design, and projects and studies in museum 
and exhibit design. 



Art Institute of Chicago 

FY 1987 

$19,362 

87^251-0103 

Contact: Vice-President, 

Development and Public 

Relations, Art Institute of 

Chicago, Michigan Avenue 

at Adams Street, Chicago, 

IL 60603 



Atlanta Arts Alliance/High 

Museum of Art 

FY 1983 

$6,908 

32-4230-00081 

Contact: Director, Atlanta 

Arts Alliance/High 

Museum of Art, 1280 

Peachtree Street, N.E., 

Atlanta, GA 30309 



To produce a study comparing the ways 
that American and European museums 
emphasize design in planning their col- 
lections, exhibitions and interpretative 
programs. The study is a preliminary 
project for the Art Institute's future ex- 
pansion. 



To design a multisensory labyrinth to 
complement a participatory exhibition 
about the five senses entitled Sensation. 
The exhibition opened in fall 1983 at the 
High Museum of Art. 



DESIGN FOR THE ARTS 1 37 



Bagle, Elizabeth 

FY 1983 

$9,000 

11-4213-260 

Contact: 1615 Fort 

Washington Avenue, Maple 

Glen, PA 19002 



Berliner, Charles A. 

FY 1981 

$5,000 

11-4213-084 

Contact: 1218 12th Street, 

Apt. 1, Santa Monica, CA 

90401 



Brooklyn Academy of 

Music 

FY 1977 

$7,590 

R7042-72 

Contact: Brooklyn Academy 

of Music, 30 Lafayette 

Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 

11217 



Center for Occupational 

Hazards 

FY 1982 

$9,000 

224230-021 

Contact: President, Center 

for Occupational Hazards, 5 

Beekman Street, New York, 

NY 10038 



Contemporary Art Center 

FY 1981 

$15,000 

12-4250-155 

Contact: Project Director, 

Contemporary Art Center, 

900 Camp Street, New 

Orleans, LA 70130 



Gardner, George E. 

FY 1981 

$5,000 

11-4213-223 

Contact: 230 lllinger Road, 

Ossining, NY 10562 



For a manual of design considerations for 
museum exhibits. The first part covers 
color, light, mass, perception and ambi- 
ence; the second part, artifacts, graphics, 
structures, special techniques, visitors 
and harmony; and the third part, design 
procedure, tools, material and processes. 



For costume design collaborations with 
three choreographers. The costume de- 
sign process for each was initiated at the 
beginning stages of the choreographers' 
creation of their new works. 



To trace all electrical systems in the 
Brooklyn Academy of Music's four the- 
aters and in its supplementary facilities 
and to prepare new electrical diagrams 
for all spaces. 



To design simple, inexpensive prototypi- 
cal ventilation systems for individual art- 
ists, art centers and art schools. The de- 
signs can be incorporated into 
specification sheets for general distribu- 
tion. A book entitled Ventilation: A 
Practical Guide was published in 1984, 
coauthored by Nancy Clark, Thomas 
Cutter and Jean-Ann McGrane. 



To develop a prototype studio design for 
the broadcast facility of the Cultural Ca- 
ble Channel, an arts programming chan- 
nel supported by a coalition of seventy- 
one New Orleans-based art 
organizations. 



To survey leading museums in Switzer- 
land, London and the Netherlands to ex- 
amine the exhibition design process and 
how it works under varying conditions. 
The aim was to create solutions to prob- 
lems in the development of new muse- 
ums and in the refurbishing of older 
ones. 



Hubbell, Kent L. 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R71-42-45N 

Contact: 922 Bruce Street, 

Ann Arbor, MI 48103 



James, Vanessa 

FY 1983 

$10,000 

31-4213-00151 

Contact: 685 West End 

Avenue, Apt. 17A, New 

York, NY 10025 



Johnson, Stephanie and 

Rosenbaum, John 

FY 1982 

$10,000 

21-4213-177 

Contact: Stephanie Johnson, 

2740 Mabel Street, 

Berkeley, CA 94709; John 

Rosenbaum, 1530 Buena 

Avenue, Berkeley, CA 



Los Angeles Museum of 

Modern Art 

FY 1983 

$7,500 

32-4230-00071 

Contact: Deputy Director of 

Programs, Los Angeles 

Museum of Modern Art, 

414 Boyd Street, Los 

Angeles, C A 90013 



Levin, Edward S. 

FY 1983 

$10,000 

31-4213-00154 

Contact: 9941 Young Drive, 

Apt. D, Beverly Hills, CA 

90212 



Maine Maritime Museum 

FY 1980 

$17,500 

02-4250-123 

Contact: Maine Maritime 

Museum, 375 Front Street, 

Bath, ME 04530 



To design an improved enclosure system 
for short-term, outdoor public events and 
to build a prototype of the system for use 
at the Ann Arbor Street Arts Fair. 



To experiment with unusual, imperma- 
nent materials in costume and set design. 
The aim was to demonstrate that inter- 
esting set and costume design can be ef- 
fectively produced from scrap, recycled 
and scavenged materials. 



To explore artificial and natural light as 
an art form — especially as related to 
stage lighting — in a collaboration be- 
tween a designer and physicist. The ideas 
developed were used in a dance choreo- 
graphed by Halifu Osumare. Slides and 
videotapes were produced. 



To support a collaborative design and 
theatrical presentation combining the tal- 
ents of choreographer Lucinda Childs 
and architect Frank Gehry. The collabo- 
ration is part of the museum's interdisci- 
plinary art series. Stages of Performance. 
A video and brief report, Available 
Light, were produced. 



To research a book on temporary archi- 
tectural structures used as backdrops for 
the enhancement of public events and 
celebrations. Such structures invite par- 
ticipation in public events, and they have 
been used, for example, in the Medici 
festivals. World War I homecoming pa- 
rades and the wedding of Prince Charles. 



To compile an archive of perspective 
sketch drawings and detailed technical 
drawings of small sailing craft types and 
seamanship practices of the inshore fish- 
eries of North America. The aim was to 
encourage the appreciation and revival of 
individual design and craftsmanship. A 
videotape was produced. 



138 CHAPTER THREE 



Museum of Comemporarv 

An 

FY 1978 

$4,820 

R8(M2-141 

Contact: Museum of 

Contemporary Art, 237 East 

Ontario Street, Chicago, IL 

60611 



Mtume, Adrienne K. 

FY 1982 

$3,000 

21-4212-085 

Contact: Costume Designer, 

RO. Box 1093, Newark, NJ 

07112 



National Conservation 

Advisory Council 

FY 1981 

$16,625 

12^221-186 

Contact: National 

Conservation Advisory 

Council, The Smithsonian 

Institution, Arts and 

Industries Building. 

Washington, DC 20560 



Northern Illinois University 
FY 1985 
$35,000 
52-4256-0042 
Contact: Controller, 
Northern Illinois University, 
Office of the Controller, 
Division of Business Affairs, 
DeKalb, IL60116 



Opera Company of 

Philadelphia 

FY 1982 

$11,400 

22-4230029 

Contact: Manager, Opera 

Company of Philadelphia, 

1518 Walnut Street, Suite 

310, Philadelphia, PA 

19102 



Playhouse Square 

Foundation 

FY 1982 

$25,000 

22-4230^30 

Contact: Development 

Director, Playhouse Square 

Foundation, Suite 810, 

Keith Building, 1621 Euclid 

Avenue, Cleveland, OH 

44115 



To design an Alternative Space Kit con- 
sisting of flexible, movable components 
for lighting, sound and seating. The aim 
was to create suitable performance 
spaces in temporary locations or perma- 
nent installations. 



To study the synthesis of traditional Ca- 
ribbean costume art forms with contem- 
porary North American costumes for 
stage productions. 



To research and prepare a study to eval- 
uate and quantify national needs for con- 
servation of cultural property in mu- 
seum, libraries, archives, historic 
properties and related collections. The 
Design Arts Program supported the por- 
tion of the study focusing on historic 
properties of buildings and landscapes. 



To prepare an exhibit introducing the art 
of opera stage design to scenic designers, 
scholars, visual artists and the general 
public. The exhibit also illustrated the 
concept of stage design. Slides and a 
summary documented the exhibit. 



To hire a director of design and produc- 
tion for six months to design sets for 
three theatrical productions. One of 
these productions, La Boheme, was 
broadcast on television. 



To conduct a feasibility study directed 
by the designer Gyorgy Kepes that inves- 
tigates the "tower of light" concept and 
the use of light and other kinetic art 
forms as visual symbols to unify the 
Playhouse Square theater district. 



President and Fellows of 

Harvard University 

FY 1977 

$5,000 

R70-42-93 

Contact: Director, Fogg Art 

Museum, 1350 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

Cambridge, MA 02138 



Romero, Cari O. 

FY 1981 

$5,000 

1M213-104 

Contact: 1426 Carroll 

Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 

90026 



Schoener, Allon 

FY 1982 

$10,000 

2M213-185 

Contact: Exhibition 

Designer, Grafton, VT 

05146 



To evaluate recent museum architecture 
in North America and to develop a 
scholarly publication and a permanent 
accessible archive based on the study. 



U.S. Institute for Theater 

Technology. Inc. 

FY 1987 

$8,000 

87-4251-0165 

Contact: President, U.S. 

Institute for Theater 

Technology, Inc., 330 West 

42nd Street, Suite 1702, 

New York, NY 10036 



Virginia Stage Company 
FY 1981 
$15,000 
12-4230-075 
Contact: Producing 
Director, Norfolk Theater 
Center, 108-144 East 
Tazewell Street, Norfolk, 
VA 23510 



Word City: Chicago Print 

Center 

FY 1985 

$4,240 

52-4256-0046 

Contact: President, Word 

City: Chicago Print Center, 

721 South Dearborn, 

Chicago, IL 60605 



To explore the design possibilities of 
hathane form, widening the context of 
costume and set design for small the- 
aters. The project included completion of 
a working stage set and a series of 
masks. 



To prepare a book on international mu- 
seum exhibition design in the twentieth 
century. The growth in the size and 
sophistication of museum audiences has 
led to expectations that any exhibit of 
significant cultural interest be presented 
effectively. A preliminary report was is- 
sued. 



To design and produce a catalogue for 
the 1988 Scenography Exposition, a na- 
tional exhibit of the design and graphics 
work of scenic, costume and lighting de- 
signers. 



I 



To produce a plan for the redistribution 
of nonperformance space and to develop 
a comprehensive scheme for heating and 
air conditioning for the Wells Theater, a 
National Historic Landmark. Architec- 
tural drawings and related documents 
were prepared. 



To produce a series of workshops for repy- 
resentatives of arts-related organizations 
and nonprofit agencies. Four information 
pamphlets were published: "Typography 
Basics I," "Typography Basics II," "Ba- 
sics of Design and Production" and "An 
Introduction to Printing." 



DESIGN FOR THE ARTS 1 39 



Wright, Geoffrey C. 

FY 1981 

$5,000 

1M212-116 

Contact: 1430 East Yandell 

Street, El Paso, TX 79902 



Zgolinski, Albert G. 

FY 1981 

$5,000 

11-4212-117 

Contact: One Dash Place, 

Bronx, NY 10463 



To design a lightweight fabric bandshell 
for the El Paso Amphitheater. The de- 
sign gave careful consideration to acous- 
tics, wind resistance and retractability 
for occasions when the bandshell is not 
appropriate. Architectural drawings were 
produced. 



To plan and write a reference manual of 
case histories focusing on the various cli- 
matic requirements for energy conserva- 
tion. The publication is for use by mu- 
seum operators and professionals 
designing museums. 




u • '^^S*^" 



v^ 



Pi 




'il 



II 



4 



Design for 
Individuals 



Captain Eldridge's House in 
Hyannis, Massachusetts, a 
home for senior citizens, re- 
ceived a Governor's Design 
Award as a structure that rep- 
resents design excellence and 
also benefits its users. 



"Just as voices call for a restoration of humanity's unity with 
the natural environment, there is a growing awareness of the 
need to restore human and aesthetic values to the man-made 
environment and mass communications," says Philip Meggs 
in A History of Graphic Design. Meggs believes that "the 
design arts — architectural, product, fashion, interior and 
graphic design — offer one means for this restoration." 

Restoring human and aesthetic values is a difficult task for 
any profession. It is interesting, though, to examine the 350 
grants in this chapter and measure them against that goal. As 
expected, nearly all the projects have some aesthetic goal; 
what is surprising is that so many projects also have humani- 
tarian purposes. As Bill Lacy, former president of the Cooper 
Union, remarked, "Designers go through life 'seeing' their 
surroundings with critical eyes, always seeking ways to im- 
prove what is unsightly and unworkable. Without intending to 
ennoble them unreasonably, I would say that their mission in 
life is to improve the lot of their fellow man." 

Certainly that is the aim of the majority of the grants in the 
housing category. Some aim to help the homeless and low- 
income people. The Cultural Council Foundation, for exam- 
ple, held a symposium on design solutions, including models 
for temporary shelters, transitional and low-income housing. 
The Coalition for the Homeless provided design services for 
renovating an unused building in Washington, D.C., as a 
shelter. Design Coalition produced a film showing self-help 
home design and building processes, and the New Jersey 
Institute of Technology gathered information on how to trans- 
late low-income design concepts into housing policy. 

Other projects studied alternatives to conventional hous- 
ing — mobile homes, earth-sheltered housing, bioshelters. The 
Minneapolis Society of Fine Arts held a national competition 
to generate ideas for the design of small, affordable, energy- 
efficient housing units. The Ecumenical Association for 
Housing explored the issues involved in shared living 
spaces- — combining owned units with a system of shared 
spaces; and the Pittsburgh Presbytery analyzed how the con- 
cept affected elderly persons. Other grantees, such as the 
University of Southern California, documented the need of 
the elderly for outdoor spaces designed as an integral part of 
their housing. 

Designers in other fields tackled other problems. In graphic 
design, the problems at first seem more aesthetic than hu- 



142 CHAPTER FOUR 




The Whitney Museum's 
1985-86 exhibit. High Styles: 
Twentieth Century Furniture 
Design, was designed by Rob- 
ert Venturi. 



manitarian, though it could be argued that any project that 
shows how to put information in clearer prose and better 
graphics has done a great service. At least one project had far- 
reaching results: the Federal Design Improvement Program, a 
major project undertaken by the Design Arts Program in the 
seventies, improved visual communication in many federal 
agencies. Sign systems are graphics, too, and grantees have 
developed improved systems to orient people in complex 
structures — museums, airports, subways and malls; the inter- 
pretive sign system for Denver's Platte River Greenway helps 
people enjoy a natural area without disturbing it. 

In industrial design, the University of Michigan conducted 
the Competitive Edge, a program to demonstrate to execu- 
tives and business schools the economic benefits of good de- 
sign and to encourage corporations to integrate designers into 
the management structure. The Design Management Insti- 
tute created design case histories for business schools and 
corporate executives to demonstrate how design can be a 
resource in accomplishing business objectives. Exhibitions 
paid homage to the design elegance of everyday things — for 
example, the Minneapolis Society of Fine Arts mounted The 
Hardware Store. High-style product design was the subject of 
an exhibition at the Whitney Museum; the furniture designs 
of Mario Bellini were featured at the Museum of Modern Art; 
and Friends of the Schindler House explored the past and 
future of plywood furniture design. 

In interior design, the Buffalo Organization for Social and 
Technological Innovation published research showing that the 
design of the work environment has a direct impact on em- 
ployees' productivity and job satisfaction. The Better Belle- 
vue Association suggested design improvements to ease the 
anxiety of patients in labor and delivery rooms. Other interior 
designers studied the effects of windows on workers, the im- 
portance of light and color in hospitals and mental health 
facilities and the special design considerations of health-care 
facilities for children. 

Designers have been instrumental in bringing down barriers 
for handicapped persons. A typical grant in this area went to 
Drexel University for the design of attractive clothing for the 
physically handicapped. Other grantees worked on such 
projects as safer bathrooms, design of indoor and outdoor 
environments for mentally retarded persons, design for a na- 
ture trail for physically handicapped persons, housing for 
elderly and disabled adults, a sensory-guidance system to 
guide visually impaired persons in public buildings and the 
design of play equipment for both able-bodied and disabled 
children. 

The sum is an impressive array of problems addressed and 
aesthetic solutions found — enough to remind anyone, in Bill 
Lacy's words, "of the benefits that can accrue from the 
thoughtful application of design to human problems." 



DESIGN FOR INDIVIDUALS 143 



Housing Solutions 

Housing designs that address and accommodate users' needs. 
Includes ergonomics, prototypes of new homes and improved 
furnishings and fixtures. 



Adier, Gail 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R8M2-42N 

Contact: PO. Box 277, 

Window Rock, AZ 86515 



Association of Science and 
Technology Centers 
FY 1981 
$15,000 
12-4250-193 
Contact: Assistant 
Coordinator, Traveling 
Exhibits, Association of 
Science and Technology 
Centers, 1016 16th Street, 
N.W., Washington, DC 
20036 



Beckley, Robert M. 
FY 1981 
$5,000 
11-4213-081 
Contact: 3232 North 
Summit Avenue, 
Milwaukee, Wl 53211 



Behr, Richard A. 

FY 1981 

$3,972 

11-4212-214 

Contact: 4602 50th Street, 

Apt. 150, Lubbock, TX 

79414 



Bender, Stephen O. 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R8I-42-28N 

Contact: 48 1 5 Caroline, 

Houston, TX 77004 



Center Screen, Inc. 

FY 1982 

$35,000 

22-4250-227 

Contact: Director, Center 

Screen, Inc., c/o 

Urbanimage Corporation, 

253 Summer Street, Boston, 

MA 02210 



For an analysis of Navajo preferences 
and needs in the design of housing. The 
aim was to assist local policy-makers and 
the individual Navajo who intended to 
live in government-designed housing or a 
house of his or her own design. 



To prepare and circulate a design exhi- 
bition on the architecture of five villages 
in Nepal. The exhibit emphasized the 
relationships among house form, environ- 
ment and human behavior. 



To undertake a critical analysis of the 
mobile home as an alternative to conven- 
tional housing. 



To design and perform structural 
analyses on dome building systems in or- 
der to improve earth-sheltered housing. 



To conduct field studies of present-day 
squatter settlements in the American 
Southwest. The aim of the project was to 
define the issues surrounding their devel- 
opment in order to help resolve the hous- 
ing problems the inhabitants of these set- 
tlements face. A report resulted from the 
studies. 



To produce a videotape entitled "The 
Yen for Housing." The film examines an 
emerging trend in Japanese domestic ar- 
chitecture: the use of American 2x4 
wood-frame construction and prefab- 
ricated structures. 



City of Los Angeles 

FY 1979 

$15,000 

92-4233-179 

Contact: Director, Planning 

Department, 200 North 

Spring Street, Los Angeles, 

C A 90012 



Coalition for the Homeless, 
Inc. 

FY 1985 
$20,000 

52-4231-0052.06 
Contact: President, 
Coalition for the Homeless, 
Inc., 105 East 22nd Street, 
New York, NY 10010 



Cooper-Marcus, Clare 
FY 1977 
$10,000 
R71-42-22N 
Contact: University of 
California, Department of 
Landscape Architecture, 
Berkeley, CA 94720 



Cultural Council 

Foundation 

FY 1986 

$10,000 

86-4256-0098 

Contact: Manager of 

Programs, Cultural Council 

Foundation, 625 Broadway, 

New York, NY 10012 



De Souza-Santos, Adele 

Maria 

FY 1977 

$6,500 

R71-42-15N 

Contact: Pare 4, Apt. 1 105, 

3614 Montrose, Houston, 

TX 77006 



Design Coalition, Inc. 

FY 1982 

$30,200 

22-4250-133 

Contact: President, Design 

Coalition, Inc., 1201 

Williamson Street, Madison, 

WI 53703 



To design a holistic low-income housing 
structure in Venice, California. The de- 
sign incorporates manufactured housing, 
trailers, membrane structures, solar en- 
ergy, greenhouses, drip irrigation and 
natural water collection. A report enti- 
tled The Green Machine Feasibility 
Study resulted. 



For design services required to renovate 
an unused building in Washington, D.C., 
as a shelter for the homeless. 



To develop a compendium of user needs 
in multifamily housing for use by design 
professionals. The aim was to act as a 
stimulus for a more thoughtful, socially 
responsive approach to housing design. 



For an exposition and symposium on de- 
sign solutions to aid the homeless, includ- 
ing presentations of existing and pro- 
posed models for temporary shelters, 
transitional and low-income housing. 



To study the evolution of suburban ste- 
reotypes over the last four decades by 
examining the relationship of developer- 
built single-family homes to changing so- 
cial, cultural and economic factors. A 
summary report was issued. 



To produce a film documenting a self- 
help home design and building process in 
Mexicali, Mexico, which was aided by 
U.S. consultants. A report was also pro- 
duced to aid organizers of community 
self-help housing efforts, and it includes 
a case study from Nairobi. 



144 CHAPTER FOUR 



Ecumenical Association for 

Housing 

FY 1987 

$19,500 

87-1251-0012 

Conlacl: Executive Director, 

Ecumenical Association for 

Housing, 1510 Fifth 

Avenue, San Rafael, CA 

94901 



Fly, La Barbara W. 

FY 1980 

$5,000 

01-4214-018 

Contact: ?.0. Box 1012, 

Austin, TX 78767 



Goldstein, Barbara S. 
FY 1983 
$5,000 

31-4213-00013 
Contact: Editor, L.A. 
Architect, 940 North 
Serrano Avenue, Los 
Angeles, CA 90029 



Gutman, Robert 

FY 1978 

$9,850 

R81-42-54CN 

Contact: 200 Hun Road, 

Princeton. NJ 08540 



Hillside Trust 

FY 1984 

$30,000 

42-4257-0069 

Contact: President, The 

Hillside Trust, 3012 Section 

Road at French Park, 

Cincinnati, OH 45237 



Holl, Steven M. 

FY 1982 

$5,000 

21-4213-175 

Contact: Associate Professor 

of Design, Columbia 

University, 655 Sixth 

Avenue, Apt. 214, New 

York, NY 10010 



To study the practical issues involved in 
combining housing for non-traditional 
family units with a system of shared ser- 
vices. In these, single parents, working 
couples or the elderly would live in pri- 
vately owned units and share common 
spaces and services: cooked meals, main- 
tenance help, child and health care. 



To study the form and structure of the 
typical kodgaon house which exists in 
the border region of Nepal and India. 



To develop criteria for a new Case Study 
House Program and a design compe- 
tition. The original program focused on 
single-family housing (1945-1966). This 
program sought to demonstrate innova- 
tions in multiple-family housing design in 
America. 



To conduct research and prepare a book 
examining the role of the architect in 
shaping the design of housing as opposed 
to the roles of developers, contractors, fi- 
nancial institutions, home buyers and 
manufacturers of building materials. The 
Design of American Housing: A Reap- 
praisal of the Architect's Role was pub- 
lished in 1985. 



To sponsor a nationwide competition to 
find environmentally sensitive designs for 
hillside housing. Over 460 designers and 
design teams participated and five first 
prizes were awarded. 



To produce Rural and Urban House 
Types in North America, the second in a 
three-part series on building types rather 
than on the history of housing styles. 



Howell, Sandra C. 

FY 1982 

$15,000 

21-4215-087 

Contact: Associate 

Professor, Massachusetts 

Institute of Technology, 

Department of Architecture, 

3-433, Cambridge, MA 

02139 



Kinzy, Scott A. 

FY 1980 

$5,000 

0M212-155 

Contact: 3302 North Weil 

Street, Milwaukee, WI 

53212 



Land, Peter D. 

FY 1984 

$15,000 

41-4213-0116 

Contact: 3001 South King 

Drive, Chicago, I L 60616 



Lewin, Susan G. 

FY 1980 

$10,000 

01-4213-172 

Contact: 188 Riverside 

Drive, No. 3B, New York, 

NY 10024 



Minneapolis Society of Fine 

Arts 

FY 1983 

$30,000 

32-4230-00084 

Contact: President, 

Minneapolis Society of Fine 

Arts, 133 East 25th Street, 

Minneapolis, MN 55404 



Morgan, William N. 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R8I-42-25N 

Contact: 320 East Forsyth 

Street, Jacksonville, FL 

32202 



Morganstern, Donna R. 

FY 1979 

$8,250 

91-4232-201 

Contact: c/o Good Sam 

Club, RO. Box 404, 

Calabasas, CA 21302 



To continue studies in preparation for a 
book on urban family lifestyles in rela- 
tion to housing design in the United 
States and Japan. A draft report. Hous- 
ing Design and Cultural Patterns in Ja- 
pan, resulted. 



To study what commercially built hous- 
ing visually communicates to consumers. 
A report. Commercially Built Housing: 
A Symbol for Society?, analyzes residen- 
tial architecture as designed by commer- 
cial builders rather than architects. 



To integrate a human-scale environment, 
energy-conscious design and reduced de- 
pendency on the automobile in low-rise/ 
high-density housing and neighborhood 
design. 



To study residential architecture since 
1 960. The aim was to show how the 
architectural values of the past decades 
can be crystallized in a study of the 
house. 



For a national architectural competition 
on the theme of new housing for nontra- 
ditional households. The competition was 
held as a single-stage design program 
with the aim of generating ideas for the 
design of small, affordable energy-effi- 
cient housing units. 



To research the history of earth architec- 
ture, including aboriginal American ar- 
chitecture (1000 BC-1500 AD). 



To study snowbirds (people who travel to 
warm climes in the winter) and similar 
American nomadic peoples, with empha- 
sis on implications for design and the so- 
cial sciences. In a report entitled Wheel 
Estate: R. V. Homes and Gardens, the 
use of the recreational vehicle as long- 
term housing was studied. 



DESIGN FOR INDIVIDUALS 145 



Museum of Contemporary 

Art 

FY 1985 

$40,000 

52-4256-0165 

Contact: Administrator, 

Museum of Contemporary 

Art, 414 Boyd Street, Los 

Angeles, C A 90013 



McHenry, Paul C, Jr. 

FY 1978 

$9,645 

R81-42-33N 

Contact: RO. Drawer 706, 

Corrales, NM 87048 



New Alchemy Institute 
FY 1985 
$30,000 
52-4231-0026 
Contact: Director, New 
Alchemy Institute, 237 
Hatchville Road, East 
Falmouth, MA 02543 



New Communities Services, 

Inc. 

FY 1982 

$27,693 

22^252-074 

Contact: Administrator, 

New Communities Services, 

Inc., 116 Norfolk Street, 

Cambridge, MA 02139 



New Jersey Institute of 
Technology 
FY 1986 
$40,000 
86^252-0129 
Contact: Associate Vice- 
President for Academic 
Aflfairs, New Jersey 
Institute of Technology, 
Newark, N J 07102 



Ohanian, Richard 

FY 1979 

$5,000 

91-4231-207 

Contact: 1451 Aven Drive, 

Columbus, OH 43227 



For an exhibit on the Case Study House 
Program, which was spearheaded by 
Arts & Architecture magazine between 
1945 and 1966. Through the program 
nineteen Los Angeles architects created 
prototypes for "average" postwar subur- 
ban families, resulting in twenty-three 
case studies and nine designs. 



To prepare a guide to the construction of 
simple housing in arid lands. The aim 
was to illustrate practical design solu- 
tions using materials commonly found in 
arid zones. 



To develop prototype bioshelters: living 
environments that integrate space for liv- 
ing and working as well as capabilities 
for growing food crops and storing and 
using solar energy. Results were pub- 
lished in two issues of the New Alchemy 
Quarterly. 



To explore design issues pertaining to 
congregate housing for the elderly. Con- 
gregate housing represents an alternative 
to traditional dwellings: residents share 
common and public spaces while still 
maintaining their independence in pri- 
vate quarters. A report evaluated thir- 
teen existing models. 



To gather information on changes in low- 
income housing design and policy be- 
tween 1937 and 1987. Newark, New Jer- 
sey, was taken as a case study, and 
projects in other cities were examined as 
well. The aim was to analyze the process 
by which architecture and planning con- 
cepts are translated into housing policy. 



To develop designs for earth-sheltered 
homes. A report, entitled Earth Homes, 
was also produced. 



Pennsylvania Stale 

University 

FY 1977 

$15,000 

R70-42-171 

Contact: Project Director, 

Pennsylvania State 

University, Department of 

Landscape Architecture, 

1140 Arts Building, 

University Park, PA 16802 



Pittsburgh Presbytery 
FY 1983 
$10,000 
32-4252-00130 
Contact: Associate 
Executive, Pittsburgh 
Presbytery, Committee on 
Aging, 801 Union Avenue, 
Pittsburgh, PA 



Plesums, Guntis 

FY 1982 

$10,000 

21-4213-103 

Contact: Associate Professor 

of Architecture, University 

of Oregon, Eugene, OR 

97403 



Quenette, Larry C. 

FY 1987 

$10,000 

87-4216-0151 

Contact: 600 South Grand 

Avenue West, Springfield. 

IL 62704 



Regents of the University of 

Colorado 

FY 1983 

$10,000 

32^250-00100 

Contact: Assistant Professor, 

University of Colorado, 

College of Design, Campus 

Box 314, Denver, CO 80309 



To develop design standards for the sit- 
ing of mobile home parks and modular 
housing developments in rural Pennsylva- 
nia. The aim was to provide a basis for 
community design and planning, zoning 
and subdivision regulations. 



Sanders, James B. 

FY 1980 

$5,000 

01-4214-019 

Contact: 2 1 1 East 70th 

Street, No. 19B, New York, 

NY 10021 



To develop guidelines for effective plan- 
ning and design of shared living environ- 
ments for the elderly. Such arrangements 
have met with resistance in the past as 
people fear the loss of privacy. Issues 
and solutions were examined through 
several examples in the Pittsburgh area, 
and a report. Homes to Share, was is- 
sued. 



To document the design method that de- 
fines the structural qualities of the Japa- 
nese folkhouse. The aim was to demon- 
strate how this method can serve as a 
model for contemporary high-density 
housing. The research resulted in a re- 
port, Space Structuring Principles in the 
Japanese Folkhouse. 



To design a self-contained inpatient facil- 
ity for terminally ill persons. The aim 
was to research and develop standards 
for a prototype hospice cottage. 



To create an information planning kit to 
provide rural communities with design 
alternatives for mobile home site devel- 
opment to enable them to enhance the vi- 
sual character of their environments. A 
book entitled Mobile Homes in Rural 
Communities: A Planning and Design 
Workbook was published (written by Al- 
lan Wallis). 



For a study of eight subsidized housing 
developments in New York City over the 
past decade. The projects were designed 
in response to both the surrounding com- 
munities' and their residents' needs. The 
aim was to show how designers have at- 
tempted to make housing a socially re- 
sponsive art. 



146 CHAPTER FOUR 



Sauer. Louis 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R81-42^1N 

Contact: 1621 Cypress 

Street, Philadelphia, PA 

19103 



Sculpture in the 

Environment, Inc. 

FY 1981 

$10,000 

12-4230-273 

Contact: Partner, Sculpture 

in the Environment, Inc. 

(SITE), 83 Spring Street, 

New York, NY 10012 



Sculpture in the 

Environment, Inc. 

FY 1982 

$10,000 

22-4230-032 

Contact: President, 

Sculpture in the 

Environment, Inc. (SITE), 

83 Spring Street, New 

York, NY 10012 



Sengupta, Asit N. 

FY 1981 

$9,000 

1M2 13-268 

Contact: University of 

Southwestern Louisiana, 

Box 4-3850, Lafayette, LA 

70504 



Southern California 

Institute of Architects 

FY 1986 

$40,000 

86-4252-0059 

Contact: Director, Southern 

California Institute of 

Architecu, 1800 Berkeley 

Street, Santa Monica, CA 

90404 



Southern Illinois University 

FY 1982 

$15,210 

22^230-212 

Contact: Southern Illinois 

University, Board of 

Trustees, Carbondale, IL 

62901 



To document critical issues pertaining to 
the design of residential housing and to 
prepare descriptive case studies. A 
project summary outlined the research 
results. 



To conduct a feasibility study of an ex- 
perimental high-rise dwelling that affords 
residents the opportunity to enjoy the 
cultural advantages of an urban center 
without having to sacrifice the private 
home identity and yard space associated 
with suburbia. A traveling exhibit was 
also produced. 



For the design of an urban multiple- 
dwelling complex for mixed-income resi- 
dents. The project was envisioned as a 
vertical community of private homes 
clustered in village-like communities. A 
booklet documenting the project was pro- 
duced. 



To perform research on design concepts 
and methods that allow maximum par- 
ticipation of the elderly in the design of 
their housing or living spaces. Seven 
housing complexes were studied, and a 
report was published, Design of Elderly 
Housing Environments Through First- 
hand Participation. 



To build and document a more durable 
prototype adobe structure, a method of 
housing construction and design that is 
attractive and inexpensive as well as cul- 
turally and environmentally appropriate. 



To create design options for housing for 
the elderly, including collective green- 
houses, layout and land use, marketing 
facilities and management needs. A 
video and a report, Places for the El- 
derly to Grow, were produced. 



Torre, Susana 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

91-4232-203 

Contact: The Architecture 

Studio, 39 West 54th 

Street, New York, NY 

10019 



United South End 

Settlements 

FY 1979 

$15,820 

92^233-081 

Contact: Associate Director, 

United South End 

Settlements, 566 Columbia 

Avenue, Boston, MA 02118 



To develop architectural criteria that re- 
flect and respond to the changes in fam- 
ily structures in present-day society. 



University of Illinois 

FY 1977 

$5,000 

R7042-59 

Contact: Professor, 

University of Illinois, 1204 

West Nevada, Urbana, IL 

61801 



University of Illinois 

FY 1981 

$35,000 

12-4252-209 

Contact: Professor of 

Architecture, University of 

Illinois, 608 East Lorado 

Taft Drive, Champaign, IL 

61820 



University of Illinois 

FY 1983 

$39,975 

32^252-00055 

Contact: Director, Housing 

Research Program, 

University of Illinois, 1204 

West Nevada, Urbana, IL 

61801 



University of Illinois 
FY 1983 
$18,700 
32-4252-00190 
Contact: Professor, 
University of Illinois, 
Housing Research and 
Development, 1204 West 
Nevada, Urbana, IL 61801 



To explore issues associated with congre- 
gate housing for low-income elderly and 
handicapped persons. It has been found 
that in existing projects, social interac- 
tion among residents is quite low. A 
study focused on projects in the South 
End/Lower Roxbury neighborhood in 
Boston and developed design criteria for 
improved facilities. 



To prepare visual materials to illustrate a 
report on publicly assisted housing devel- 
opments. The aim was to translate statis- 
tical information in the study into easily 
understood visual formats. A slide pro- 
gram and descriptive material were pro- 
duced. 



For research on post-occupancy evalua- 
tion, the assessment of a building in use 
vis-a-vis its original design premises. The 
aim was to bring an interdisciplinary ap- 
proach to post-occupancy evaluations. 



For an ongoing study of residents' prior- 
ities for the design of multifamily hous- 
ing. The aim was to generate a process 
for determining occupant priorities for 
specific architectural and landscape de- 
sign features. 



To develop options for landscaping 
homes for the developmentally disabled 
located in residential neighborhoods. The 
aim was to create design features for ex- 
terior spaces that would render these 
homes more acceptable to both neighbors 
and residents. An illustrated report re- 
sulted. 



DESIGN FOR INDIVIDUALS 147 



University of New Mexico 
FY 1980 
$19,974 
02-4252-147 
Contact: Associate 
Professor, University of 
New Mexico, Institute for 
Environmental Education, 
Albuquerque, NM 87131 



University of New Mexico 

FY 1981 

$1,600 

12-4211-130 

Contact: Associate 

Professor, Graduate Studio, 

University of Mexico, 2414 

Central, S.E., Albuquerque, 

NM87I3I 



University of Southern 

California 

FY 1983 

$39,132 

32-4252-00054 

Contact: Provost, Academic 

Affairs, University of 

Southern California, 

University Park, Los 

Angeles, CA 90089 



University of Washington 

FY 1983 

$5,000 

32-4252-00133 

Contact: Project Director, 

University of Washington, 

Seattle, WA 98195 



Utah Arts Council 
FY 1983 
$20,000 
32-4250-00120 
Contact: Director, Utah 
Arts Council, 617 East 
South Temple Street, Salt 
Lake City, UT 84102 



Vera Institute of Justice 

FY 1983 

$27,740 

32-423a<X)173 

Contact: Project Director, 

Vera Institute of Justice, 30 

East 39th Street, New 

York, NY 10016 



To prepare post-occupancy evaluation 
handbooks for six buildings in Albuquer- 
que. Six booklets were produced and dis- 
seminated to the relevant government 
agencies and to private organizations. 



To investigate how local materials may 
be used to lower housing costs in Nicara- 
gua. Slides and a report documented the 
project. 



To establish criteria for site planning and 
design of housing for the elderly that in- 
corporate outdoor space as an integral el- 
ement. 



To study how the density of housing 
developments can be increased by adding 
apartments to single-family homes while 
maintaining the quality of neighborhood 
environments. Housing experts synthe- 
sized proposals in an illustrated report. 



For an exhibit of model houses designed 
through collaborations of architects, de- 
signers and craftspeople. The aim was to 
show how the inclusion of handmade 
crafts can be an integral element in hous- 
ing design, rather than an afterthought. 



To create models for single-room occu- 
pancy facilities. The aim was to suggest 
appropriate design solutions to house in- 
digent inner-city populations. Several re- 
ports, a video and bibliography 
documented types of structures, rooms 
and furnishings. 



Wolfe, Alan R. 

FY 1981 

$4,000 

1M212-216 

Contact: Florida A&M 

University, School of 

Architecture, PO. Box 597, 

Tallahassee, FL 32307 



Yeh, Raymond W. H. 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R81-42-39N 

Contact: University of 

Oklahoma, School of 

Architecture, Norman, OK 

73019 



To study emerging technologies that uti- 
lize waste materials in the manufacture 
of building products. The aim was to 
document means of lowering housing 
construction costs. 



For a study of subterranean structures in 
the Midwest. The aim was to collect in- 
formation on construction methods, en- 
ergy conservation and uses as tornado 
shelters. A report was issued following 
the investigation. 



Interior Design 

Design projects to improve the quality of the home, work 
and institutional environments. Also includes studies to re- 
store historic interiors. 



American Society of 

Interior Designers (ASID) 

Education Foundation 

FY 1978 

$28,000 

R80-42-I13 

Contact: Director of 

Education, ASID Education 

Foundation, 730 Fifth 

Avenue, New York, NY 

10019 



American Society of 

Interior Designers 

Education Foundation 

FY 1978 

$14,900 

R80-42-130C 

Contact: ASID Education 

Foundation. 730 Fifth 

Avenue, New York, NY 

10013 



American Society of 
Interior Designers 
Education Foundation 
FY 1981 
$15,000 
12-4221-136 
Contact: Chairperson, 
Chapter Services. ASID 
Education Foundation, 730 
Fifth Avenue, New York, 
NY 10019 



For a nationwide interior design intern- 
ship program. The aim was to provide re- 
cent graduates with learning experiences 
and a broad range of technical and cre- 
ative skills that might not otherwise be 
afforded an individual in an entry-level 
work situation. 



To organize an exhibition on the design 
elements and furnishings of Radio City 
Music Hall in an effort to gain support 
for preservation of the building. 



For a program to train and motivate inte- 
rior designers to assume more active 
roles in public service and to extend ex- 
isting cooperative efforts with commu- 
nity design centers. 



148 CHAPTER FOUR 



American Society of 

Interior Designers 

Education Foundation 

FY 1981 

$26,000 

12-4221-137 

Contact: Project Director, 

Significant Interiors, ASID 

Education Foundation, 730 

Fifth Avenue, New York, 

NY 10019 



American Society of 

Interior Designers 

Education Foundation 

FY 1983 

$10,000 

32-4250-00094 

Contact: Executive Director, 

ASID Education 

Foundation, 1430 

Broadway, New York City, 

NY 10018 



American Society of 

Interior Designers 

Education Foundation 

FY 1987 

$15,825 

87-4251-0061 

Contact: Executive Director, 

ASID Education 

Foundation, 1430 

Broadway, New York, NY 

10018 



Association for the Care of 

Children's Health 

FY 1984 

$50,000 

42-4256-0042 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Association for the Care of 

Children's Health, 3615 

Wisconsin Avenue N.W., 

Washington, DC 20016 



Better Bellevue Association 
FY 1983 
$11,920 
32^252-00052 
Contact: Director, 
Environmental Research, 
Better Bellevue Association, 
Administration Building, 
Room 233, 27th Street and 
First Avenue, New York, 
NY 10016 



Buffalo Organization for 

Social and Technological 

Innovation (BOSTI) 

FY 1979 

$15,582 

92-4212-140 

Contact: BOSTI, 1479 

Hertel Avenue, Buffalo, NY 

14216 



To prepare materials for the Survey of 
Significant Interiors, a project aimed at 
preservation of historic interior spaces. 



For the Survey of Significant Interiors. 
Seven hundred historic interiors in New 
York City were identified, researched 
and documented in a computer database 
under the project. Surveys were com- 
pleted in twenty-one other cities as well. 



For a traveling exhibit on significant 
American interiors. The exhibit was part 
of a larger effort to heighten public 
awareness of quality interior design and 
to promote the preservation of interior as 
well as exterior features of landmark 
buildings. 



To produce a film and report on the de- 
sign of child health care facilities. The 
film, A Space to Care, gives examples of 
design excellence in these facilities and 
illustrates basic principles. A book enti- 
tled Child Health-Care Facilities was 
published in 1987. 



For an analysis of the obstetrics environ- 
ment, particularly the labor and delivery 
environment. The research report focuses 
on how the physical setting affects the 
mother's anxiety and suggests architec- 
tural and design improvements. 



To publish a set of illustrated guidelines 
on ofliice design. The guidelines focus on 
the direct impact of design on employ- 
ees' productivity and job satisfaction. 



Buffalo Organization for 

Social and Technological 

Innovation 

FY 1981 

$15,000 

12-4252-207 

Contact: President, BOSTI, 

1479 Hertel Avenue, 

Buffalo, NY 14216 



Buffalo Organization for 

Social and Technological 

Innovation 

FY 1983 

$20,000 

32-4250-00027 

Contact: President, BOSTI, 

1479 Hertel Avenue, 

Buffalo, NY 14216 



Buffalo Organization for 

Social and Technological 

Innovation 

FY 1983 

$15,000 

32-4252-00124 

Contact: President, BOSTI, 

1479 Hertel Avenue, 

Buffalo, NY 14216 



Buffalo Organization for 

Social and Technological 

Innovation 

FY 1987 

$26,000 

87-4251-0017 

Contact: Office Manager, 

BOSTI, 1479 Hertel 

Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14216 



Braybrooke, Susan R. 

FY 1981 

$10,000 

11-4210013 

Contact: One Christopher 

Street, New York, NY 

10014 



Brukoff, Barry 

FY 1979 

$5,000 

9M232-099 

Contact: 1620 Montgomery 

Street, San Francisco, CA 

94111 



To conduct research on the relationship 
between environmental aesthetics and 
job satisfaction and productivity. A two- 
volume book. Using Office Design to In- 
crease Productivity, was published in 
1984 and 1985. It was written by Mi- 
chael Brill with Stephen T Margulis, El- 
len Konar and BOSTI. 



For a study measuring the economic 
benefits of design changes in oflfice envi- 
ronments. 



To research the effect proximity to win- 
dows has on the productivity and health 
of office workers. The issue is particu- 
larly important as larger office floors 
limit direct access to natural light and 
views. 



To research and publish Using Office 
Design to Increase Productivity for the 
Small Business. The manual diagnoses 
facility problems that affect staff perfor- 
mance, satisfaction and communication. 
It also offers design guidelines for small 
business offices, including planning for 
new business technologies. 



For a draft of a textbook on the physical 
design of research facilities. The design 
of research laboratories over the last fif- 
teen years was investigated and the pre- 
vailing program requirements and design 
trends analyzed. 



To formulate designs and plans for a hos- 
pice in Marin County, California. A 
$4,000 amendment, grant number 1 1- 
4213-221, was made in 1981. 



DESIGN FOR INDIVIDUALS 149 



Carpenter, James F. 
FY 1983 
$10,000 
31-4213-00009 
Contact: President, James 
Carpenter Design 
Associates, The Crystal 
Building, 47 West Street, 
New York, NY 10006 



Drexel University 

FY 1980 

$6,525 

02-4250-222 

Contact: Assistant Professor, 

Drexel University, 32nd and 

Chestnut Streets, 

Philadelphia, PA 19104 



Feiner, George Leopold 

FY 1984 

$10,000 

41-4213-0131 

Contact: 11940Burbank 

Boulevard, No. 1 2A, North 

Hollywood, CA 91607 



Filkins, Sarah K. 

FY 1987 

$9,500 

87-4216-0150 

Contact: 643 Shore Road, 

Severna Park, MD21146 



Friedmann, Arnold A. 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

91-4232-239 

Contact: 42 North Maple 

Street, Hadley, MA 



Glover, Raymond 

FY 1982 

$3,000 

21-4212-083 

Contact: 1 70 York Street, 

Apt. 2, New Haven, CT 

06511 



To Study the decorative and design as- 
pects of new types of glass used in build- 
ing construction. Recent technologies 
have produced energy-saving kinds of 
glass; however, little consideration has 
gone into their aesthetic impact on interi- 
ors. The aim is to identify ways of using 
these to improve light transmission as 
well as insulation in buildings. 



To evaluate a course for students of inte- 
rior design in conjunction with the Moss 
Rehabilitation Hospital. The aim was to 
devise a curriculum affording designers, 
handicapped persons and rehabilitation 
personnel a better understanding of how 
space can be designed to meet the needs 
of the handicapped. 



For the development of an interreflective 
theory of light. The premise of 
interreflection is that maximum use of 
daylight can be a major determinant of 
form in architecture. Application of the 
theory may help reduce the lighting costs 
of museums, galleries and hospitals and 
result in new building forms. 



To research historic interiors in Annapo- 
lis, Maryland. For three centuries An- 
napolis has been a center of government, 
academic and maritime activity, and it 
contains a diverse mix of building peri- 
ods and styles. However, as development 
and growth continue, the irreplaceable 
interior architecture is disappearing. 



To prepare a series of essays on interior 
design criticism. The series was titled Es- 
says About Ordinary Spaces. 



For a study of architectural elements and 
daylight in buildings. The effects of win- 
dow proportion, location and ceiling 
height were documented in a report as 
well as in computer programs and scale 
models. 



Institute for Continuing 

Educational Design 

Management and 

Communications 

FY 1979 

$113,500 

C A 79-15 

Contact: Institute for 

Continuing Educational 

Design Management and 

Communications, 1112 

Sixth Street, N.W., 

Washington, DC 20001 



Iowa State University 
FY 1982 
$18,472 
22-4252-076 
Contact: Associate 
Professor, Iowa State 
University, College of 
Design, Room 1 58, Ames, 
lA 50011 



Margaret Gate Institute 

FY 1983 

$8,000 

32-4250-00075 

Contact: Project Director, 

Margaret Gate Institute, 

Bay Crest, Huntington, NY 

11743 



Mills College 

FY 1987 

$15,000 

87-4251-0111 

Contact: President, Mills 

College, 5000 MacArthur 

Boulevard, Oakland, CA 

94613 



To hold four design seminars for design- 
ers in federal agencies in order to ac- 
quaint them with. recent techniques in 
graphic design and interior design. 



To develop and test a design process 
called the "tradeoff technique," a 
method for predicting needs of people 
who use buildings. The goal was to en- 
able design clients to express what they 
expected from a space in laymen's terms 
and aid interior designers in identifying 
and accommodating human needs. 



, For design, printing and dissemination of 
the institute's design guidelines on color 
systems for institutional environments 
such as hospitals and mental health facil- 
ities. The materials represent many years 
of color and related human-factor re- 
search. 



For an exhibition presenting the work of 
seven furniture designers from the San 
Francisco Bay Area in environmental 
settings. 




The interior of the adobe Church of San Jose de Gracia at 
Las Trampas, New Mexico, has recently been restored. 



150 CHAPTER FOUR 



Nelson, George 

FY 1984 

$15,000 

41-4213-0118 

Contact: 34 Gramercy Park, 

New York. NY 10003 



Pollronieri. Laura K. 

FY 1985 

$5,000 

51-4213-0055 

Contact: 455 Franklin 

Street. Apt. 4, Buffalo, NY 

14202 



Sky. Allison 

FY 1984 

$10,000 

4M213-0148 

Contact: 65 Bleecker Street, 

New York, NY 10012 



Smith. F Eugene 

FY 1981 

$8,500 

11-4213-106 

Contact: 3653 Yellow Creek 

Road. Akron. OH 44313 



Spivak. Mayer D. 

FY 1981 

$5,000 

1M213-111 

Contact: 84 Washington 

Park, Newtonville, MA 

02160 



Texas Tech University 

FY 1983 

$5,000 

32-4252-00132 

Contact: Chairperson. Texas 

Tech University. Housing 

and Interior Design. RO. 

Box 4170. Lubbock, TX 

74901 



University of Arizona 
FY 1986 
$22,700 
86-4252-0133 
Contact: Associate Vice- 
President for Research, 
University of Arizona, 
Tucson, AZ 85721 



To conduct a study on offices and office 
workers. The aim was to isolate and clar- 
ify the factors and values with which de- 
signers work rather than to arrive at new 
designs. 



To continue developing guidelines for the 
design of childbearing centers — an alter- 
native to in-hospital births for low-risk 
deliveries. A report covered design issues 
ranging from location to optimal interior 
design. 



To create various treatments of architec- 
tural features such as walls, ceilings, win- 
dows and doors to convey a sense of con- 
text, use and place. 



To reexamine existing residential housing 
systems in order to suggest designs for 
more flexible interior systems, for exam- 
ple, to redesign kitchen and bathroom 
systems built a century ago so they work 
more efficiently. 



To study light and color and their eff"ects 
on the perceptions and behaviors of us- 
ers. The resulting report included a set of 
design guidelines for light and color that 
focused on institutional use but are appli- 
cable to all settings. 



To study interior design aspects of solar 
design. A research report analyzed three 
basic passive design concepts, direct 
gain, sun space and indirect gain. It also 
considered materials that provide ther- 
mal mass in interior construction and 
other interior components such as fur- 
nishings, fabric and window coverings. 



To study Scandinavian office design and 
to apply principles used there to improve 
American office design. The project ad- 
dressed planning, principles of layout, 
space allocation, materials, degree of en- 
closure and communication. 



University of Michigan 
FY 1982 
$27,370 
22-4252-077 
Contact: Professor of 
Architecture, Architecture 
Research Laboratory, 
University of Michigan, 
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 



University of Wisconsin, 

Milwaukee 

FY 1985 

$27,520 

52-4252-0133 

Contact: Associate Dean, 

University of Wisconsin, 

Milwaukee. Graduate 

School. PO. Box 340. 

Milwaukee, WI 53201 



To develop a layman's game for pro- 
gramming open space office design. Re- 
search aimed to identify the aesthetic, 
functional and status needs of workers 
and to incorporate these into a "trade- 
off' game. 



To study the design implications of con- 
ducting one's professional life from the 
home. A report was produced entitled 
Blurring Boundaries: Socio-Spatial Con- 
sequences of Working at Home. The re- 
port addressed potential design problems 
in living and working patterns brought on 
by the independence provided by the per- 
sonal computer. 



Industrial Design 

Product designs, end-user studies and ergonomics. Includes 
exhibits, seminars and studies highlighting the contributions 
of industrial designers. 



Adelman, Robert M. 

FY 1985 

$8,500 

5M213-0142 

Contact: 151 West 28th 

Street, New York, NY 

10001 



American Federation of 

Arts 

FY 1980 

$21,000 

02-4250-064 

Contact: Director, American 

Federation of Arts, 41 East 

65th Street, New York, NY 

10021 



American Red Cross 

FY 1984 

$10,000 

42-4231-0065 

Contact: Vice-President, 

American Red Cross, 1 7th 

and D Streets, N.W. 

Washington, DC 20006 



For a book of photographs on the design 
values of ordinary objects designed and 
made in America, for example, the 
Shaker clothespin, the paperclip, the 
computer chip, the balloon-frame house. 
The aim was to show their simplicity, ef- 
ficiency and design ingenuity. 



To plan an exhibition on American prod- 
uct design entitled A Paperclip and 299 
Other Things. A $4,200 amendment was 
made in 1981, grant number 02-4250- 
064.1 



To design and develop a prototype disas- 
ter services vehicle. The design process 
drew heavily on the Red Cross staffs ex- 
pertise in meeting emergency service 
needs. A research report and video were 
produced. 



DESIGN FOR INDIVIDUALS 151 



Becker, William S. 

FY 1979 

$5,000 

91-4232-097 

Contact: Associate 

Professor, Industrial Design, 

School of Art and Design, 

University of Illinois, 

Chicago, IL 60680 



Best, Melvin H. M. 

FY 1981 

$8,000 

11-4215-118 

Contact: Industrial 

Designer, 23124 Saddle 

Peak Road, Topanga, CA 

90290 



City of Walnut Creek 

FY 1979 

$6,130 

92-4212-158 

Contact: Gallery Specialist, 

Civic Art Gallery, 1445 

Civic Drive, Walnut Creek, 

CA 94596 



Cranbrook Academy of Art 

FY 1982 

$7,500 

22-4250-046 

Contact: Program Director, 

Design Michigan, 500 Lone 

Pine Road, PO. Box 801, 

Bloomfield Hills, MI 48013 



Danko, Peter 

FY 1980 

$10,000 

01-4210-226 

Contact: 97 King Street, 

Alexandria, VA 22314 



To design, build and test a solar-efficient 
greenhouse for rooftop sites. The design 
is suitable for mass production. 



David, Thomas W. 
FY 1986 
$10,000 
86-4213-0046 
Contact: 2 Lynn Court, 
Morristown, NJ 07960 



For the design of a lightweight bicycle 
that folds down to fit inside a briefcase. 
The bicycle design provides an alterna- 
tive means of transportation, saving en- 
ergy and enhancing physical fitness. 



For an exhibition, catalogue and lecture 
on the working process of industrial de- 
signers in the San Francisco Bay Area 
and the effect of their products on the 
quality of life. The exhibit was entitled 
Hardware Arts — From Drawing Board 
to Marketplace. 



To initiate the Industrial Design In- 
formation Program to help Michigan 
manufacturers learn how they can im- 
prove, develop and market more compet- 
itive products. The program included lec- 
tures, presentations and site visits by 
industrial designers to Michigan manu- 
facturers. 



To design and produce wooden furniture 
prototypes using design techniques em- 
ployed by other industries. New methods 
of bonding and hinging groove-molded 
plywood folding chairs were experi- 
mented with, and the application of the 
die-cutting process to production of 
wooden furniture was studied. 



To continue research for a catalogue of 
the Singer Industrial Design Archive, a 
3,000-piece archive that has been made 
available for scholarly research on indus- 
trial design. The collection shows the 
evolution of a prototypical American 
product, the sewing machine, over a pe- 
riod of 1 30 years. 



Design Foundation 

FY 1980 

$7,700 

02^221-201 

Contact: Chairman, 

Industrial Design Society of 

America Awards, The 

Design Foundation, 1 7 1 7 N 

Street, N.W„ Washington, 

DC 20036 



Design Foundation 

FY 1985 

$29,000 

52-4256-0035 

Contact: Executive Director, 

The Design Foundation, 

Industrial Designers Society 

of America, 1 360 Beverly 

Road, McLean, VA 22101 



Design Foundation 

FY 1985 

$11,000 

52-4252-0069 

Contact: Executive Director, 

The Design Foundation, 

1 360 Beverly Road, Suite 

303, McLean, VA 22101 



Erpelding, Curtis M. 

FY 1981 

$10,000 

11-4210-015 

Contact: 8245 S.W Barnes 

Road, Portland, OR 97225 



Firicano, Albert 

FY 1982 

$5,000 

21-4213-171 

Contact: Designer, 

Massachusetts Department 

of Mental Health, 4 Parker 

Street, Maiden, MA 02148 



Friends of the Schindler 

House 

FY 1983 

$9,000 

32-4250-00033 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Friends of the Schindler 

House, 835 North Kings 

Road, Los Angeles, CA 

90069 



For the first national awards program for 
the industrial design profession. The aim 
of the program was to focus practi- 
tioners' attention on the leading achieve- 
ments in the profession. 



To publish Industrial Design Excellence, 
USA, 1985, a volume dedicated to the 
past winners of the Industrial Design Ex- 
cellence Awards (IDEA), a competition 
sponsored annually by the Industrial De- 
signers Society of America. 



To publish a special issue of Innovation, 
the journal of the Industrial Design Soci- 
ety of America, on the future of the 
field. Five industrial designers researched 
and discussed the trends and variables 
that will shape the future of industrial 
design and developed papers for publica- 
tion. 



To research knockdown design and its 
application to household and office furni- 
ture. Prototype designs for a bed, a 
three-legged stacking chair and a ladder- 
type bookcase were created. 



To develop a seating posture device to 
measure curvature of the back in seated 
positions in order to translate these into 
furniture design. The aim was to create 
comfortable, well-designed seating for 
persons with abnormal postures. 



For an exhibition exploring the past and 
future of plywood furniture design. The 
aim was to focus not only on specific ex- 
amples of plywood designs but on the 
concepts that produced them as well. 



152 CHAPTER FOUR 



Hanson, Robert L. 

FY 1982 

$10,000 

21-4213-173 

Contact: Senior Industrial 

Designer. Digital 

Equipment Corporation, 423 

Red Mountain Court, 

Colorado Springs, CO 

80919 



Industrial Design Society of 
America (IDSA) Walter 
Dorwin Teague Research 
Trust 
FY 1978 
$4,000 
R80-42-58 
Contact: Committee 
Chairman, IDSA Walter 
Dorwin Teague Research 
Trust, 1750 Old Meadow 
Road. McLean, VA 22101 



Industrial Design Society of 

America Walter Dorwin 

Teague Research Trust 

FY 1979 

$15,000 

92-4236-115 

Contact: Executive Director, 

IDSA Walter Dorwin 

Teague Research Trust, 

1717 N Street, N.W., 

Washington, DC 20036 



International Design 

Education Foundation 

FY 1980 

$17,500 

02-4250-212 

Contact: International 

Design Education 

Foundation, 5900 Wilshire 

Boulevard. Los Angeles. CA 

90036 



International Design 
Education Foundation 
FY 1980 
$15,000 
CA80-9 

Contact: President, 
International Design 
Education Foundation. 5900 
Wilshire Boulevard, Los 
Angeles. CA 90036 



International Design 

Education Foundation 

FY 1981 

$45,000 

12-4250-028 

Contact: Vice-President. 

International Design 

Education Foundation. 5900 

Wilshire Boulevard. Los 

Angeles. CA 90036 



For a study of automotive form that 
combines aerodynamics principles, indus- 
trial design techniques and interior space 
optimization concepts. The aim was to 
create functional, elegant designs that 
maximize passenger space. 



For ongoing activities to improve indus- 
trial design in America. Working com- 
mittees focused on consumers' design 
awareness, product safety, transportation 
and barrier-free design. 



For an international symposium on the 
importance of industrial design as a de- 
terminant of product success in the mar- 
ketplace. The goal was to raise awareness 
among American manufacturers of the 
economic benefits of well-designed prod- 
ucts. 



To continue development and fundraising 
for the exhibition A Paperclip and 299 
Other Things. 



For preparation and publication of a 
book on American product design. 



For consultation with design profes- 
sionals, story line development and exhi- 
bition design for the exhibit A Paperclip 
and 299 Other Things. 



Jackson, Dakota 

FY 1983 

$10,000 

31-4213-00150 

Contact: 4040 21st Street. 

Long Island City, NY 

11101 



Kansas City Art Institute 

FY 1980 

$3,200 

02-4211-189 

Contact: Chairman. Kansas 

City Art Institute. 4415 

Warwick Road. Kansas 

City. MO 641 1 1 



Knoll. Isabel Giampietro 

FY 1978 

$5,000 

R81-42-23N 

Contact: RO. Box 85, 

Purchase, NY 10577 



Ladewig, Christopher G. 
FY 1984 
$5,000 

41-4213-0125 
Contact: 82 Ivy Street, 
Providence, RI 02906 



Margaret Gate Institute 

FY 1980 

$27,925 

02-4230-093 

Contact: Project Director, 

Margaret Gate Institute, 

Bay Crest, Huntington, NY 

11743 



Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology 

FY 1979 

$26,755 

92-4212-045 

Contact: Director, 

Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology, Office of 

Sponsored Programs, 

Cambridge, MA 02139 



Mauro, Charles L. 

FY 1981 

$8,500 

11-4213-097 

Contact: 8 West 40th 

Street. Seventh Floor. New 

York. NY 10018 



To design a compact desk capable of 
serving several diverse functions: secre- 
tarial, executive or home-office use. The 
aim was to achieve maximum usefulness 
in a minimum amount of space. 



For students' investigations into the de- 
sign of everyday items, including specta- 
cles, the slide duplicator, games and the 
use of papier-mache. 



To investigate new techniques and meth- 
ods of production for industrial design 
glass. 



For an industrial design study testing 
and refining the design of safety head- 
gear that protects users' heads, eyes, ears 
and respiratory systems. The aims were 
to reduce the weight of headgear while 
increasing visibility and improving com- 
fort and fit. 



For a study applying recent develop- 
ments in automotive design to create 
public transportation vehicles (such as 
taxicabs) that are more accessible for in- 
dividuals in wheelchairs. 



To publish the Humanscale series, the 
"slide rule" of human engineering among 
the design professions. 



For a reference book for designers on hu- 
man factors design needs, information 
that is usually available only from mili- 
tary product research. A draft, Hand- 
book of High Technology Product Man- 
agement, was produced. 



DESIGN FOR INDIVIDUALS 153 



Meikle, Jeffrey L. 

FY 1981 

$4,750 

11-4213-099 

Conlaci: University of 

Texas, 303 Garrison Hall, 

Austin, TX 78712 



Minneapolis Society of Fine 

Arts 

FY 1986 

$12,000 

86-4256-0090 

Contact: Vice-President for 

Business Affairs, 

Minneapolis Society of Fine 

Arts, 2400 Third Avenue 

South, Minneapolis, MN 

55404 



Murphy, Mark E. 

FY 1983 

$5,000 

31-4212-00005 

Contact: 262 Ohio, Apt. 8, 

Pasadena, CA 91 106 



Museum of Modern Art 

FY 1987 

$10,000 

87-4251-0005 

Contact: Director, Museum 

of Modern Art, 1 1 West 

53rd Street, New York, NY 

10019 



McGarvey, John H. 

FY 1980 

$10,000 

01-4213-175 

Contact: 73 1 Cornell 

Avenue, Drexel Hill, PA 

19026 



New Alchemy Institute 

FY 1981 

$30,000 

12-4252-212 

Contact: Executive Director, 

The New Alchemy 

Institute, 237 Hatchville 

Road, East Falmouth, MA 

02536 



Rhode Island School of 
Design 
FY 1983 
$10,000 
32-4250-00119 
Contact: Director, Rhode 
Island School of Design, 2 
College Street, Providence, 
RI 02903 



To conduct research for a historical 
study on industrial design in four mid- 
western manufacturing communities. A 
regional case study of industrial design in 
Fort Wayne, Indiana, was developed. 



For an exhibit entitled The Hardware 
Store. The aim was to reveal the utilitar- 
ian beauty and design excellence of the 
items traditionally found in hardware 
stores. These tools are models of single- 
purpose designs, where function as a de- 
terminant of form has resulted in both el- 
egance and economy. 



For the design of a small motorized vehi- 
cle. The design was meant to be simple 
and inexpensive to manufacture and 
maintain while meeting basic transporta- 
tion needs under average commuting 
conditions. 



For an exhibition of the product and fur- 
niture designs of Mario Bellini, an influ- 
ential Italian designer. Bellini, now in 
mid-career, established himself at the 
outset of the electronic revolution as a 
principal form-giver to products of con- 
temporary technology. 



For a book and multimedia presentation 
on state-of-the-art drawing techniques for 
practitioners and students of industrial 
design. 



To develop solar greenhouses (arks or 
bioshelters) that fuse practical agricul- 
tural concepts with imaginative solar ar- 
chitecture. Solutions were explored using 
computer simulations, a survey of light- 
weight solar glazings for membranous 
structures and small-scale prototype fab- 
rication. 



For an exhibition on bentwood and lami- 
nation techniques for designing and man- 
ufacturing furniture. The exhibition dis- 
played historic examples of Fames and 
Aalto pieces along with works by fifteen 
contemporary craftspeople. A catalogue 
accompanied the exhibit. 



Philadelphia Museum of 

Art 

FY 1982 

$30,000 

22-4250-152 

Contact: Curator and Head 

of Publications, Philadelphia 

Museum of Art, Box 7646, 

Philadelphia, PA 19101 



Polyzoides, Stefanos 

FY 1984 

$10,000 

41-4213-0145 

Contact: 2525 Monterey 

Road, San Marino, CA 

91108 



Pulos, Arthur 

FY 1984 

$15,000 

41-4213-0119 

Contact: 1939 East 

Gennesee Street, Syracuse, 

NY 13210 



Queens County Arts and 

Cultural Center 

FY 1983 

$20,000 

32-4250-00044 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Queens County Arts and 

Cultural Center, New York 

City Building, Flushing 

Meadow-Corona Park, 

Flushing, NY 11368 



For an extensive catalogue documenting 
a product design exhibition held by the 
museum. The catalogue, entitled Design 
Since 1945, was published in 1983. It fo- 
cuses on the development of the indus- 
trial design profession and on solutions to 
design problems for the mass-production 
market in the postwar era. 



To catalogue and build reproductions of 
architect Rudolph M. Schindler's furni- 
ture designs. These designs begin with a 
traditional European approach and un- 
dergo an evolution as the result of his 
contact with the American arts and 
crafts movement. 



To perform research for a history of in- 
dustrial design in the United States. The 
aim was to explore the impact of design 
on the humane and aesthetic aspects of 
American life as well as on the national 
economy, in an age of international chal- 
lenge. 



For an exhibit entitled Streamline De- 
sign: How the Future Was. The exhibit 
examined the formal and functional 
properties of the streamline style that 
was popular in the 1930s and 1940s 
through an exploration of the works of 
Norman Bel Geddes, Raymond Loewy, 
Walter Dorwin Teague and Henry Drey- 
fuss. 









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A year of field research and evaluation went into the design of 
the disaster vehicle of the American Red Cross. The vehicle has 
been designed with ease of operation and maintenance in mind. 



1 54 CHAPTER FOUR 



Samuels. Allen 

FY 1982 

$5,000 

21-4213-107 

Contact: Associate 

Professor, School of Art, 

University of Michigan, 

2518 Georgetown 

Boulevard, Ann Arbor, MI 

48105 



Smith, Constance A. 

FY 1986 

$5,000 

86^213-0043 

Contact: 447 Madison 

Avenue, West Hempstead, 

NY 11552 



Spilman, Raymond 
FY 1977 
$10,000 
R71-42-57N 
Contact: Althea Lane, 
Darien, CT 06820 



Tuttle, Paul 

FY 1982 

$15,000 

2M215-166 

Conlaci: Furniture 

Designer, 855 Toro Canyon 

Road, Santa Barbara, CA 

93108 



University of Idaho 
FY 1978 
$6,310 
R80-42-I8 
Contact: Director, 
Cartography Laboratory, 
University of Idaho, 
Moscow, ID 83843 



University of Michigan 
FY 1983 
$200,000 
DCA 83-10 
Contact: Director, 
Architecture and Planning 
Research Laboratory, 200 
Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann 
Arbor, MI 48109 



To prepare a text in industrial design 
education for use by students and faculty 
alike. A manuscript was produced that 
covers design history, problem-solving 
methodology, techniques for visualizing, 
conceptualizing and developing designs, 
and issues related to business practice, 
ethics and professionalism. 



To redesign elements of the automobile 
to permit comfortable and safe operation 
by those suffering from arthritis. A re- 
port. Moving Ahead: The Arthritic Mo- 
torist in an Adaptive Environment, was 
produced. 



To research the formative years of indus- 
trial design in the United States (1850- 
1953) by investigating published and ar- 
chival materials and interviewing princi- 
pal and supporting members of the de- 
sign community. 



To research furniture as environmental 
sculpture, in terms of spatial relation- 
ships, texture, color and tactile qualities. 
Traditional and newer materials were 
tested, and basic design forms and sym- 
bols, such as the Z, O and X shapes, 
were studied. 



To study the visual communication effi- 
cacy of various maps and graphics meant 
for the general public. In a report, alter- 
native designs were evaluated and tested. 



For The Competitive Edge, a leadership 
program aimed at educating corporate 
clients about design. The aim was to de- 
velop ways to effectively integrate design 
and designers within the corporate man- 
agement structure. Educational materials 
and seminars were produced for senior 
executives and for professional schools of 
business. 



Walker, Charles Dorian 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

91-4232-168 

Contact: 2000 P Street, 

N.W, Washington, DC 

20036 



Walker Art Center 

FY 1987 

$10,500 

NEA DCA 87-19 

Contact: Walker Art 

Center, Vineland Place, 

Minneapolis, MN 55403 



Wurman, Richard Saul 

FY 1981 

$12,400 

11-4213-180 

Contact: 612 South 

Lafayette Park Place, Apt. 

32, Los Angeles, CA 90057 



Zeisel, Eva 

FY 1983 

$15,000 

31-4215-00023 

Contact: Designer, 455 

South Mountain Road, New 

City, Rockland County, NY 

10956 



To produce a documentary film on indus- 
trial designer Raymond Loewy. 



For research on emerging issues in indus- 
trial design in connection with the De- 
sign Arts Program. 



To develop an audiovisual presentation 
for the exhibition, A Paperclip and 299 
Other Things. 



To design and research architectural dec- 
orative elements and to execute original 
designs for dinnerware, china and other 
consumer goods in preparation for an ex- 
hibition. 



Graphic Design 

Projects and research to improve the effectiveness of signs, 
directional systems and printed matter, with special empha- 
sis on public information materials of the federal govern- 
ment and nonprofit organizations. 



American Institute of 

Graphic Arts 

FY 1977 

$20,000 

R70-42-178N 

Contact: American Institute 

of Graphic Arts, 1059 Third 

Avenue, New York, NY 

10002 



To develop a manual of graphic guide- 
lines for nonprofit organizations. The aim 
was to help organizations coordinate all 
printed materials, signs and exhibition in- 
stallations. 



DESIGN FOR INDIVIDUALS 155 



American Institute of 

Graphic Arts 

FY 1977 

$14,000 

PC 77-27 

Contact: American Institute 

of Graphic Arts, 1059 Third 

Avenue, New York, NY 

10021 



American Institute of 

Graphic Arts 

FY 1980 

$8,600 

CA 80-41 

Contact: Executive Director, 

American Institute of 

Graphic Arts, 1059 Third 

Avenue, New York, NY 

I002I 



American Institute of 

Graphic Arts 

FY 1980 

$6,139 

02-4222-057 

Contact: Executive Director, 

American Institute of 

Graphic Arts, 1059 Third 

Avenue, New York, NY 

10021 



American Institute of 

Graphic Arts 

FY 1982 

$6,831 

22-4250-124 

Contact: Assistant Director, 

American Institute of 

Graphic Arts, 1059 Third 

Avenue, New York, NY 

10021 



American Institute of 

Graphic Arts 

FY 1984 

$10,000 

42-4256-0039 

Contact: Director, American 

Institute of Graphic Arts, 

1059 Third Avenue, New 

York, NY 10021 



American Institute of 

Graphic Arts 

FY 1986 

$31,900 

86-4256-0080 

Contact: Director, American 

Institute of Graphic Arts, 

1059 Third Avenue, New 

York, NY 10021 



To research, document and prepare a re- 
port for government administrators on 
how existing graphics standardization 
systems can save money and contribute 
to effective management. 



To publish a handbook to provide basic 
instruction in graphic design to nonprofit 
organizations. 



To organize, publish and disseminate 
The AIGA Education Directory, a listing 
of academic institutions in the United 
States that offer courses in graphic de- 
sign. 



To develop a guide to source materials in 
the history of graphic design: films, vid- 
eotapes, correspondence, magazine arti- 
cles and photos from personal and insti- 
tutional archives. 



For seed grants to six local chapters of 
the American Institute of Graphic Arts 
for projects to educate the public about 
graphic design. The projects covered a 
range of issues and were featured in the 
institute's journal. 



To expand the AIGA Journal of Graphic 
Design, the official publication of the 
American Institute of Graphic Arts. 



American Institute of 

Graphic Arts 

FY 1987 

$15,000 

87-4251-0159 

Contact: Associate Director, 

American Institute of 

Graphic Arts, 1059 Third 

Avenue, New York, NY 

I002I 



Architectural Arts of 

Washington, D.C. 

FY 1982 

$15,000 

22-4250-120 

Contact: Executive Editor, 

Architectural Arts of 

Washington, D.C, 410! W 

Street, N.W., Suite 301, 

Washington, DC 20007 



Bigus, Richard L. 

FY 1983 

$10,000 

31-4213-00140 

Contact: 703 Iowa Street, 

Cedar Falls, I A 50613 



Capitol Children's Museum 

FY 1983 

$5,000 

32-4252-00125 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Capitol Children's Museum, 

800 Third Street, N.E., 

Washington, DC 20002 



Catholic University of 

America 

FY 1980 

$40,000 

CA 80-11 

Contact: Provost, The 

Catholic University of 

America. Department of 

Architecture and Planning, 

620 Michigan Avenue, 

N.E., Washington, DC 

20064 



Catholic University of 

America 

FY 1981 

$50,000 

CA 81-30 

Contact: Controller, The 

Catholic University of 

America, Department of 

Architecture and Planning, 

620 Michigan Avenue, 

N.E., Washington, DC 

20064 



For grants to local chapters for traveling 
exhibitions, seminars, publications and 
other programs. 



To publish Design Matters, a newsletter 
on architecture, urban planning and inte- 
rior and graphic design patterned after 
the successful Federal Design Matters 
published by the Endowment. 



To explore typography as an example of 
two-dimensional composition — an art 
form that relies on the shape and ar- 
rangement of symbolic signs to support 
human communication. 



To improve the graphic presentation of 
information displayed on computer ter- 
minals. The aim is to develop user-ori- 
ented criteria for screen design. 



To edit four issues of Design Matters 
and several publications on design com- 
petitions. 



For research, writing and editorial ser- 
vices for Federal Design Matters and 
other Design Arts Program publications. 



156 CHAPTER FOUR 



Catholic University of 

America 

FY 1982 

$50,000 

DCA 82-11 

Contact: Director. Office 

Sponsored Programs, The 

Catholic University of 

America, 213 McMahon, 

Box 657, Cardinal Station, 

Washington, DC 20074 



Center for Communication 

FY 1985 

$20,000 

52-4256-0007 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Center for Communication, 

1 133 Avenue of the 

Americas, New York, NY 

10036 



Chaparos, Nicholas 

FY 1978 

$37,333 

PC 78-41 

Contact: 1 1 12 Sixth Street,^ 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20001 



Clark, Donald M. 

FY 1982 

$50,000 

21-4213-168 

Contact: Graphic Designer, 

3327 Beverly Boulevard, 

Los Angeles, CA 90004 



Colorado Council on the 

Arts and Humanities 

FY 1978 

$17,130 

R80-42-56 

Contact: Artist Services 

Coordinator, Colorado 

Council on the Arts and 

Humanities, 770 

Pennsylvania Street, 

Denver, CO 80203 



Contemporary Arts Center 

FY 1986 

$15,000 

86-4257-0017 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Contemporary Arts Center, 

900 Camp Street, New 

Orleans, LA 70130 



For editing and publication assistance for 
six issues of Federal Design Matters and 
for technical-assistance publications on 
design competitions, design standards 
and regulations. 



For a conference, "Communicating 
Through Design." Four workshops fo- 
cused on advances in the field and on the 
use of design as a communications me- 
dium. Students and faculty from twenty- 
one universities attended. 



For administrative support for the Fed- 
eral Design Improvement Program, a 
project to improve visual communication 
throughout the federal government. 



To research directional and informational 
graphic systems in commercial airports. 
Special focus was given to smaller 
municipalities which would not otherwise 
have been able to retain professional de- 
sign expertise. 



To hire a graphic designer to develop 
and implement a comprehensive graphics 
improvement program for the state of 
Colorado, as recommended by the 1976 
Colorado Design Assembly. 



For a national design competition enti- 
tled the Fine Art of Making Money. The 
competition focused on currency design 
as a form of visual art, taking a hypo- 
thetical redesign of the American dollar 
bill as its topic. 



Design Management 

Institute 

FY 1982 

$26,000 

22-4250-134 

Contact: Director, Design 

Management Institute, 50 

Milk Street, 1 5th Floor, 

Boston, MA 02109 



Dimancescu, Dan P 

FY 1977 

$9,500 

R7I-42-29N 

Contact: 23 Monument 

Square, Charleston, MA 

02129 



Environmental Images, Inc. 

FY 1984 

$50,000 

NEA DCA 84-75 

Contact: Vice-President, 

Environmental Images, Inc., 

1346 Connecticut Avenue, 

N.W, Washington, DC 

20036 



Field Museum of Natural 

History 

FY 1982 

$10,000 

22-4230-198 

Contact: Director, Field 

Museum of Natural 

History, Roosevelt Road at 

Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, 

IL 60605 



Franklin Furnace Archive 

FY 1986 

$35,000 

86-4256-0029 

Contact: President, Franklin 

Furnace Archive, 1 1 2 

Franklin Street, New York, 

NY 10013 



Franklin Furnace Archive 

FY 1987 

$22,500 

87-4251-0035 

Contact: Director, Franklin 

Furnace Archive, 112 

Franklin Street, New York, 

NY 10013 



To create design courses for business 
school students and corporate executives. 
Prototype curricula were developed 
whose aim is to instill an appreciation of 
design as a significant resource in accom- 
plishing corporate objectives. 



To research the evolution of design in ur- 
ban cartography from 1 900 to the 
present and to develop recommendations 
on the design of city maps for the gen- 
eral public. 



To assess the results and the level of ef- 
fectiveness of the Federal Graphics Im- 
provement Program, and to develop rec- 
ommendations for graphics standards 
manuals based on the evaluations of peer 
panels. A$ 10,000 amendment, NEA 
DCA 84-75.1, was awarded in 1985. 



To design an interior graphic and sign 
system for the collections and public ar- 
eas of the Field Museum of Natural His- 
tory. The museum's original signs were 
created in 1921, and did not adequately 
address issues of internal circulation. 



To prepare and publish a history of book 
design that examines the forms in which 
information is contained and transmit- 
ted — among them the scroll, codex, fan 
and accordion forms. The aim was to fo- 
cus on how different cultures at different 
times developed certain forms to convey 
information. 



To design a permanent facility within the 
institution for exhibition of works from 
the collection entitled. The Future of the 
Book — the Book of the Future. These 
books are not traditional books; they are 
also artworks, unconventional in form. 



DESIGN FOR INDIVIDUALS 157 



Fraterdeus, Peter S. 

FY 1987 

$10,000 

87-4216-0049 

Contact: 1024 Judson 

Avenue, Evanston, IL 60202 



Marcus, Aaron 

FY 1981 

$9,000 

11-4210-018 

Contact: 1306 Bay view 

Place, Berkeley, CA 94708 



Meggs, Philip B. 

FY 1981 

$5,000 

11-4213-098 

Contact: 1410 Palmyra 

Avenue, Richmond, VA 

23227 



Miho, Tomoko 

FY 1979 

$20,560 

PC 79-19 

Contact: 1 045 Fifth Avenue, 

New York, NY 10028 



Greiman, April 

FY 1987 

$9,800 

87-4216-0132 

Contact: 620 Moulton, No. 

211, Los Angeles, CA 

90031 



Haber, Juergen 

FY 1977 

$16,000 

PC 77-18 

Contact: 1771 T Street, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20009 



Harvey, Clifford A. 
FY 1987 
$5,800 

87-4216-0050 
Contact: 525 Braddock 
Avenue South, Apt. 1, 
Pittsburgh, PA 15221 



To develop a typeface family that fully 
realizes the potential of current com- 
puter technology. As desktop publishing 
technology becomes more widely used, 
there is a need for typefaces designed 
specifically for the digital process. 



For a conference on responsible informa- 
tional graphics. The aim was to focus on 
how diagrams, charts, maps and models 
can be used to make public information 
more comprehensible. 



To gather drawings and photographs for 
a textbook on the history of graphic de- 
sign. 



For the first phase in the development of 
a graphic design system for the National 
Endowment for the Arts. 



For an exploration of the capabilities of 
microcomputer graphics that have been 
made possible through recent electronics 
technology. The goal was to provide con- 
crete examples of the new visual lan- 
guage available to design professionals 
and the general public using available 
electronic tools. 



To research, write and provide editorial 
services for four issues of Federal Design 
Matters. 



To reprint 700 original commercial wood 
engravings from the GramLee Collection 
in West Virginia. The collection was also 
inventoried and the historical signifi- 
cance of the images researched. 



Heller, Steven 

FY 1987 

$10,000 

87-4216-0044 

Contact:! West 16th 

Street, New York, NY 

10011 



Heller, Steven and Fili, 

Louise 

FY 1984 

$10,000 

41-4213-0134 

Contact: 7 West 16th 

Street, New York, NY 

10011 



Helmken, Charles M. 

FY 1986 

$10,000 

86-4213-0042 

Contact: 1280 21st Street, 

N.W., Suite 410, 

Washington, DC 20036 



Hutchinson, James R. 

FY 1985 

$6,500 

51-4213-0140 

Contact: 1 248 San Carlos 

Drive, San Luis Obispo, CA 

93401 



Institute for Continuing 

Studies in Design, 

Management and 

Communication 

FY 1980 

$8,500 

CA 80-39 

Contact: Institute for 

Continuing Studies in 

Design, Management and 

Communication, 1112 Sixth 

Street, N.W, Washington, 

DC 20001 



Institute for Continuing 

Studies in Design, 

Management and 

Communication 

FY 1981 

$20,000 

12-4250-008 

Contact: President, Institute 

for Continuing Studies in 

Design, Management and 

Communication, 1112 Sixth 

Street, N.W, Washington, 

DC 20001 



To research the work of Lucien Bern- 
hard, a graphic designer who influenced 
U.S. and European advertising and 
graphic design. Bernhard designed thirty- 
six typefaces and was a master packag- 
ing and billboard designer. The research 
was intended for use in an article and ex- 
hibition. 



To produce an exhibit on the work, the- 
ory and philosophy of William Addison 
Dwiggins (1880-1956). Dwiggins was a 
pioneer in graphic design; his work in- 
cluded calligraphy, cartography, stencil- 
ing, scenic design and typography. 



To compare and contrast the creative 
processes of Japanese and American 
graphic designers through interviews 
with twelve designers from both coun- 
tries. The study resulted in an outline for 
a course or lecture series, a bibliography, 
an exhibit and a video entitled "The Zen 
of Design." 



To write a manual applying the princi- 
ples of typography and good design to 
word processing. 



To publish the monograph, Managing 
Concepts and Images: A Global View. 



For a seminar for graphic designers em- 
ployed in the public sector. The work- 
shop covered problem-solving and design- 
management techniques, graphic arts 
production and photography. A seminar 
requirement was that designers attend 
with their editor and supervisor. 



158 CHAPTER FOUR 



International Design 

Education Foundation 

FY 1980 

$20,000 

02-4250-121 

Contact: Project Director, 

International Design 

Education Foundation, 5900 

Wilshire Boulevard, Los 

Angeles, CA 90036 



International Design 

Education Foundation 

FY 1984 

$13,500 

42-4255-0048 

Contact: Executive Director, 

International Design 

Education Foundation, PO. 

Box 1 850, Madison Square 

Station, New York, NY 

10159 



Johnson, Baker 

FY 1977 

$15,000 

PC 77-20 

Contact: 1011 Wilson 

Boulevard, Arlington, VA 

22210 



Lees, W. John 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

91-4232-107 

Contact: 24 Demar Road, 

Lexington, MA 02173 



To produce a graphic design competition 
challenging designers to present public 
information in accessible, understandable 
formats, using conventional means as 
well as computer graphics and video. 



Malcolm Grear Designers, 

Inc. 

FY 1981 

$25,000 

PC 81-17 

Contact: President, Malcolm 

Grear Designers, Inc., 391- 

393 Eddy Street, 

Providence, RI 02903 



Marcus, Aaron 

FY 1978 

$3,100 

R81-42-I4N 

Contact: Princeton 

University, School of 

Architecture and Urban 

Planning, N-02 Architecture 

Building, Princeton, NJ 

08540 



To produce "A Tribute to Walter 
Paepcke," an audiovisual presentation 
about the founder of the Container Cor- 
poration of America. The show presents 
examples of Paepcke's efforts to inte- 
grate architecture, graphic design, inte- 
rior design, color theory and fine arts 
into the mainstream of business. 



For design and production of four post- 
ers: for the Federal Design Improvement 
Program, the Federal Graphics Improve- 
ment Program, Design Management and 
the Fourth Federal Design Assembly. 



For a study of visual communications 
and its use by national, regional and local 
governments. The report. The Emperor 
Undressed, explores the uses of design in 
the dissemination of information, as sup- 
port for ideology and as a tool for the 
education of the citizen. 



For graphic design formats for materials 
produced through the Department of En- 
ergy program Solar Cities and Towns. 
The formats and guidelines included a 
logo, cover sheet and publications format 
for use by participating agencies and 
contractors. 



To write an article on mass transit graph- 
ics complementing an exhibition by the 
American Institute of Graphic Arts. 



Marcus, Aaron 

FY 1980 

$9,000 

01-4210-230 

Contact: 1 306 Bay View 

Place, Berkeley, CA 94708 



Meggs, Phillip B. 

FY 1977 

$9,410 

R7I-42-8N 

Contact: 1410 Palmyra 

Avenue, Richmond, VA 

23227 



Meggs, Philip B. 

FY 1979 

$8,000 

91-4232-109 

Contact: 1410 Palmyra 

Avenue, Richmond, VA 

23227 



Meggs, Philip B. 

FY 1986 

$10,000 

86-4213-0116 

Contact: Virginia 

Commonwealth University, 

Box 2519, 325 North 

Harrison Street, Richmond, 

VA 23284 



Mevorah, Emanuel 

FY 1982 

$7,000 

21-4213-179 

Contact: Acting Director of 

Architecture, Washington 

Area Transit Authority, 

13539 Youngwood Turn, 

Bowie, MD 20715 



M.I.T. Press 

FY 1979 

$17,550 

92-4235-120 

Contact: Acquisitions 

Editor, M.I.T. Press, 

Cambridge, MA 02139 



Municipal Art Society 

FY 1979 

$50,000 

92-4235-267 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Municipal Art Society, 457 

Madison Avenue. New 

York, NY 10022 



For a conference on responsible informa- 
tional graphics. The focus was on dia- 
grams, maps and models as visual means 
of making public information compre- 
hensible and usable. 



To develop a program on typography and 
letter forms for use in public school 
grades nine to twelve. The program in- 
cluded a series of classroom projects, 
posters and a multimedia presentation. 



For a history and chronology of twenti- 
eth-century graphic design. The first 
three chapters of a book manuscript 
were produced. 



To study the history and development of 
American graphic design, its relationship 
to other art forms and to the political, so- 
cial and economic history of the United 
States. 



To compile and analyze maps from rapid 
rail transportation systems worldwide. 
Through analysis of the maps and on-site 
observations, the success and failure of 
the different means of presenting in- 
formation to the public were evaluated. 



To study the feasibility of establishing an 
Endowment program that would make 
funding available to publishers in ar- 
chitecture and design as well as in other 
arts fields. Increased costs of materials 
and skilled labor have discouraged pub- 
lishers from producing heavily illustrated 
books. A report. Book Publishing and 
the Design Arts: The Case for NEA 
Support, was produced. 



To develop new communication formats 
to encourage public awareness of urban 
design and land-use issues. 



DESIGN FOR INDIVIDUALS 1 59 



National Trust for Historic 

Preservation 

FY 1979 

$16,605 

92-4212-049 

Contact: National Trust for 

Historic Preservation, 1785 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20036 



New York City Planning 

Department Fund 

FY 1982 

$26,500 

22-4250-145 

Contact: Executive Director, 

New York City Planning 

Department Fund, 2 

Lafayette Street, Room 

1500, New York, NY 10007 



New York Landmarks 
Preservation Foundation 
FY 1983 
$15,000 
32-4230-00072 
Contact: Chairman, New 
York Landmarks 
Preservation Foundation, 20 
Vessey Street, New York, 
NY 10007 



North Dakota Arts Council 

FY 1977 

$10,250 

R70^2-51 

Contact: Acting 

Administrator, North 

Dakota Council on the Arts 

and Humanities, 320 

Minard Hall, Fargo, ND 

58102 



Office of Arkansas State 
Arts and Humanities 
FY 1977 
$10,200 
R70-42-157 
Contact: Design 
Coordinator, Office of 
Arkansas State Arts and 
Humanities, Markham and 
Main Streets, Suite 500, 
Little Rock, AR 72201 



To produce an audiovisual presentation 
entitled "Signs for Main Street: Mes- 
sages and Images." The aim was to con- 
vey the benefits of good graphic design 
to older commercial areas throughout the 
Midwest. The package provided tech- 
nical assistance to communities that were 
unable to actively participate in the 
Main Street revitalization project. 



To develop means of integrating the art 
of graphic design with computer graph- 
ics technology. A program of seminars 
for designers was held and a computer 
graphic design manual, Improving Com- 
puter Graphics, was produced. 



To hire a graphic designer to develop a 
clear, effective graphics system that co- 
ordinates all printed materials, audiovi- 
sual information and publications of the 
New York Landmarks Preservation 
Commission. 



To support the services of the Prairie 
Community Design Center for arts 
groups in North Dakota: to develop co- 
ordinated graphic design and design and 
produce posters, brochures, press releases 
and other materials. 



To support the costs of a staff designer 
for the state graphics improvement pro- 
gram. A three-day conference, "Design 
Arkansas Assembly," was held, and a 
package of educational materials was 
produced to explain the services of the 
Design Arkansas program. 



Otis Art Institute of Parsons 

School of Design 

FY 1983 

$15,000 

32-4250-00194 

Contact: Dean, Otis Art 

Institute of Parsons School 

of Design, 2401 Wilshire 

Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 

90057 



Paauwe, Paul D. 

FY 1986 

$10,000 

86-4213-0048 

Contact: 546 Cooper 

Avenue, Kalamazoo, Ml 

49001 



Partners for Livable Places 

FY 1982 

$30,000 

22-4250-151 

Contact: Associate Director, 

Economics of Amenity 

Program, Partners for 

Livable Places, 1429 21st 

Street, N.W., Washington, 

DC 20036 



Society of Environmental 

Graphic Designers (SEGD) 

Education Foundation 

FY 1987 

$20,435 

87-4251-0072 

Contact: Executive Director, 

SEGD Education 

Foundation, 47 Third 

Street, Cambridge, MA 

02141 



South Platte River 

Greenway Foundation 

FY 1978 

$22,900 

R80-42-94 

Contact: Project Director, 

South Platte River 

Greenway Foundation, 1421 

Court Plaza, Denver, CO 

80202 



Speare, Sarah 

FY 1983 

$4,129 

31-4212-60050 

Contact: 3048 N Street, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20007 



To produce Moving Introductions, an ex- 
hibit on motion-picture graphics. The ex- 
hibit featured the design of title se- 
quences in motion pictures and 
television, including current and histori- 
cal still images and pre-1950 title de- 
signs. A symposium with leading design- 
ers was also held, and the exhibit was 
documented on videocassette. 



To design a new serif typeface, intended 
particularly for use in newspapers and in- 
cluding light, medium, bold, roman and 
italic alphabets. 



To publish The Public Sector Designs, 
an illustrated book with resource refer- 
ences and bibliography about the ten- 
year-old Federal Design Improvement 
Program. 



To design additional symbols for the na- 
tional system of recreation signs cur- 
rently in use, and to publish guidelines to 
ensure use by federal agencies, local gov- 
ernment, private recreation organizations 
and the general public. 



To design a graphics and interpretive in- 
formation system for Denver's Platte 
River Greenway. A system of signs was 
developed to direct users to facilities, as 
well as to provide information on the riv- 
er's history and ecology. 



For a research project for the Design 
Arts Program on the Federal Graphics 
Improvement Project. 



160 CHAPTER FOUR 



Speare. Sarah 

FY 1984 

$30,500 

41-4251-0095 

Conlact: 3048 N Street, 

N.W., Washington. DC 

20007 



Styles. Deborah M. 

FY 1977 

$30,000 

PC 77-19 

Con/ac»; 92 1 Neal Drive. 

Alexandria, VA 22308 



Sutton. David 

FY 1983 

$8,550 

31-4213-00177 

Contact: Director, Explorers 

Hall. National Geographic 

Society, 1 300 Army-Navy 

Drive, Arlington, VA 22202 



Symphony Space 
FY 1982 
$1,500 
22-4230-035 
Contact: Director of 
Development, Symphony 
Space, 2537 Broadway, 
New York, NY 10025 



Theater Communications 

Group, Inc. 

FY 1980 

$15,000 

02-4250-140 

Contact: Publications 

Director, Theater 

Communications Group, 

Inc., 355 Lexington Avenue, 

New York, NY 10017 



Thiel, Elizabeth A. 
FY 1980 
$4,000 
01-4214-020 
Contact: Route 2, Box 
181C, Byans Road, 
Fenwick.MD 20616 



Trustees of the Swain 

School 

FY 1980 

$5,150 

02-4250-139 

Conlact: Assistant Professor. 

Swain School. Design 

Department, 19 Hawthorne 

Street. New Bedford, MA 

02740 



To coordinate and manage the Federal 
Graphics Improvement Program and pro- 
vide a liaison between the Arts Endow- 
ment and twenty federal agencies. 



To research, edit, design and illustrate 
three design monographs: Graphics Stan- 
dards Manuals by Bruce Blackburn, 
Grids by Massimo Vignelli and Photo- 
graphs by Norman Sanders. 



To analyze the federal government's 
graphic design and printing activities in 
connection with the Federal Graphics 
Improvement Program. Existing docu- 
ments were analyzed and ideas for reduc- 
ing paper and printing costs while main- 
taining design and legibility standards 
were outlined. 



To design a logo and a broad range of 
graphics for Symphony Space: letter- 
head, calendars of events, posters, ad- 
vertisements and interior and exterior 
signs. 



To publish a book instructing arts admin- 
istrators and others whose work involves 
printed communications for the arts on 
the impact and application of graphic de- 
sign. 



To produce six posters using varied tech- 
niques and subject matter, unconven- 
tional materials and concepts. The im- 
ages and creative processes used were 
explained in a report. 



To produce a lecture series and to begin 
work on a publication about the theoreti- 
cal, practical and innovative aspects of 
graphic design. 



University of Arkansas 

FY 1982 

$2,500 

22-4250-042 

Contact: Assistant Professor 

of Art, University of 

Arkansas, Board of 

Trustees, Fayetteville, AR 

72701 



University of the District of 

Columbia 

FY 1977 

$17,500 

R70-42-191 

Contact: Project Director, 

University of the District of 

Columbia, Mt. Vernon 

Square Campus, 

Washington, DC 20008 



University of Michigan 
FY 1984 
$100,000 
NEA DCA 84-56 
Contact: Professor, 
University of Michigan, 245 
West Engineering, Ann 
Arbor, Ml 48109 



University of Wisconsin 
FY 1985 
$25,190 
52-4252-0072 
Contact: Assistant to the 
Dean, University of 
Wisconsin, Graduate 
School, PO. Box 413, 
Milwaukee, WI 53201 



Walker Art Center 
FY 1983 
$7,000 

32-4250-00122 
Contact: Design Curator, 
Walker Art Center, 
Vineland Plaza, 
Minneapolis, MN 55403 



To establish an annual ten-week graphic 
design workshop. The aim was to provide 
students with an opportunity to design 
and correlate all aspects of art for re- 
production. 



For a coordinated graphic design system 
for the University of the District of Co- 
lumbia: its letterhead, brochures, campus 
locaters and signs. 



For phase two of the Competitive Edge 
project. This phase consisted of a de- 
tailed work plan; analysis of target audi- 
ences; development of communication 
and media strategies; and production, 
dissemination and evaluation of commu- 
nication and media products. 



To research ways to design information 
systems to help people find their way in 
large building complexes. A report on in- 
formation system design was produced. 



For an exhibition and catalogue on the 
art of poster design as realized by 
graphic designers of our era. The cata- 
logue, published in 1984 and written by 
Dawn Ades, is entitled Posters: The 
Twenthieth-Century Design of the 
Avant-Garde. 



DESIGN FOR INDIVIDUALS 161 



Fashion Design 

Studies and projects in fashion design, and clothing and 
fabric design and construction. 



Albin, Peggy Bass 

FY 1979 

$7,400 

91-4231-091 

Conlact: 1 2205 Midland 

Walk. Austin, TX 78759 



Barr, Laura 

FY 1987 

$10,000 

87-4216-0054 

Contaci: 5122 West Gladys 

Avenue, Chicago, IL 60644 



California State University 

Foundation 

FY 1982 

$10,000 

22-4250-044 

Contact: Associate Professor 

of Art, California State 

University, 18111 Nordhoff 

Street, Northridge, CA 

91330 



Cathedral Works 
Corporation 
FY 1985 
$50,000 
52-4213-0137 
Contact: The Cathedral 
Works Corporation, 1047 
American Avenue, New 
York, NY 10025 



Cooper, Lyle J. 

FY 1982 

$4,800 

21-4212-162 

Contact: 300 East Garcia, 

Santa Fe, NM 87501 



Cultural Council 

Foundation 

FY 1983 

$7,500 

324250-00102 

Contact: Director, Program 

Services, Cultural Council 

Foundation, 625 Broadway, 

New York, NY 10012 



To document the designs and techniques 
employed in the creation and embelHsh- 
ment of handmade textiles produced by 
workers with Mexican backgrounds in 
Texas at the turn of the century. 



To conduct fashion workshops and semi- 
nars in minority low-income communi- 
ties. The aims were to educate partici- 
pants about the relationship between 
clothing design and self-image, and to 
have participants create and design their 
own wardrobes. Seminars were con- 
ducted in schools, churches, community 
centers and senior citizens' centers. 



For an internship research project in tex- 
tile design. This project established a 
communications network with area stu- 
dios and textile manufacturers, created a 
pilot internship system within the local 
industry and included an exhibit of stu- 
dent work in the community. 



To provide fellowships to five apprentices 
working in the design and manufacture 
of textiles. The Cathedral Works design 
apprenticeship program draws appren- 
tices mainly from local low-income 
neighborhoods, and most later find jobs 
in industry. 



To research design techniques possible 
with sixteen-harness dobby weaving. The 
study produced information regarding 
new fabric and clothing design concepts 
in experimental, nontraditional weaving 
methods. 



To produce a series of videotaped inter- 
views with major figures in fashion de- 
sign history, including Adolpho, Bill 
Blass, Mary McFadden, Pauline Trigere 
and Oscar de la Renta. 



DaConciecao, Maria 

FY 1981 

$8,000 

11-4215-119 

Contaci: 1 727 S Street, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20009 



Drexel University 

FY 1979 

$15,000 

92-4212-039 

Contact: Drexel University, 

32nd and Chestnut Streets, 

Philadelphia, PA 19104 



Drexel University 

FY 1980 

$17,500 

02-4250-114 

Contact: Vice-President for 

Academic Affairs, Drexel 

University, 32nd and 

Chestnut Streets, 

Philadelphia, PA 19104 



Drexel University 

FY 1981 

$38,000 

12-4230-182 

Contact: Professor of 

Design, Drexel University, 

Nesbitt College, 32nd and 

Chestnut Streets, 

Philadelphia. PA 19104 



To design clothing that is timeless in look 
and flexible in use. Several pieces were 
designed that could be worn together as 
a complete outfit, serving day and eve- 
ning purposes, or separately as simpler, 
more practical clothing. 



For research and design of clothing for 
the elderly and the physically handi- 
capped. 



To design functional and fashionable 
clothing for persons with physical limita- 
tions. One aim of the program was to en- 
courage designers and manufacturers to 
include fashionable clothing designed for 
the handicapped in their collections and 
to make them available through retail 
outlets. 



For a design competition, entitled Design 
without Limits, for the development of 
attractive clothing for the physically 
handicapped. An amendment, grant 
number 12-4230-918.1, for $7,500 was 
made in FY 1982. 




"Designing with Patterns Based on Squares" is the name of a 
book in which Gabriele Knechl describes her innovative approach 
to fashion design. Above: a garment based on squares. © 



162 CHAPTER FOUR 



Fabric Workshop 

FY 1982 

$10,000 

22-4230-219 

Contact: Director. The 

Fabric Workshop. 1133 

Arch Street. Philadelphia. 

PA 19107 



FIDM Museum and Library 

FY 1985 

$5,000 

52-4256-0008 

Contact: Director. FIDM 

Museum and Library. 818 

West Seventh Street. Los 

Angeles, C A 90017 



Friend, Myung Jin 

FY 1987 

$10,000 

87-4216^133 

Contact: Schoonmaker 

Point. Sausalilo. CA 94965 



Harlem Institute of Fashion 

FY 1978 

$20,000 

R8042-116 

Contact: Director, Harlem 

Institute of Fashion, 157 

West 1 26th Street, New 

York, NY 10027 



Harlem Institute of Fashion 

FY 1980 

$30,000 

02-4230-071 

Contact: Director, Harlem 

Institute of Fashion, 157 

West 1 26th Street, New 

York, NY 10027 



Hollomon, Nancy S. 

FY 1979 

$3,972 

91-4231-171 

Contact: 41 16 Roundtree 

Road. Richmond. VA 23229 



Hoover, Deborah 

FY 1978 

$5,225 

PC 78-43 

Contact: 30 Upland Road, 

Apt. 8, Cambridge. MA 

02140 



To inaugurate an architect/designer-in- 
residence program. The emphasis of the 
architects' involvement was on the use of 
fabrics in public contexts. The aims were 
to offer architects and designers a new 
challenge and to elevate the quality of 
fabric design in the United States. 



For the first edition of the Fashion In- 
dex, a reference tool indexing and cross- 
referencing seven English-language fash- 
ion and apparel trade and consumer 
newspapers and magazines. 



To research the ancient craft of ikat 
weaving and dyeing. The craft involves a 
process of dyeing segments of yarn to 
form a pattern prior to cloth construc- 
tion. 



To support a proposed fashion museum 
at the Harlem Institute of Fashion. The 
mission of the museum is to acquire and 
showcase the work of black Americans in 
the creative fields of fashion, and to 
sponsor seminars and workshops for fash- 
ion artists. 



For planning and design for the renova- 
tion of two brownstones to house the 
Fashion Museum at the Harlem Institute 
of Fashion. 



For research on garment construction for 
handicapped persons with specific dis- 
abilities. Commercial clothing patterns 
for handicapped people resulted from the 
project. 



For a study of the current status and 
needs of the fashion design profession in 
the United States. 



Innovative Design Fund 
FY 1983 
$30,000 
32-4212-00138 
Contact: President. 
Innovative Design Fund. 
866 United Nations Plaza. 
New York, NY 10017 



Knecht. Gabriele 
FY 1986 
$10,000 
86-4213-0047 
Contact: 264 West 35th 
Street, Room 805, New 
York. NY 10001 



Konkel, Joan B. 

FY 1984 

$5,000 

41-4213-0124 

Contact: 1627 34th Street. 

N.W. Washington, DC 

20007 



Moja, Januwa 

FY 1985 

$5,000 

51-4213-0063 

Contact: 1464 Belmont 

Street, N.W, Washington, 

DC 20009 



Ohio State University 

Research Foundation 

FY 1985 

$30,000 

52-4231-0029 

Contact: Deputy Director 

for Development, Ohio 

State University Research 

Foundation, 1314 Kinnear 

Road, Columbus, OH 43212 



Otis Art Institute of Parsons 

School of Design 

FY 1982 

$16,000 

22-4250-150 

Contact: Vice-President, 

Business and Finance, 

Parsons School of Design, 

66 West 1 2th Street, New 

York, NY 10011 



To document the fabrication of five pro- 
totypes made by recipients of Innovative 
Design Fund/NEA Fellowships. The 
goal of the Innovative Design Fund is to 
improve the design quality of clothing, 
interior furnishings and textiles. 



To complete a draft book manuscript en- 
titled Designing with Patterns Based on 
Squares. The work documents an origi- 
nal approach to pattern design that uses 
the square as its basic unit. The ap- 
proach is suitable for use by students of 
design and for designing with the com- 
puter. 



To produce prototype garments that inte- 
grate metal with fabric. A report 
documented solutions to problems of 
working in this medium, and many of the 
garments were displayed in a benefit 
fashion show held at the Renwick Gal- 
lery in November 1984. 



To conduct a series of exhibitions, work- 
shops and lectures entitled Dreams, Mys- 
teries and Visions. The goal was to con- 
vey the historical symbolism and 
influence of ethnic costumes, especially 
African ones, on modern-day wearable 
art. The exhibition included fifty-seven 
original garments. 



To develop adaptation techniques and 
garment designs for attractive clothing 
for women who have had mastectomies. 
The results of the study were 
documented in a report. 



To produce a clothing design exhibition 
featuring Rene Bouche. The exhibition 
was part of a series on twenty prominent 
American designers of the 1950s. The 
exhibition was documented in a slide 
show for future use by students. 



DESIGN FOR INDIVIDUALS 163 



Parks, Louise A. 

FY 1982 

$8,000 

21-4213-102 

Contact: Research 

Assistant, City University of 

New York Graduate School, 

1 50 Claremont Avenue, 

Apt. IB, New York, NY 

10027 



Phoenix Art Museum/ 

Arizona Costume Institute 

FY 1983 

$23,158 

32-425000051 

Contact: Assistant Director, 

Phoenix Art Museum, 1625 

North Central Avenue, 

Phoenix, AZ 85004 



Phoenix Art Museum 

FY 1986 

$37,000 

86^256-0183 

Contact: Treasurer, Phoenix 

Art Museum, 1625 North 

Central Avenue, Phoenix, 

AZ 85004 



To study the influence of traditional 
West African decorative arts on fashion 
design in the United States from 1955 to 
1981. 



Rhode Island School of 

Design 

FY 1984 

$11,500 

42-4256-0057 

Contact: Rhode Island 

School of Design, 2 College 

Street, Providence, RI 

02903 



Rudofsky, Bernard 

FY 1983 

$15,000 

31-4215-00166 

Contact: 20! East 69th 

Street, New York, NY 

10021 



Rudofsky, Bernard 

FY 1986 

$10,000 

86^213-0040 

Contact: 201 East 69 Street, 

New York, NY 10021 



Santry, Karen F. 

FY 1987 

$5,000 

87-4216-0053 

Contact: 56 Thomas Street, 

New York, NY 10013 



To produce an exhibit on the work of 
eminent Japanese designers of textiles 
and kimonos. The exhibit, entitled A 
New Wave in Fashion: Three Japanese 
Designers, focused on the influence of 
contemporary Japanese design on Euro- 
pean and American design. 



For Innovative Designers: The Originals, 
an exhibition of the work of fashion de- 
signers who have significantly affected 
the field. The exhibition included the 
works of eighteen designers, beginning 
with Charles Frederick Worth (1826- 
1895), the Englishman who became the 
first "Grand Couturier." A catalogue 
and lecture series accompanied the ex- 
hibit. 



For an exhibition and catalogue on tex- 
tile design. The show, entitled Textiles 
for the Eighties, focused on interior fab- 
rics, addressed design issues arising from 
the use of new materials and manufac- 
turing techniques and examined the 
American textile market. A symposium 
was held, and the exhibit traveled to cit- 
ies in the United States and Canada. 



To investigate the feasibility of manufac- 
turing anatomically correct footwear for 
everyday use, and to produce actual pro- 
totypes with a novel construction and 
look. 



To prepare a book as a follow-up to a 
study on the feasibility of manufacturing 
anatomically correct footwear. The de- 
signs depart from the current concept of 
footwear design. 



To study the use of unusual materials in 
the creation of aesthetically appealing as 
well as functional clothing accessories. 



Watkins, Susan M. 
FY 1985 
$5,000 
51-4213-0067 
Contact: Design and 
Environmental Analysis, 
325 Van Rensselaer Hall, 
Cornell University, Ithaca, 
NY 14853 



Wittner, Ezra 

FY 1980 

$4,000 

01-4210-044 

Contact: 682 Park Drive, 

N.E., Atlanta, GA 30306 



To explore the implications of new tech- 
nologies and materials for apparel design, 
since nontraditional materials often do 
not lend themselves to traditional fab- 
rication methods. A video was produced 
to introduce designers to these new meth- 
ods and to instruct them in suitable de- 
sign processes. 



To design and develop a prototypical mo- 
torcycle safety suit that is functional and 
fashionable. 



Barrier-Free Design 

Design of products and facilities for handicapped and el- 
derly persons and others with special needs. 



Association of Student 
Chapters of the American 
Institute of Architects 
(AIA) 
FY 1985 
$35,000 
52-4257-0081 
Contact: President, 
Association of Student 
Chapters of the AIA, 1735 
New York Avenue, N.W., 
Washington, DC 20006 



Day, Fred L. 

FY 1977 

$7,000 

R71-42-16N 

Contact: Route 2, Box 78, 

Ladson, SC 29456 



Drury, Felix R. R. 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R7 1-42-5 IN 

Contact: 1 30 Cold Spring 

Street, New Haven, CT 

06511 



For a national student design compe- 
tition. Design for Aging. The aims were 
to develop a wide range of design solu- 
tions to meet the needs of the elderly and 
to educate students and faculty in this 
area. 



To design an "insert travel chair" which 
would provide travel assistance for handi- 
capped persons. 



For research and design of improvements 
to early learning environments — spaces 
and equipment — with an emphasis on 
meeting the needs of children with learn- 
ing disabilities. 



164 CHAPTER FOUR 



Farag. Aziz B. 
FY 1977 
$4,710 
R7M2-17N 
Conlaci: 3050-54 
Kirklevington Drive. 
Lexington. KY 40502 



Georgia Institute of 

Technology 

FY 1982 

$29,750 

22-4252-073 

Contact: Assistant Professor, 

Georgia Institute of 

Technology. Department of 

Architecture, Atlanta. GA 

30332 



Gerontological Society 

FY 1978 

$6,840 

R80-42-20 

Contact: Project Director. 

Gerontological Society. 

1835 K Street. N.W., Suite 

305. Washington. DC 20006 



Graeff, Robert F. 

FY 1984 

$10,000 

41-4213-0132 

Contact: 1016 Highland 

Circle. Blacksburg. VA 

24060 



Hogan. Paul J. 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R71-42-54N 

Contact: 26 Buckwalter 

Road, Phoenixville. PA 

19460 



Hoglund. John David 

FY 1982 

$5,000 

21-4212-084 

Contact: 10016 Kendale 

Road. Potomac. MD 20854 



Hollerith. Richard. Jr. 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R81-42-49N 

Contact: RO. Box 827, 

Upper Montclair, NJ 07043 



To Study ways to improve the design of 
bathrooms to increase the convenience 
and safety of elderly persons. A study 
and research recommendations were pro- 
duced. 



To devise interior design solutions for 
small community-based homes for the 
mentally retarded. Post-occupancy eval- 
uations of sixteen homes in Georgia and 
Illinois were conducted by an interdisci- 
plinary design research team. A report, 
Living in the Community: A Study of 
Group Homes, addresses numerous is- 
sues and proposes a conceptual model. 



For a special issue of the Journal of 
Architectural Education on design and 
the aging. Grant support went to increas- 
ing the size of the issue by one-fourth 
and to distribution of 2,000 copies to in- 
dustrial and interior design teachers. 



To research, design and test a bathtub 
for elderly and disabled persons. The aim 
was to produce a tub design suitable not 
only for those with special needs but for 
the general public as well. 



To design prototype play and recre- 
ational equipment for handicapped chil- 
dren using cast-off materials such as 
poles, tires and reels. 



For research into translating the social/ 
behavioral goals of the mentally and 
physically handicapped into housing de- 
sign and management/operational crite- 
ria. A book entitled The Intangible 
Qualities of Housing: Privacy and Inde- 
pendence in Housing for the Elderly was 
published in 1983. 



To assess products used in everyday life 
according to the American National 
Standards for a barrier-free environment. 
An underlying concept of the study was 
that barrier-free products are easier and 
safer for the able-bodied to use as well as 
for the handicapped. 



Inquiring Systems. Inc. 

FY 1981 

$20,000 

12-4252-210 

Contact: Senior Associate, 

Inquiring Systems. Inc.. 

2532 Durant Avenue. Suite 

250. Berkeley. CA 94704 



Koncelik. Joseph A. 

FY 1978 

$9,760 

R81-42-I3N 

Contact: 1638 Dollivor 

Drive, Worthington, OH 

43085 



Koncelik. Joseph A. 

FY 1980 

$9,840 

0M213-170 

Contact: 1638 Dollivor 

Drive. Worthington. OH 

43085 



Leitner. Bernhard 

FY 1979 

$5,000 

91-4232-108 

Contact: 1 7 White Street, 

New York. NY 10013 



Loon and Heron Theater 

FY 1982 

$30,000 

22-4230-026 

Contact: Artistic Director. 

Loon and Heron Theater. 

169 Massachusetts Avenue, 

Boston, MA 021 15 



National Center for a 

Barrier-Free Environment 

FY 1981 

$35,000 

12-4221-238 

Contact: Executive Director. 

National Center for a 

Barrier-Free Environment. 

1 140 Connecticut Avenue. 

N.W, Suite 1006, 

Washington, DC 20036 



For research on the design of outdoor 
environments and their impact on the so- 
cial development of children with and 
without disabilities. A draft of a study 
was produced showing how the arts, in 
combination with a specially designed 
outdoor environment, can foster integra- 
tion of children with disabilities into the 
mainstream of community life. 



For research and development of a re- 
source compendium of architectural and 
building products appropriate for use in 
environments where the elderly reside. 



For a book that introduces and discusses 
the suitability of a wide variety of mass- 
produced products to the elderly, an in- 
creasingly large segment of the Ameri- 
can population. The book. Aging and the 
Product Environment, was published in 
1982 by Hutchinson Ross. 



To experiment with designing small-scale 
sound environments for use by visually 
impaired persons. 



For the design of a facility that addresses 
the accessibility needs of blind perform- 
ers and blind audience members. Among 
the design elements explored were sen- 
sory and sonic aids and tactile stripping 
for mobility. 



For an international conference on the 
state of the art of barrier-free design in 
the fields of architecture, landscape ar- 
chitecture, industrial design, interior de- 
sign, graphic design, and design educa- 
tion. 



DESIGN FOR INDIVIDUALS 165 



Pittsburgh Architects' 

Workshop 

FY 1978 

$5,970 

R80-42-168 

Contact: Pittsburgh 

Architects' Workshop, 237 

Oakland Avenue, 

Pittsburgh, PA 15213 



Polytechnic Institute of 

New York 

FY 1981 

$15,000 

12-4252-043 

Contact: Assistant Professor, 

Polytechnic Institute of 

New York, 333 Jay Street, 

Brooklyn, NY 11201 



Preiser, Wolfgang F. E. 
FY 1982 
$9,840 
21-4213-183 
Contact: Codirector, 
Institute for Environmental 
Education, 13304 Mountain 
Shadow, N.E., 
Albuquerque, NM 81111 



Project PLAE, Inc. 

FY 1985 

$40,000 

52-4252-0131 

Contact: President, Project 

PLAE, Inc. (Playing and 

Learning in Adaptable 

Environments), 1824A 

Fourth Street, Berkeley, CA 

94710 



Schneekloth, Lynda A. 

FY 1980 

$6,500 

01-4213-178 

Contact: 201 Monticello 

Lane, Blacksburg, VA 

24060 



Schofield, Kclley S. 

FY 1985 

$5,000 

51-4213-0056 

Contact: 108 Bantry Drive, 

Lake Mary, PL 32946 



To modify conventional play facilities for 
use by moderately handicapped children. 
A book, Access to Play: Design Criteria 
for Adaptation of Existing Playground 
Equipment for Use by Handicapped 
Children, was published in 1979. It sets 
forth design criteria, lists reference ma- 
terials and contains designs for specific 
structures that could be included in 
adapted play areas. 



To evaluate the housing-design needs of 
the blind and visually impaired, primar- 
ily by conducting a post-occupancy eval- 
uation of the Associated Blind, Inc., 
building in New York City. A report 
identified key psychological and behav- 
ioral needs of this population in housing. 



To produce a prototype design for a na- 
ture trail for visually and physically 
handicapped as well as able-bodied per- 
sons. The design featured an electromag- 
netic and tactile guidance system and a 
prerecorded user-activated information 
system. 



To develop guidelines for the design of 
play equipment for both able-bodied and 
disabled children. Most playgrounds 
have separate equipment for the two, and 
the children usually cannot play to- 
gether. The complexities of design, eco- 
nomics and education were explored 
from the viewpoint of several disciplines, 
and an extensive manual. Play for All, 
was produced. 



For investigations of the design of envi- 
ronments for visually impaired children 
and adults. 



To design a prototype ambulatory vehi- 
cle for disabled children, to increase 
their ability to interact with others. 



Shaw, Leiand G. 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R8I-42-50N 

Contact: Route I , Box 206, 

Micanopy, FL 32667 



Southcott, Marvin A. 

FY 1978 

$8,200 

R81-42-34N 

Contact: (>Q\ 14th Street, 

Bellingham, WA 98225 



Stephenson, Thomas E. 

FY 1980 

$8,500 

01-4213-179 

Contact: 424 Seventh 

Street, Del Mar, C A 92014 



Stephenson, Thomas E. 

FY 1983 

$5,000 

31-4213-00018 

Contact: Tesa Design, 424 

Seventh Street, Del Mar, 

CA 92014 



University of Colorado 

FY 1983 

$19,762 

32-4252-00126 

Contact: Community Design 

Director, University of 

Colorado, 1100 14th Street, 

Box 1 28, Denver, CO 80202 



University of Colorado at 

Denver 

FY 1986 

$3,000 

86-4256-0031 

Contact: Vice-Chancellor 

for Academic Affairs, 

University of Colorado a) 

Denver, 1100 14th Street, 

Denver, CO 80202 



To develop guidelines for planning more 
responsive play environments for handi- 
capped children. 



To create plans and drawings for equip- 
ment and therapeutic devices made with 
commonly available tools that could be 
built by handicapped persons or their 
friends and families. Each device was 
built and tested by the grantee and/or a 
team of volunteers. A book entitled Do- 
it-Yourself Aids for the Handicapped 
Child was published by the Western De- 
sign Center. 



To explore design possibilities for wheel- 
chairs. A report showed how wheelchairs 
could be designed to be neither cold nor 
institutional in appearance through the 
use of new materials, color, styling and 
human-factor analysis. 



To organize and disseminate information 
on advanced wheelchair design. Designs 
were documented in slides, and a report 
entitled Toward New Personal Vehicle 
Design was issued. 



To analyze how the visually impaired 
perceive architectural space and to de- 
vise and test techniques to allow for im- 
proved communication between designers 
and visually impaired persons. 



For a manual to aid designers in making 
buildings more accommodating to visu- 
ally impaired persons. 



166 CHAPTER FOUR 



University of Illinois 
FY 1986 
$22,700 
8M252-0I34 
Contact: Secretary, 
University of Illinois, 506 
South Wright, Urbana, IL 
61801 



University of Michigan 
FY 1984 
$40,000 
42-4252-0104 
Contact: Chairman, 
University of Michigan. 
School of Architecture. Ann 
Arbor, Ml 48109 



University of Minnesota 

FY 1984 

$29,604 

42-4252-0105 

Contact: Director, Office of 

Research Administration, 

University of Minnesota, 

1919 University Avenue, St. 

Paul, MN 55104 



University of New Mexico 
FY 1981 
$20,000 
12^252-213 
Contact: Codirector, 
Institute for Environmental 
Education, University of 
New Mexico, School of 
Architecture and Planning, 
Albuquerque. NM 87131 



University of Wisconsin, 

Madison 

FY 1979 

$5,000 

92^235-271 

Contact: University of 

Wisconsin, Madison. 750 

University Avenue, 

Madison, WI 53706 



University of Wisconsin, 

Milwaukee 

FY 1979 

$5,000 

92^235-272 

Contact: University of 

Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Box 

413, Milwaukee, WI 53201 



To develop and test alternative design 
approaches for housing facilities for el- 
derly and severely disabled adults. The 
goal was to develop criteria to guide de- 
signers in space allocation and product 
selection to support independent life- 
styles for the severely disabled. 



For research on the ways in which ad- 
vancing age alters people's perceptions of 
their environment in order to improve de- 
sign planning for the elderly. A report, 
Life Space Over the Life Span, studied 
the progressive constrictions and limits 
on the elderly and their changes in val- 
ues and perceptions. 



For a study by the School of Architec- 
ture on design for the developmentally 
disabled. The institutional environment is 
often conducive to abnormal behavior. A 
report provided a systematic study of a 
broad range of settings and proposed de- 
sign criteria and principles as a basis for 
evaluation. 



To develop a prototypical tactile building 
directory and sensory guidance system to 
guide the visually impaired in public 
buildings. 



To develop a teaching method to in- 
crease design students' understanding of 
the physical needs of persons with dis- 
abilities. A teachers' manual. Introduc- 
ing Accessibility, was produced, and lec- 
tures, slide shows and exercises that 
simulate the limitations of the disabled 
were developed. 



To develop an effective teaching proce- 
dure for training students to program 
and design for the needs of the handi- 
capped. A manual. Teaching Design for 
Mainstreaming the Handicapped, was 
produced. 



University of Wisconsin. 

Milwaukee 

FY 1984 

$30,000 

42-4256-0089 

Contact: Assistant to the 

Dean. University of 

Wisconsin. Milwaukee, PO. 

Box 413, Milwaukee, WI 

53201 



Western Massachusetts 

Training Consortium. Inc. 

FY 1981 

$20,000 

12-4250-256 

Contact: Director, Western 

Massachusetts Training 

Consortium, Inc., 

Massachusetts College of 

Art, 26 Overland Street, 

Boston, MA 02215 



Worchester Area 

Transitional Housing, Inc. 

FY 1980 

$20,610 

02-4252-151 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Worchester Area 

Transitional Housing, Inc., 

507 Main Street, 

Worchester, MA 01608 



Yamasaki, Kim 

FY 1980 

$10,000 

01-4213-180 

Contact: Route 1, Box 

138B,Yoncella, OR 94799 



To translate the results of basic design 
research into design guidelines. The ar- 
eas of research were congregate housing 
for the elderly and community housing 
facilities for the severely handicapped. 



For a program of national activities pro- 
moting adaptive design for the disabled: 
two conferences, four seminars and a de- 
sign competition. The project focused on 
design issues and training methods and 
was aimed both at rehabilitation profes- 
sionals and design professionals. A re- 
port, Teaching Design for All People, 
was produced. 



For the research phase of designing a 
prototypical residence for people with se- 
vere physical disabilities. The effect of 
environment on behavior and well-being 
was the primary focus of the research. 
This focus was considered a fundamental 
starting point in the creation of an im- 
proved design. 



For a study on design of housing for the 
elderly. Guidelines were issued in a re- 
port. Shelter for the Aging, which con- 
tains drawings, sketches and specifica- 
tions. The research was based on 
interviews, investigations of existing fa- 
cilities and a search of the literature. 



DESIGN FOR INDIVIDUALS 167 



Projects for Children 

Design projects for children's education and recreation. In- 
cludes projects to educate young audiences about design, 
the built environment and their role in both. 



Alternative Energy 

Resources 

FY 1982 

$7,500 

22-4250^64 

Contact: Project Director, 

Alternative Energy 

Resources, 601 Power 

Block, Helena, MT 59601 



American Institute of 

Architects Foundation, Inc. 

FY 1983 

$25,000 

32-423000176 

Contact: Program Director, 

American Inst4tute of 

Architects Foundation, Inc., 

1735 New York Avenue, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20006 



American Institute of 

Architects, Iowa Chapter 

FY 1987 

$10,000 

87-4251-0105 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Iowa Arts Council, State 

Capitol Complex, 1223 East 

Court Avenue, Des Moines, 

I A 50319 



Americas Behavioral 

Research Corporation 

FY 1979 

$29,850 

92-4212-213 

Contact: Senior Research 

Associate, Americas 

Behavioral Research 

Corporation, 300 Broadway, 

San Francisco, CA 94133 



Associated Colleges of the 

Mid-Hudson Area 

FY 1977 

$7,500 

R70-42-23 

Contact: Director of 

Program Development, 

Associated Colleges of the 

Mid-Hudson Area, 9 Vassar 

Street, Poughkeepsie, NY 

12601 



To tour an interactive play for elemen- 
tary children through Montana schools. 
The play illustrates design concepts of 
solar energy and energy conservation and 
encourages children to put these into 
practice as adults. 



For a national design competition for 
grammar school children. The aim was 
to heighten children's creative, visual 
and design skills through a design pro- 
gram devised by representatives of the 
National Association of State Art Agen- 
cies, the National Education Association 
and the American Institute of Architects 
Foundation. 



To expand and promote Iowa's Architec- 
ture in the Schools project. The project's 
goal was to incorporate architecture 
appreciation into elementary and secon- 
dary school curricula. 



To produce a workbook-format publica- 
tion on the participation and importance 
of young people in the design process. 



To conduct multidisciplinary workshops 
in play-environment education. The goal 
was to have workshop staff and volun- 
teers plan and execute a well-designed, 
permanent neighborhood play facility for 
the participating community. 



Association for the Care of 

Children's Health 

FY 1987 

$40,000 

87-4251-0171 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Association for the Care of 

Children's Health, 3615 

Wisconsin Avenue, N.W., 

Washington, DC 20016 



Board of Public Education 
for the City of Savannah 
and County of Chatham 
FY 1986 
$20,000 
86-4256-0024 
Contact: Superintendent, 
Board of Public Education 
for the City of Savannah 
and County of Chatham, 
208 Bull Street, Savannah, 
GA 31401 



Board of Public Education 

for the City of Savannah 

FY 1980 

$15,000 

02-4250-138 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Board of Public Education 

for the City of Savannah, 

Curriculum and Staff 

Development, 208 Bull 

Street, Savannah, GA 

31401 



Boston Children's Museum 

FY 1979 

$23,940 

92-4212-142 

Contact: Director, Visitors' 

Center, Boston Children's 

Museum, 300 Congress 

Street, Boston, MA 02210 



Boston Children's Museum 

FY 1981 

$10,600 

12-4250-194 

Contact: Director, Exhibit 

Center, Boston Children's 

Museum, Museum Wharf, 

300 Congress Street, 

Boston, MA 021 10 



Boston Children's Museum 

FY 1985 

$25,935 

52-4256-0103 

Contact: Associate Director, 

Boston Children's Museum, 

300 Congress Street, 

Boston, MA 02210 



For a competition among advanced ar- 
chitecture students for the design of an 
ambulatory children's health facility. 
Millions of children receive care in am- 
bulatory outpatient facilities each year 
The aim is to generate facility designs 
that are supportive of the children, their 
families and the staff. 



To produce a videotape of the Massie 
Heritage Center's Classroom Program, 
which introduces Savannah students to 
their architectural heritage. The program 
instilled a sense of place and local history 
and imparted a knowledge of architec- 
tural styles and the components of a city. 



To produce the Heritage Classroom Pro- 
gram at Massie School. The program 
was designed to increase knowledge and 
understanding of Savannah's history, city 
plan and architecture through interdisci- 
plinary mini-units in English, art, ar- 
chitecture, math, science and social stud- 
ies. 



For a three-story exhibition of a house, 
street and yard that incorporates cross- 
sectional views showing the changes in 
needs and design issues from Victorian 
Boston to the present. 



To complete the fabrication of City 
Slice, a three-floor exhibit of a house, 
street and yard with cross-section views 
revealing the changing needs and design 
issues over the past century — from Vic- 
torian Boston to the present. 



To design and execute several interactive 
exhibits on issues in architecture and ur- 
ban design. The exhibit featured subjects 
such as city infrastructures, water trans- 
portation systems and water-, solar- and 
wind-powered installations. 



168 CHAPTER FOUR 



Boston Children's Museum 

FY 1985 

$28,985 

52-4256-0006 

Contact: Associate Director, 

Boston Children's Museum. 

Museum Wharf, 300 

Congress Street. Boston. 

MA 02210 



Boston Children's Museum 

FY 1987 

$29,950 

87-4251-0009 

Contact: Director. Boston 

Children's Museum. 300 

Congress Street, Boston. 

MA 02210 



Boys Choir of Harlem 

FY 1982 

$8,000 

22-4230-194 

Contact: Executive Director. 

Boys Choir of Harlem. 550 

West 155lh Street. New 

York, NY 10032 



Capitol Children's Museum 

FY 1979 

$20,000 

92-4211-006 

Contact: Executive Director. 

Capitol Children's Museum. 

800 Third Street. N.E.. 

Washington. DC 20002 



Capitol Children's Museum 

FY 1981 

$15,000 

12-4230-020 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Capitol Children's Museum. 

800 Third Street. N.E.. 

Washington. DC 20002 



Center for City-Building 

Educational Programs 

FY 1981 

$25,000 

12-4250-195 

Contact: Director. Center 

for City-Building 

Educational Programs. 2210 

Wilshire Boulevard. Suite 

303. Santa Monica, CA 

90403 



To produce an interactive exhibition, 
Works on Paper, to introduce the design 
decision-making process and the graphic 
design process to children. The exhibit 
posed design problems and provided the 
materials and equipment for children to 
experiment with possible solutions to 
graphic design problems. 



To develop, design and produce three 
"exhibits in a kit." The kits consist not 
only of plans, but also of narratives, pro- 
gram design, graphic design and tech- 
nical information to enable museums and 
science centers to replicate successful ex- 
hibits at Boston's Children's Museum. 



For architectural consultation and a fea- 
sibility study to enable the Boys Choir of 
Harlem to consider alternative sites for a 
permanent home within the Harlem com- 
munity. 



To develop a master plan for a perma- 
nent home for the National Children's 
Museum. 



For planning and design for the develof>- 
ment of the Capitol Children's Muse- 
um's grounds and exterior areas as a 
"learning ground." 



To produce the publication Transforma- 
tions, Process and Theory: A Curricu- 
lum Guide to Creative Development as 
part of the City Building Education se- 
ries for children and teenagers. 



Children's Museum, Inc. 
FY 1978 
$6,465 
R8(>42-138 
Contact: Director, 
Children's Museum, Inc.. 
RO. Box 1617, Pawtucket, 
Rl 02862 



Children's Museum of 

Denver 

FY 1980 

$17,000 

02-4254-048 

Contact: Director, 

Children's Museum of 

Denver. 93 1 Bannock 

Street, Denver, CO 80104 



Crowhurst-Lennard, 

Suzanne H. 

FY 1979 

$5,000 

91-4231-205 

Contact: Library Lane. 

Woodstock. NY 12498 



Educational Futures. Inc. 

FY 1977 

$32,100 

R70-42-168N 

Contact: Educational 

Futures. Inc.. 2118 Spruce 

Street. Philadelphia, PA 

19103 



Educational Futures. Inc. 

FY 1978 

$22,060 

R8(>42-115N 

Contact: Executive Director. 

Educational Futures, Inc., 

P.O. Box 13507. 

Philadelphia. PA 19101 



Educational Futures, Inc. 

FY 1979 

$17,029 

92^235-131 

Contact: Project 

Coordinator, Educational 

Futures. Inc.. 2118 Spruce 

Street, Philadelphia, PA 

19103 



To establish a hands-on learning center 
for children in the Pitcher-Goff Mansion. 
The aim was to devise an adaptive use 
plan that specified the most appropriate 
spaces for arts activities. 



To develop a design and master plan for 
a children's museum located along the 
Platte River Greenway and to research 
alternative energy sources for the 
project. 



To perform investigations of how chil- 
dren judge and evaluate architectural 
space. A report summarized the child's 
conception of architectural space, includ- 
ing such areas as textures, materials, 
size, light and geometry. 



To assist the Architects-in-Schools pro- 
gram, a nationwide initiative at the ele- 
mentary and secondary school levels. 
Through the program, architects, land- 
scape architects, planners and designers 
acted as resource persons to involve stu- 
dents, teachers and the community in the 
design process. A report documented the 
project. 



To document and evaluate the Archi- 
tects-in-Schools program. Through the 
program architects and landscape archi- 
tects were placed in residencies in ele- 
mentary and secondary schools to de- 
velop learning materials and projects on 
the built environment. 



To introduce an architects-in-residence 
pilot project into the programming of the 
Please Touch Museum in Philadelphia. 
Through the program architects worked 
with children and adults in various areas 
pertaining to design and the built envi- 
ronment. 



DESIGN FOR INDIVIDUALS 1 69 



Fraunces Tavern Museum 
FY 1979 
$12,325 
92-4212-041 
Conlaci: Curator of 
Education, Fraunces Tavern 
Museum, 54 Pearl Street, 
New York, NY 10004 



Friedberg, M. Paul 

FY 1981 

$15,000 

11-4215-217 

Conlaci: 36 West 62nd 

Street. New York, NY 

10023 



Lishka, Gerald R. 

FY 1982 

$2,500 

21-4213-6114 

Conlaci: Principal Interior 

Designer, Schimpeler- 

Llshka Associates. 1429 

South Third Street, 

Louisville. KY 40208 



Los Angeles Children's 

Museum 

FY 1982 

$15,200 

22-4230-200 

Conlaci: Executive Director, 

Los Angeles Children's 

Museum, 310 Main Street, 

Los Angeles, C A 90012 



LuckyRides, Inc. 

FY 1987 

$32,600 

87-4251-0156 

Conlaci: President, 

LuckyRides, Inc., 210 Clark 

Avenue, Bradford, CT 

06405 



Magic House 

FY 1978 

$5,000 

R80-42-73 

Conlaci: Cochairman, The 

Magic House, 9 Black 

Creek Lane, St. Louis, MO 

63124 



McRae, John 

FY 1977 

$9,850 

R7I-42-5N 

Conlaci: University of 

Florida, College of 

Architecture, Gainesville, 

FL 32611 



For a program to involve children in the 
design and restoration of historic build- 
ings on the Fraunces Tavern block. The 
aim was to stimulate children's aware- 
ness of the built environment. 



To write a book on the social and physi- 
cal effects of designed environments on 
children, including an overview of the re- 
search that documents the importance of 
environment enrichment in urban areas. 



To conduct research for the design and 
construction of a specialized music stu- 
dio environment for children. 



For architectural design planning for the 
Los Angeles Children's Museum Perfor- 
mance Space, a participatory theater ex- 
hibit. The project is the first of its kind 
in an experiential museum and the only 
performance space in Los Angeles de- 
voted solely to children. 



To build an innovative carousel for the 
New Haven elementary schools. The aim 
was to provide children with a multisen- 
sory arts experience and to teach them 
about the integration of aesthetics and 
engineering. 



To design a museum for children in St. 
Louis, Missouri. 



To develop material on the built environ- 
ment for use in elementary school grades 
three to five. A teachers' resource guide, 
student workbook, filmslrip and an illus- 
trated library resource book were pro- 
duced. 



Pittsburgh Architects 

Workshop, Inc. 

FY 1986 

$32,550 

86-4256-0181 

Conlaci: Executive Director, 

Pittsburgh Architects 

Workshop, Inc., 237 

Oakland Avenue, 

Pittsburgh, PA 15213 



Please Touch Museum 

FY 1986 

$28,000 

86-4256-0083 

Conlaci: President, Board of 

Directors, Please Touch 

Museum, 210 North 21st 

Street, Philadelphia, PA 

19103 



Portland Public Schools 
FY 1983 
$6,000 

32-4250-00043 
Conlaci: Grants Manager, 
Portland Public Schools, 
PO. Box 3107. Portland, 
OR 97208 



Providence School 

Department 

FY 1977 

$16,985 

R70-42-161 

Conlaci: Project Director, 

Providence School 

Department, 150 

Washington Street, 

Providence, Rl 02903 



For the Design/ Build program, a hands- 
on course for students from the Pitts- 
burgh public and private schools. The 
program involved the design and con- 
struction of simple projects to impart an 
understanding of how the built environ- 
ment is created. Intensive teacher train- 
ing was also planned to ensure the pro- 
gram's continuation. 



For the exhibit Building Block Art. The 
exhibit provided children with hands-on 
activities with blocks to encourage under- 
standing of the built environment and 
gave adults an introduction to architec- 
tural history and information on how to 
encourage design education. An ac- 
companying catalogue was produced. 



To assist Portland's Architecture Alive 
program, an alternative public school 
learning experience. The aims were to in- 
still in children an understanding of the 
built environment and a critical eye to- 
ward architecture. 



For an urban design education program 
in Providence, Rhode Island. The pro- 
gram included activities focused on the 
discovery, communication and improve- 
ment of physical resources in pupils' 
neighborhoods and a catalogue of urban 
design resources for teachers. 




Project PLAE (Playing and Learning in Adaptable Environments) 
created designs for play equipment that can be used by both able- 
bodied and handicapped children, so they can play together. 



170 CHAPTER FOUR 



Research Foundation of the 
City University of New 
York (CUNY) 
FY 1982 
$30,000 
22-4252-079 
Contact: Associate 
Professor. CUNY Research 
Foundation, Center for 
Human Environments, 
Environmental Psychology 
Department, New York, 
NY 1003b 



Research Foundation of the 

City University of New 

York 

FY 1984 

$39,930 

42-4252-0100 

Contact: Director, Office of 

Sponsored Research, 

CUNY Research 

Foundation. 33 West 42nd 

Street, New York, NY 

10036 



Richmond Hill High School 

FY 1978 

$1,590 

R80-42-5I 

Contact: Fine Arts 

Instructor, Richmond Hill 

High School, 89-30 114th 

Street, Richmond Hill, NY 

11418 



Rosen, Deborah 

FY 1983 

$5,000 

3M2I2-00I36 

Contact: 24700 McBean, 

No. JG-32 Valencia. New 

York, NY 91355 



San Jose Children's 

Discovery Museum 

FY 1985 

$30,000 

52-4231-0095 

Contact: Business Manager, 

San Jose Children's 

Discovery Museum, PO. 

Box 9433, San Jose, CA 

95157 



Schimpeler, Suzanne M. 

FY 1982 

$2,500 

21-4213-6101 

Contact: Principal, 

Schimpeler-Lishka 

Associates, 1 429 South 

Third Street, Louisville. KY 

40208 



To investigate and evaluate a process by 
which children can come to understand 
the nature of environmental change. The 
process involves "imaging" alternative 
futures as a mechanism through which 
children may participate in the design of 
their surroundings. A report. Imaging 
and Creating Alternative Environments 
with Children, documented the process. 



For a program to facilitate ongoing eval- 
uation and modification of playgrounds 
by management staff. The multistage 
project, conducted by the Center for Hu- 
man Environment, included a design 
competition to produce a new playground 
serving both able-bodied and exceptional 
children, research inviting children's par- 
ticipation and workshops and training for 
park personnel. 



To beautify an elevated railway station 
and to perform other neighborhood im- 
provements with the active participation 
of students from Richmond Hill High 
School. 



To prepare a Young Designer's Note- 
book, an introductory workbook aimed at 
increasing elementary school students' 
design awareness and basic design prob- 
lem-solving skills. 



To develop architectural designs for a 
new 40,000-square-foot children's mu- 
seum on a three-acre site in a San Jose 
city park. 



To research and develop a solution to de- 
sign problems confronting the Children's 
Studio. 



Trinidad Junior Historical 

Society. Inc. 

FY 1982 

$250 

22-4230-037 

Contact: President, Trinidad 

Junior Historical Society, 

PO. Box 307, Trinidad. CO 

81082 



University of Wisconsin, 

Milwaukee 

FY 1981 

$10,000 

12-4252-046 

Contact: Assistant Professor, 

University of Wisconsin, 

Milwaukee, PO. Box 413, 

Milwaukee, WI 53201 



University of Wisconsin, 

Milwaukee 

FY 1984 

$14,460 

42-4252-0111 

Contact: Chairman, 

Department of Architecture, 

University of Wisconsin, 

Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 

53201 



University of Texas at San 

Antonio 

FY 1980 

$9,000 

02-4251-014 

Contact: President, 

University of Texas at San 

Antonio, San Antonio, TX 

78285 



Van Wagener, Sterling G. 
FY 1980 
$4,000 
01-4210-042 
Contact: Coyote 
Productions, Arrow Press 
Square, No. 2, Salt Lake 
City, UT 84101 



Virginia Polytechnic 

Institute and State 

University 

FY 1978 

$5,000 

R80-42-153 

Contact: Assistant Dean, 

Virginia Polytechnic 

Institute and State 

University, 201 Cowgill 

Hall, Blacksburg,VA 24061 



To design and develop a children's mu- 
seum to serve the largest county in Colo- 
rado. The museum's proposed location 
was the historic Old Fire House Number 
One, once the site of the city hall, jail 
and fire station. 



For research on children's outdoor play 
and learning environments. The aim was 
to examine the effects of the 
sociophysical environment on children's 
behavior. A study report was produced. 



For research on the planning and design 
of children's museums. The results were 
published as Museums and Children: A 
Design Guide. 



To develop and disseminate a filmstrip 
and teachers' guide on the built environ- 
ment for the instruction of Texas school 
children, grades six through eight. 



To develop ideas for a storyline for an 
animated film on children's awareness of 
the built environment. 



To produce experimental films that 
teach design principles to children 
through different forms of participation. 



DESIGN FOR INDIVIDUALS 171 



Vision, Inc. 

FY 1979 

$30,000 

92-4212-157 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Vision, Inc., 678 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

Cambridge, MA 02139 



Vision, Inc. 

FY 1985 

$15,000 

52-4256-0123 

Contact: President, Vision, 

Inc., 219 Concord Avenue, 

Cambridge, MA 02 138 



To produce educational audiovisual ma- 
terials introducing the built environment 
to students and teachers. 



To produce a model for an educational 
computer program based on the success- 
ful Street-Smart Built Environment Edu- 
cation Program. The Street-Smart pro- 
gram consisted of an audiovisual package 
for elementary and secondary students 
and has reached thousands of children, 
teachers, parents and community orga- 
nizations, both nationwide and abroad, 
since 1979. 




5 



Design Education 
and Professional 
Advancement 



The Vietnam Veterans Memo- 
rial on the Mall in Washing- 
ton. D.C.. commemorates by 
name the more than 58,000 
Americans who died in Viet- 
nam. The memorial won a 
Presidential Design Award. 



"If you can look into the seeds of time and say which grain 
will grow and which will not, speak," says Banquo in Shake- 
speare's Macbeth. The challenge is not unlike that faced by 
Design Arts panels, who study the many proposals for books, 
journals, articles, films and exhibits and must decide which 
ones to recommend for funding and which to reject. 

No panel can accurately predict which ideas will come to 
fruition and which will not, especially when it comes to judg- 
ing applications for fellowships from young and unknown 
designers. It is not difficult, of course, to find the major 
projects that will contribute toward the advancement of the 
design arts professions, and the Design Arts Program is proud 
to fund them. But the panels also take some calculated risks 
on ideas that might provide an entirely new perspective on a 
subject or spark a new line of inquiry and research. (It is 
worth recalling that an unknown architecture student, Maya 
Ying Lin, won the design competition that resulted in the 
Vietnam Memorial; and this memorial, according to the Presi- 
dential Design Awards jury, "has changed the way war monu- 
ments — and monuments as a whole — are perceived: as the 
creation of an integral space rather than an object.") 

The grants in this chapter are intended to advance the 
design arts field. They do this in several ways — by offering 
designers fellowships so that they might grow professionally; 
by supporting research projects that will advance knowledge; 
by improving the design curricula for designers-to-be; and by 
enhancing communication among designers and the general 
public through films, exhibits, workshops. 

Some grants have funded monumental publication projects 
of undoubted value to the design fields: for example, the 
Architectural History Foundation's four-volume edition of the 
sketchbooks of Le Corbusier; M.I.T.'s The Federal Presence: 
Architecture. Politics and National Design; and The Ameri- 
can Mosaic: Preserving the Cultural Heritage of the United 
States by the U.S. International Council on Monuments and 
Sites. Other grants have gone to riskier projects that explored 
intriguing topics: how the movies have affected our ideas of 
what our cities and homes should look like (Donald Albrecht. 
1982); what the outlook is for women architects (Ellen Berke- 
ley, 1987); the relationship between people and architecture 
(William S. Merwin, 1984); how our changing view of public 
life alTects the design of public spaces (Lois Craig, 1978) and 



174 CHAPTER FIVE 



.^uaC 




Research is the key to the con- 
tinued growth and vitality of 
the design professions. Photo 
shows a few of the books 
started or completed on grants 
from the Design Arts Program. 



Dksi(;\ ^^' 
A\IEKKA 




why there is so little wit in contemporary architecture (Ann 
Schubert, 1981). 

Similarly, a range of journals and magazines has been 
funded: from influential journals such as the Walker Art 
Center's Design Quarterly and M.I.T.'s Place, to magazines 
that filled a need for a time and then ceased publication. 

A number of exhibitions listed here made substantial con- 
tributions to the field; among them: the Detroit Institute of 
Art's exhibition on the contributions of the Cranbrook Acad- 
emy of Art to design, which produced a catalogue, Design in 
America: The Cranbrook Vision, 1925-50; the preservation 
and restoration of 136 of Frank Lloyd Wright's drawings, 
which were among the 500 that Wright considered most rep- 
resentative of his work; and the Walker Art Center's major 
exhibition of the architecture of Frank O. Gehry, which in- 
cluded not only drawings, photographs and models but a full- 
scale environment to house the materials. On a less grand 
scale, the Massachusetts College of Art mounted a charming 
exhibition. Designed in Boston — 350 Years of Innovation, 
which included the safety razor, clipper ship, subway car, 
fireplug and Olmsted's "emerald necklace" of parks; and the 
Maryland Institute College of Art produced Graphic Arts: 
From Idea to Image, an exhibition showing how designers 
make decisions. 

Films are an important part of design education for practi- 
tioners, students and the general public. Design Arts grants 
aided in the production of a number of films documenting the 
works of American designers: Philip Johnson, Christopher 
Alexander, William Morris, Charles Fames, Raymond 
Loewy, Paul Rudolph. The New York Foundation for the 
Arts produced The Architecture of Mies van der Rohe, a 
dramatized biographical film on Frank Lloyd Wright and a 
film on the work of Robert Venturi as well as videotaped 
interviews with such American architects as Philip Johnson, 
Robert Venturi, Jaquelin Robertson, Hugh Jacobson and 
Emilio Ambasz. 

Design Arts grants supported a range of educational activi- 
ties: sending college students to the International Design Con- 
ferences in Aspen, Colorado; pilot programs for new college 
courses in historic preservation, environmental design and 
architectural conservation; development of such resources as 
Rochester Institute of Technology's videodisc archive on the 
history of graphic design; the three-dimensional computer- 
modeling system developed by Harvard's Laboratory for 
Computer Graphics; guidebooks to help people manage de- 
sign competitions; as well as the Rhode Island School of 
Design's exploration of the influence of space technology 
upon design. It is not possible to know which of the projects 
will be influential and which will not, but it is certain that no 
profession can truly thrive without the influx of new ideas 
represented by many of the projects here. 



DESIGN EDUCATION AND PROFESSIONAL ADVANCEMENT 175 



Books, Journals and Articles 



Albrecht, Donald 

FY 1982 

$10,000 

21-4213-092 

Conlacl. 237 East 54th 

Street, Apt. 3C, New York, 

NY 10022 



American Institute of 
Architects Foundation 
FY 1977 
$10,000 
R70-42-54 
Conlacl: President, 
Annerican Institute of 
Architects Foundation, 1799 
New York Avenue, N.W., 
Washington, DC 20006 



American Institute of 

Graphic Arts 

FY 1983 

$18,200 

32-4250-00025 

Conlacl: Assistant Director, 

American Institute of 

Graphic Arts, 1059 Third 

Avenue, New York, NY 

10021 



Anderes, Fred 

FY 1980 

$10,000 

01-4210-225 

Conlacl: 40\ East 91 si 

Street, New York, NY 

10028 



Architectural Arts of 

Washington, D.C. 

FY 1982 

$25,000 

22-4250-225 

Conlacl: Executive Director, 

Architectural Arts of 

Washington, DC, 4101 W 

Street, N.W., Suite 301, 

Washington, DC 20007 



Architectural History 

Foundation 

FY 1980 

$20,000 

02-4250-107 

Conlacl: Managing Editor, 

Architectural History 

Foundation, 157 East 70th 

Street, New York. NY 

10021 



For a book on the perceptions of modern 
architecture held by film directors and 
set designers of the 1920s and 1930s. 
The aim was to determine the reasons 
and processes by which modern architec- 
ture was absorbed and used to promul- 
gate a new lifestyle. 



For the Journal of Architectural Re- 
search. Grant support permitted meet- 
ings and activities of the U.S. editorial 
board and broader dissemination of the 
journal. 



For the Journal of Graphic Design, a 
publication providing information to the 
graphic design field, including a national 
calendar of events and articles on current 
developments. 



To research the history of ice palaces 
and other unusual ice structures, to pro- 
duce an illustrated history of ice struc- 
tures and to experiment and create origi- 
nal designs in ice. A 1 30-page book 
entitled Ice Palaces was published in 
1983 by Abbeville Press. 



For six issues of Design Action, a bi- 
monthly architecture and design newslet- 
ter and calendar of events. Design Action 
focuses on design issues in Washington, 
D.C, Virginia and Maryland. 



To publish the first volume of a work on 
Le Corbusier's sketchbooks. The sketch- 
books illustrate the intimate relationship 
between Le Corbusier's architecture, 
planning, painting, sculpture, writing and 
humanistic beliefs. A $30,000 amend- 
ment, grant number 12-4250-9009, was 
made in 1981. 



Architectural History 

Foundation 

FY 1982 

$10,000 

22-4250-041 

Conlacl: Managing Editor, 

Architectural History 

Foundation, 157 East 70th 

Street, New York, NY 

10021 



Architectural History 

Foundation 

FY 1983 

$6,000 

32-4250-00096 

Conlacl: Managing Editor, 

Architectural History 

Foundation, 350 Madison 

Avenue, New York, NY 

10017 



To publish Le Corbusier: Sketchbooks, 
1957-1964, the last of a four-volume 
work. 



Architectural League of 

New York 

FY 1987 

$18,000 

87-4251-0021 

Conlacl: Executive Director, 

Architectural League of 

New York, 457 Madison 

Avenue, New York, NY 

10022 



Architectural Research 

Centers Consortium 

FY 1981 

$25,000 

12-4221-139 

Conlacl: Vice-President, 

Architectural Research 

Centers Consortium, 1735 

New York Avenue, N.W, 

Washington, DC 20006 



Architectural Research 
Centers Consortium 
FY 1985 
$12,000 
52-4252-0129 
Conlacl: Executive 
Committee. Architectural 
Research Centers 
Consortium, 1735 New 
York Avenue, N.W., 
Washington, DC 20006 



To prepare the illustrations for the publi- 
cation Campus: An American Planning 
Tradition, by Paul Turner. The book 
provides a survey of this American archi- 
tectural type, a unique kind of architec- 
ture and urban planning that treats col- 
lege campuses as miniature cities. It was 
published in 1984 by the foundation and 
M.I.T Press. A paperback edition ap- 
peared in 1987. 



For a book, film series, symposium and 
documentary film on the way New York 
City has been represented in film. The 
aim was to examine the hundreds of 
films about the city in two ways: as an 
urban history through which the city's 
evolving physical form can be traced and 
as a mythical city loosely based on the 
real one, but with a life of its own. 



To determine the ways in which architec- 
tural research should develop as an activ- 
ity central to design, construction and 
evaluation of the tenant environment. 



To develop case studies of architecture 
and design firms of various sizes and 
types. The aim was to determine the con- 
nection between design excellence and a 
firm's management practices, organiza- 
tional structure and relations with cli- 
ents. 



176 CHAPTER FIVE 



Art Center College of 

Design 

FY 1984 

$25,200 

42-4256-0041 

Contact: President, Art 

Center College of Design, 

1700 Lida Street, Pasadena, 

CA91103 



Arts and Architecture 

Magazine 

FY 1983 

$6,500 

32-42500098 

Contact: Managing Editor, 

Arts & Architecture 

Magazine, The Schindler 

House, 835 North Kings 

Road. Los Angeles, CA 

90069 



Atlanta Art Papers, Inc. 

FY 1987 

$10,000 

87-4251-0092 

Contact: Managing Editor, 

Atlanta Art Papers, Inc., 

RO. Box 77346, Atlanta, 

GA 30357 



Berkeley, Ellen 
FY 1987 
$10,000 
87-4216-0147 
Contact: Box 311, 
Shaftsbury, VT 05262 



Billington, David R 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R71.42-40N 

Contact: 23 University 

Place, Princeton, NJ 08540 



To publish a guide for architects on 
space frame design, to fill a void in the 
available information about the design 
and use of long-span structures. 



Blake, Peter J. 

FY 1984 

$15,000 

41-4213-0114 

Contact: The Catholic 

University of America, 

Department of Architecture 

and Planning, Washington, 

DC 20064 



For an issue of Arts & Architecture mag- 
azine on Utopias and futurism. The issue 
examines sites such as Liano del Rio in 
Southern California (a community 
founded by freed slaves) and Salt Lake 
City, founded as a religious center. It 
also evaluates the new towns of Irvine, 
Valencia and Westlake Village twenty 
years after their founding. 



For the annual architecture issue of the 
Atlanta Art Papers, to be produced in 
collaboration with the Architecture Soci- 
ety of Atlanta. 



For a book on women architects discuss- 
ing current activities and speculating on 
future aspects of women's place in the 
field. 



For a study of the ideas of Swiss struc- 
tural designer Robert Maillart (1872- 
1940). The aim was to show how his 
ideas might be applied to contemporary 
American public works. Four papers 
were published and presented at various 
symposia. 



To prepare material for a book about the 
leaders of the modern Utopian movement 
in architecture and design in Europe, 
Asia and North America. The aim was 
to document this rapidly receding past 
that is largely unfamiliar to today's stu- 
dents and young architects. 



Bletter, Rosemarie H. 
FY 1984 
$10,000 
4M213-0129 
Contact: 560 Riverside 
Drive, No. 2L, New York, 
NY 10027 



Bloomfield, Julia M. 

FY 1983 

$10,000 

31-4213-00141 

Contact: 66 East 83rd 

Street, New York, NY 

10028 



Branch, Melville C. 

FY 1977 

$5,000 

R71-42-12N 

Contact: 1 505 Sorrento 

Drive, Pacific Palisades, CA 

90272 



California Polytechnic State 

University 

FY 1982 

$5,000 

22-4250-226 

Contact: Associate 

Professor, California 

Polytechnic State 

University, Architecture 

Department, San Luis 

Obispo, CA 93407 



Carlhian, Jean Paul 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R81-42-44N 

Contact: 219 Heath's Bridge 

Road, Concord, MA 01742 



Chang, Ching-Yu 

FY 1981 

$9,000 

11-4213-261 

Contact: Architect, 344 

Audubon Road, Englewood, 

NJ 07631 



Cole, Doris A. 

FY 1981 

$9,000 

11-4213-262 

Contact: Architect/ 

Principal, Cole and Goyette, 

593 Annursnac Hill, 

Concord, MA 01742 



For a study of American architecture 
from 1945 to 1985. The aim was to trace 
underlying currents: the influences of 
European modernism and the American 
political, social, economic and artistic cli- 
mates on American architecture styles. 



To create the initial graphic design and 
mock-up for a magazine on contempo- 
rary architectural works and thought in 
relation to broader issues of culture and 
politics. 



For a comparative survey of nineteenth- 
century urban design. 



To prepare a report documenting the 
ninth annual National Design Village 
Conference held in April 1983. The 
event involves over 100 architectural and 
environmental design students. The re- 
port is entitled Romanticism — Rational- 
ism. 



To prepare a report and slides analyzing 
and documenting the teaching methods 
of the Ecole des Beaux Arts. 



To produce a two-volume work entitled 
Japanese Spatial Conception, which dis- 
cusses the difference between Japanese 
and Western aesthetic and spatial princi- 
ples. 



To prepare a monograph, Howe, Man- 
ning and Almy, Architects, 1895-1937. 
The monograph treats the work of the 
architectural firm's three partners: Lois 
Lilley Howe, Eleanor Manning and 
Mary Almy. The work discusses their 
perspectives, work processes and design 
products. 



DESIGN EDUCATION AND PROFESSIONAL ADVANCEMENT 177 



Cooper Union for the 

Advancement of Science 

and Art 

FY 1980 

$80,000 

02-4253-013 

Contact: President, Cooper 

Union for the Advancement 

of Science and Art, 41 

Cooper Square, New York, 

NY 10003 



Cooper Union for the 

Advancement of Science 

and Art 

FY 1987 

$10,000 

87-4251-0024 

Contact: Vice-President for 

Policy, Cooper Union for 

the Advancement of 

Science and Art, 41 Cooper 

Square, New York, NY 

10003 



Cornell University 
FY 1981 
$13,997 
12-425W)26 
Contact: Professor of 
Architecture, Cornell 
University, 123 Day Hall, 
Ithaca, NY 14853 



Costonis, John J. 
FY 1983 
$10,000 
31-4213-00011 
Contact: Professor, New 
York University Law 
School, 40 Washington 
Square South, New York, 
NY 10012 



Craig, Lois A. 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R81-42-9N 

Contact: 24 Cedar Lane 

Way, Boston, MA 02108 



Darden, J. Douglas 
FY 1984 
$5,000 

41-4213-0122 
Contact: Clipper Mill 
Studio, 3409 Parkdale 
Avenue, Baltimore, MD 
21211 



To write, publish and distribute a publi- 
cation on the recipients of the National 
Design Awards Program and selected 
Design Arts grantees. The aim was to 
share the lessons learned in the process 
of solving design problems. Design Arts 
I, a 1 60-page publication, was published 
in 1980. 



For the first book in a series of critical 
and historical works on preeminent 
American graphic designers. 



To prepare materials for a report on 
projects from the Graduate Studio of Ur- 
ban Design at Cornell University. Under 
the direction of Colin Rowe the studio 
has developed a contextual urban design 
theory, a body of design investigations 
that study general and specific qualities 
of urban space and buildingt> 



To write a manuscript entitled Icons and 
Aliens: The Strained Marriage of Law 
and Aesthetics. The work discusses the 
effects of public policy-making on aes- 
thetic issues in such areas as historic and 
environmental preservation. 



For a series of essays on the relationship 
between design of public spaces and 
changing ideas of public life. Each essay 
was based on a specific design, including 
examples of federal buildings. 



To research the changing relationships 
among American manufacturing pro- 
cesses, work ideals and industrial ar- 
chitecture. 



DeHarak, Rudolph 

FY 1981 

$8,500 

11-4213-089 

Contact: 2\i East 19th 

Street, New York, NY 

10003 



Design Foundation 

FY 1979 

$30,000 

92-4235-118 

Contact: Director, Institute 

for Urban Design, State 

University of New York at 

Purchase, Purchase, NY 

10577 



Eames, Ray 

FY 1983 

$15,000 

31-4215-00020 

Contact: Designer, Office of 

Charles and Ray Eames, 

901 Washington Boulevard, 

Venice, CA 90291 



Eberhard, John R 

FY 1981 

$13,450 

CA 81-34 

Contact: 821 1 Stone Trail 

Drive, Bethesda, MD 20817 



Eisenman, Peter D. 
FY 1985 
$10,000 
51-4213-0143 
Contact: Eisenman 
Robertson Architects, 560 
Fifth Avenue, New York, 
NY 10018 



Paul, Roberta 

FY 1978 

$29,500 

PC 78-46 

Contact: 2920 44th Place, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20015 



Feiss, Carl 

FY 1983 

$15,000 

31-4215-00167 

Comacr. 3716 S.W. Third 

Place, Gainesville, FL 

32607 



For research on the history and develop- 
ment of graphic design in the twentieth 
century. 



To redesign Urban Design magazine and 
related publications and to commence 
publishing them under the auspices of 
the Institute for Urban Design. Urban 
Design is aimed at architects, planners, 
landscape architects, developers and gov- 
ernment agencies concerned with im- 
proving the quality of American cities. 



To compile a written and photographic 
record of the work of the office of 
Charles and Ray Eames. The account 
documented numerous projects: architec- 
ture, toys, furniture, lectures, exhibitions 
and films. 



To publish a guide to the federal govern- 
ment for building industry design profes- 
sionals. 



To perform research on two themes: "the 
end of the classical" and the "not classi- 
cal." The first is based on the thesis that 
a classical, traditional attitude has domi- 
nated architecture for the last 400 years 
and the second discusses potential strate- 
gies for creating an architecture outside 
the classical tradition. 



For theme publications on selected Arts 
Endowment grants and for publication of 
a two-year supplement to By Design. 



For a historical review of the grantee's 
career in urban design, historic preserva- 
tion and planning. An article entitled 
"The Foundations of Federal Planning 
Assistance" was published in the Ameri- 
can Planning Association's journal in 
spring 1985. 



178 CHAPTER FIVE 



Feldman, Melissa 

FY 1984 

$5,000 

41-4213-0123 

Contact: 55 Morton Street, 

New York, NY 10014 



Filippone, Andrea J. 

FY 1986 

$9,450 

86-4213-0104 

Contact: 22 Hilltop Circle, 

Morristown, NJ 07960 



Frampton, Kenneth B. 
FY 1983 
$15,000 
3M215-00164 
Contact: Professor, 
Columbia University, 561 
Broadway, New York, NY 
10012 



Freeman. John R. 

FY 1982 

$5,000 

21-4213-172 

Contact: 1 1 8 Warren Street, 

Arlington, MA 02174 



Friends of the School of 

Architecture 

FY 1983 

$2,940 

32-4250-00105 

Contact: Director, Friends 

of the School of 

Architecture, 920 North 

Michigan Avenue, Chicago, 

IL 60611 



Giurgola, Romaldo 

FY 1981 

$8,000 

11-4215-120 

Contact: 4 East 89th Street, 

New York, NY 10028 



Goldsmith, Myron 

FY 1987 

$20,000 

87-4214-0043 

Contact: 503 Central 

Avenue, Wilmette. IL 

60091 



To publish the spring/summer 1985 is- 
sue of Stroll, an art, architecture and de- 
sign magazine devoted to communication 
structures and objects in the street. The 
issue includes articles by design critics, 
artists and designers. 



To write an annotated and illustrated 
catalogue/guidebook on existing build- 
ings designed by Le Corbusier. 



To analyze the critical-regionalist ap- 
proach to architecture from both theoret- 
ical and practical standpoints. 



For a study to aid architects in creating 
new building shapes from the analysis of 
building structure. 



To produce volume two of Threshold, 
the journal of the school of architecture 
at the University of Illinois at Chicago 
Circle. The journal provides a forum for 
architects, educators and students. 



For a book on the works and philosophies 
of Eliel and Eero Saarinen, including his- 
torical, critical and design aspects. 



To complete a book entitled Myron 
Goldsmith: Buildings and Concepts. 



Gratz, Roberta B. 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R71-42-4N 

Contact: 25 Central Park 

West, New York, NY 

10023 



Group for Environmental 
Design 
FY 1983 
$10,000 
32-4250-00034 
Contact: Director, Group 
for Environmental Design, 
302 Arch Street. 
Philadelphia, PA 19106 



Gutheim, Frederick 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R81-42-47N 

Contact: 1750 Pennsylvania 

Avenue, N.W., Suite 308, 

Washington, DC 20006 



Gutman, Robert 

FY 1982 

$42,874 

DCA 82-2 

Contact: 200 Hun Road, 

Princeton, NJ 08540 



Hayden, Dolores 

FY 1981 

$9,000 

11-4213-225 

Contact: Associate 

Professor, University of 

California, Los Angeles, 

School of Architecture and 

Urban Planning, Los 

Angeles, CA 90024 



Hejduk, John Q. 
FY 1983 
$10,000 
31-4213-00148 
Contact: Dean, Cooper 
Union School of 
Architecture, Cooper 
Square, New York, NY 
10003 



For a book that explains preservation as 
a vital issue for communities across the 
country and suggests improvements to 
available preservation mechanisms. 



For the graphic design of a manuscript 
for a book on the notebooks and 
drawings of architect Louis Kahn. 



To prepare a reference book explaining 
the planning and design concepts of 
neighborhood revitalization and historic 
preservation. 



To publish two monographs: Architec- 
tural Practice: A Critical View and The 
Design of American Housing. 



For research on the influence of Thomas 
Jefferson, Catherine Beecher, Frederick 
Law Olmsted, Jane Addams, Abraham 
Levitt and Walt Disney on the develop- 
ment of public policy and its effect on 
Americans' perception of the built envi- 
ronment. 



To complete final drawings, sketches and 
support material for the "rural masque," 
an exposition of the rural environment. A 
book. The Mask of Medusa, resulted 
from the project. 



DESIGN EDUCATION AND PROFESSIONAL ADVANCEMENT 179 



Henderson, Susan R. 

FY 1985 

$10,000 

51-4213-0144 

Contact: 24 First Street, 

Brooklyn, NY 11231 



Inland Architect Press 

FY 1980 

$25,000 

02-4251-010 

Contact: Business Manager, 

Inland Architect Press, 

American Institute of 

Architects Chicago 

Chapter, 310 South 

Michigan Avenue, Chicago, 

IL 60604 



Institute for Architecture 

and Urban Studies 

FY 1981 

$20,000 

12-4250007 

Contact: Director, Public 

Programs, Institute for 

Architecture and Urban 

Studies, 8 West 40th Street, 

New York, NY 10018 



Institute for Urban Design 

FY 1980 

$17,500 

02-4250-067 

Contact: Director, Institute 

for Urban Design, State 

University of New York at 

Purchase, Main PO. Box 

105, Purchase, NY 10577 



Institute for Urban Design 

FY 1981 

$10,000 

12-4250-172 

Contact: Director, Institute 

for Urban Design, State 

University of New York at 

Purchase, Main PO. Box 

105, Purchase, NY 10577 



Institute for Urban Design 

FY 1984 

$30,000 

42-4256-0096 

Contact: Director, Institute 

for Urban Design, PO. Box 

105, Purchase, NY 10577 



To write a monograph entitled The Ar- 
chitecture and City Planning of Ernst 
May, 1921-1930. May, a German mod- 
ernist, was one of many European archi- 
tects who experimented with architecture 
in order to create new social environ- 
ments. The study seeics to discover what 
became of the modernists' social commit- 
ment and to what extent they achieved 
their Utopian goals. 



To expand the magazine's editorial for- 
mat and circulation and to reorganize its 
operations. 



To publish Skyline, a monthly newspa- 
per on architecture and design with a na- 
tional circulation. The purpose of Sky- 
line is to bridge the gap between the 
visual arts and architecture, planning 
and design. 



For a special conference issue of Urban 
Design International (January-February 
1981) and a promotional piece for a 
membership and subscription drive. 



For a special issue of Urban Design In- 
ternational magazine on the objectives of 
urban design education. 



To publish two special issues of Urban 
Design International, one on compe- 
titions in the United States and a second 
on competitions abroad. 



International Design 
Education Foundation 
FY 1980 
$16,000 
CA 80-27 
Contact: President, 
International Design 
Education Foundation, 5900 
Wilshire Boulevard, Los 
Angeles, CA 90036 



Iowa State University 
FY 1981 
$11,000 
12-4252-041 
Contact: Associate 
Professor, Iowa State 
University, Department of 
Architecture, College of 
Design, Ames, I A 5001 1 



Jacobs, Herbert A. 

FY 1977 

$7,545 

R71-42-19N 

Contact: 1001 Euclid 

Avenue, Berkeley, CA 

94708 



Kaplan, Sam Hall 

FY 1986 

$10,000 

86-4213-0044 

Contact: 823 20th Street, 

Santa Monica, CA 90403 



Karmi-Melamede, Ada 
FY 1984 
$9,500 
41-4213-0135 
Contact: Columbia 
University, Department of 
Architecture and Planning, 
400 Avery Hall, New York, 
NY 10027 



To prepare and publish Form and Pur- 
pose: Is the Emperor Naked?, a book 
written by Moshe Safdie. The book is a 
philosophical discussion of the need to 
create buildings that fit their purposes 
and surroundings. It was published in 
1980. 



For a study of the effects of regulatory 
measures on building design and con- 
struction, using the single-family home as 
an illustrative example. 



To research and annotate documents re- 
lated to the construction of two of Frank 
Lloyd Wright's "usonian" houses. 



To perform research for a book that ex- 
amines and celebrates the design ele- 
ments that imbue a city with a vivid and 
unique character and a sense of place. 



To document the development of modern 
architecture in Palestine between 1925 
and 1948. The works of fifty architects 
who emigrated to Palestine from Europe 
were compiled from archives and private 
collections. 




A 1980 grant to Fred Anderes and Ann Agranoff to research the 
history of ice palaces and other unusual ice structures resulted in 
this 130-page book published in 1983 by Abbeville Press. 



180 CHAPTER FIVE 



Kingston Artists' Group 

FY 1982 

$17,000 

22-4250-231 

Contact: Chairman, 

Kingston Artists' Group, 24 

Abeel Street, Kingston, NY 

12401 



Kleinsasser, William 

FY 1987 

$10,000 

87-4216-0056 

Contact: University of 

Oregon, Department of 

Architecture, Eugene, OR 

97403 



Kliment, Stephen 

FY 1987 

$16,510 

NEA DCA 87-41 

Contact: 120 East 81st 

Street, New York, NY 

10028 



Kostellow, Rowena R. 
FY 1982 
$15,000 
21-4215-088 
Contact: Professor 
Emeritus, Pratt Institute, 
143 Greene Street, New 
York, NY 10012 



Lalvani, Haresh 
FY 1982 
$3,200 
21-4213-097 
Contact: Associate 
Professor, Pratt Institute, 
3 1 7 Washington Avenue, 
Brooklyn, NY 11205 



Larson, Magali S. 

FY 1981 

$5,000 

1M2 13-093 

Contact: 5 1 1 Woodland 

Terrace, Philadelphia, PA 

19104 



Lee, Sharon R. 

FY 1981 

$5,000 

11-4213-095 

Contact: 1 700 Camino 

Lindo, South Pasadena, CA 

91030 



To produce a special issue of Visions 
Magazine documenting the state-of-the- 
art contributions of minorities and 
women to the fields of architecture, 
graphic design and clothing design. 



To prepare a manuscript on the architec- 
tural theory of place — the considerations 
that underlie the design of places that 
work well for people. 



To assist in the development of a chapter 
of the State-of-the-Arts Report from the 
Design Arts Program. 



For a study on the structure of three-di- 
mensional visual relationships. The pur- 
pose was to show that there is a struc- 
tural discipline — comparable to that 
underlying music — which may serve as a 
basic guide to the understanding of 
sculpture, architecture and industrial de- 
sign. 



To document cross-cultural geometric 
patterns in architecture and artifacts in 
the cultures of India, Nepal and Tibet. 
Three articles were produced as part of 
the series. Papers in Theoretical Mor- 
phology. 



To investigate the impact of modernism 
on American architecture and to produce 
a sociological study. The Professional 
Supply of Design, on the institutions that 
shape designers' outlooks and careers. 



To study architectural conservation in It- 
aly, with special focus on methods that 
integrate design theory, economics, ad- 
ministration and legal aspects. 



Libeskind, Daniel 

FY 1983 

$10,000 

31-4213-00155 

Contact: 500 Lone Pine 

Road, Box 801, Bloomfield 

Hills, MI 48013 



Llebman, Rosanna G. 

FY 1985 

$5,000 

51-4213-0140 

Contact: 1 838 Fendall 

Avenue, Charlottesville, VA 

22903 



Lipske, Mike 

FY 1984 

$34,000 

DCA 84-72 

Contact: 3030 Wisconsin 

Avenue, N.W., Apt. 9, 

Washington, DC 20036 



Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology 

FY 1978 

$17,805 

R80-42-25 

Contact: Assistant Professor 

of Architecture, 

Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology, 77 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

Cambridge, MA 02138 



Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology 

FY 1978 

$16,420 

R80-42-60 

Contact: MIT Press, 

Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology, 77 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

Cambridge, MA 02139 



Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology 

FY 1981 

$35,000 

12-4250-029 

Contact: Dean of 

Architecture, Massachusetts 

Institute of Technology, 77 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

Cambridge, MA 02139 



To research the crisis of values in con- 
temporary architecture. A manuscript 
entitled A Poetic Reawakening was pro- 
duced. 



To write a monograph about the Ameri- 
can work of Pierre Chareau (1883- 
1950), the French designer and architect. 
The focus was on his role in introducing 
European modernism to America. 



To write and design two publications: 
Places as Art and Artists Housing: Cre- 
ating Live/Work Space That Lasts. 



For research on trends in urban zoning 
regulations. Urban zoning models were 
tested as regulatory tools for urban form 
and density definition. 



To complete The Federal Presence: Ar- 
chitecture, Politics and National Design, 
a history of government architecture and 
the federal influence on the design of 
American space. The book was written 
by Lois Craig and the staff of the Fed- 
eral Architecture Project. 



To develop a quarterly magazine. Places, 
devoted to the relations of society and 
culture to form and space. The magazine 
deals with theory as a means of under- 
standing reality, not as a end in itself. 



DESIGN EDUCATION AND PROFESSIONAL ADVANCEMENT 181 



Merwin, William S. 

FY 1984 

$10,000 

41-4213-00010 

Contact: Department of 

Humanities, Cooper Square, 

Cooper Union for the 

Advancement of Science 

and Art, New York, NY 

10003 



M.I.T. Press 

FY 1981 

$23,130 

12-4250-200 

Contact: Journals Manager, 

MIT. Press, 77 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

Cambridge, MA 02139 



MIT. Press 

FY 1984 

$10,000 

42-4255-0082 

Contact: Director, Office of 

Sponsored Programs, 

Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology, 28 Carleton 

Street, Cambridge, MA 

02142 



Municipal Art Society 

FY 1981 

$88,000 

12-4253-149 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Municipal Art Society, 457 

Madison Avenue, New 

York, NY 10022 



Nagle, James L. 

FY 1984 

$15,000 

41-4213-0117 

Contact: Nagle, Hatry and 

Associates, Ltd., 230 East 

Ohio Street, Chicago, IL 

606 1 1 



New York Landmarks 

Conservancy 

FY 1987 

$30,000 

87-4251-0020 

Contact: Executive Director, 

New York Landmarks 

Conservancy, 330 West 

42nd Street, New York, NY 

10036 



To compile two collections of essays ex- 
ploring the relationship between people 
and architecture. A book entitled The 
Rain in the Trees was published in 1988. 



To translate and publish the journal 
Space and Society, previously published 
only in Italian. 



To publish a paperback edition of The 
Federal Presence: Architecture, Politics 
and National Design. 



To write, publish and distribute publica- 
tions on projects included in the second 
national Grants Recognition Program. 
The publications document exemplary 
projects of selected grantees. Two 
amendments were made: grant number 
12-4253-149.1 for $12,000 in 1981, and 
grant number 22-4253-9149.1 in 1982. 



For research on the processes by which 
different styles of architecture have been 
reinterpreted and "Americanized."A 
manuscript entitled The Americanization 
of Architectural Style resulted. 



For the Technical Preservation Services 
Centers, a three-year program of publica- 
tions, workshops and community pro- 
grams. The centers' mission was to re- 
search technical preservation problems, 
provide up-to-date information and de- 
velop model guidelines. Technical reports 
on facades, maintenance and window re- 
habilitation were issued, as well as a res- 
toration directory. 



Nyberg, Folke E. 

FY 1979 

$8,450 

91-4232-110 

Contact: 11(>5 North 56th 

Street, Seattle, WA 98103 



Nyberg, Folke 

FY 1985 

$8,500 

51-4213-0149 

Contact: 2265 North 56th 

Street, Seattle, WA 98103 



Parley, Michael L. 

FY 1981 

$5,000 

11-4213-101 

Contact: 42 West 83rd 

Street, New York, NY 

10024 



Parsons, Kermit C. 

FY 1984 

$10,000 

41-4213-0143 

Contact: Cornell University, 

117 West Sildey Hall, 

Ithaca, NY 14853 



Partners for Livable Places 
FY 1985 
$74,705 

NEA DCA 85-50 
Contact: President, Partners 
for Livable Places, 1429 
21st Street, N.W, 
Washington, DC 20036 



Preservation League of New 

York State 

FY 1980 

$10,350 

02-4251-012 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Preservation League of New 

York State, 1 3 Northern 

Boulevard, Albany, NY 

12210 



For research aimed at identifying a 
northwest regional architecture. Several 
articles and lectures issued from the 
project. 



For the Theory of Architectural Genres, 
a report on the importance of conven- 
tions in design in the United States. A 
summary entitled "Modernism and Con- 
vention" was presented at a conference 
at the University of Minnesota and an 
article was published in Midgrad, a Uni- 
versity of Minnesota publication. 



To continue research for a book that pro- 
vides insight into the ways in which New 
York City has been physically designed 
and formed by diverse forces present 
since its beginnings. 



To prepare key letters and unpublished 
reports of Clarence S. Stein for publica- 
tion. Stein, who was awarded the gold 
medal of the American Institute of Ar- 
chitects in 1937, was a pivotal figure in 
American architecture, urban planning 
and community design. 



To prepare four publications to follow 
initiatives undertaken by the Design Arts 
Program. 



To research a series of syndicated news- 
paper stories that treat the economic, his- 
toric and social significance of historic 
preservation in New York State. 



182 CHAPTER FIVE 



Publishing Center for 
Cultural Resources 
FY 1983 
$49,975 
32-4250-00118 
Contact: Director, 
Publishing Center for 
Cultural Resources, 625 
Broadway, New York, NY 
10012 



Publishing Center for 

Cultural Resources 

FY 1984 

$65,475 

42-4255-0056 

Contact: Director, 

Publishing Center for 

Cultural Resources, 625 

Broadway, New York, NY 

10012 



Renesselaer Polytechnic 
Institute 
FY 1983 
$15,000 
32^252-00058 
Contact: Director of 
Contracts and Grants, 
Renesselaer Polytechnic 
Institute, Troy, NY 12181 



Richard Nickel Committee 

FY 1978 

$22,000 

R80-42-95 

Contact: Richard Nickel 

Committee, 3152 North 

Cambridge, Chicago, IL 

60657 



Rochester Institute of 

Technology 

FY 1984 

$20,000 

42-4255-0058 

Contact: Vice-President, 

Rochester Institute of 

Technology, Box 9887, One 

Lomb Memorial Drive, 

Rochester, NY 14623 



Rossant, James 

FY 1983 

$15,000 

31-4215-00021 

Contact: Partner, Conklin 

and Rossant, 1 14 Sullivan 

Street, New York. NY 

10012 



To reprint and distribute publications 
originally supported by grants from the 
Design Arts Program. A centralized dis- 
tribution program was set up and cata- 
logue was prepared and disseminated. 



For printing and distribution of three 
publications: a brochure entitled "A 
Guide to Historic Preservation" and two 
books: Places as Art and Space for 
Dance. 



For an art and architecture thesaurus, a 
cross-referenced guide to the vocabulary 
used by the profession. The aim was to 
provide a resource for designers, archi- 
tectural researchers, librarians and slide 
curators, especially those computerizing 
their collections. Ten thousand terms and 
definitions were collected. 



To compile materials for a comprehen- 
sive book about Dankmar Adler and 
Louis Sullivan, pioneers of the modern 
movement in architecture. Together they 
designed more than one hundred struc- 
tures. 



To complete a paperback book, The 
First Symposium on the History of 
Graphic Design — Coming of Age. The 
book documents presentations made at 
an international symposium on the his- 
tory of graphic design held at Rochester 
Institute of Technology in April 1983. 



To produce and prepare for publication a 
series of drawings depicting urban form. 
The drawings investigate various future 
possibilities in built form such as the im- 
pact of technology on city form and 
structure. 



Rovinelli, H. Paul 

FY 1985 

$10,000 

51-4213-0065 

Contact: 2325 42nd Street, 

N.W., Apt. 410, 

Washington, DC 20007 



Ryan, Beatrice Farrar 

FY 1978 

$4,990 

R8I-42-40N 

Contact: 1 808 Federal 

Avenue East, Seattle, WA 

98102 



Safdie, Moshe 

FY 1980 

$7,500 

01-4210-039 

Contact: Moshe Safdie and 

Associates, Inc., 2 Faneuil 

Hall Marketplace, Boston, 

MA 02109 



Satkowski, Leon G. 
FY 1985 
$4,100 

51-4213-0150 
Contact: Syracuse 
University, School of 
Architecture, 103 Slocum 
Hall, Syracuse, NY 13210 



Schubert, Ann N. 

FY 1981 

$5,000 

11-4212-115 

Contact: 351 Woodward 

Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14214 



Segal, David 

FY 1977 

$9,825 

R71-42-25N 

Contact: Harvard 

University, Department of 

City and Regional Planning, 

Gund Hall, Cambridge, MA 

02138 



Smith, Kathryn A. 

FY 1981 

$5,000 

11-4213-107 

Contact: 833 North Kings 

Road, Los Angeles, CA 

90069 



For two articles and a lecture on the rele- 
vance to contemporary architecture of 
the later work of Dutch architect, H. B. 
Berlage (1856-1934). Unlike his widely 
known early work, the work of Berlage's 
last two decades shows a return to cer- 
tain traditional approaches, a blend of 
modern functionalism with traditional 
craft forms. 



To conduct case-study interviews with 
urban planners and designers in the 
Netherlands. The aim was to document 
their work with respect to environmental 
continuity. 



To support preparation of a book entitled 
Form and Purpose: Is the Emperor Na- 
ked?. 



To prepare analytical drawings of build- 
ings by Giorgio Vasari, the sixteenth-cen- 
tury Italian architect. 



To prepare a manuscript entitled Wit 
and Humor in Architecture. The work 
explores the relative scarcity of wit in 
building design and documents existing 
examples of funny buildings from an- 
cient times to the present. 



For a book on the economics of preserv- 
ing neighborhoods and buildings in cities. 



For a monograph entitled A California 
Romanza: Frank Lloyd Wright 's Olive 
Hill for Aline Barnsdall. The work fo- 
cuses on the architectural designs for 
forty-five buildings designed and exe- 
cuted between 1915 and 1924. 



DESIGN EDUCATION AND PROFESSIONAL ADVANCEMENT 183 



Society of Architectural 

Historians 

FY 1979 

$13,310 

92-4212-202 

Contact: Editor, Society of 

Architectural Historians, 

1700 Walnut Street, Room 

716, Philadelphia, PA 

19103 



Society of Architectural 

Historians 

FY 1982 

$9,760 

22-4250-154 

Contact: Treasurer, Society 

of Architectural Historians, 

1700 Walnut Street, Suite 

716, Philadelphia, PA 

19103 



Spencer, Brian A. 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R8 1-42-5 IN 

Contact: 8219 Currie 

Avenue, Wauwatosa, Wl 

53213 



Sprague, Paul E. 

FY 1980 

$7,500 

01-4210-040 

Contact: 37835 Atkins 

Knoll Road, Oconomowoc, 

WI 53066 



Stephens, Suzanne L. 

FY 1985 

$10,000 

51-4213-0153 

Contact: 30 East 37th 

Street, New York, NY 

10016 



Suissman, Douglas R. 

FY 1987 

$10,000 

87-4216-0130 

Contact: 1931 Barry 

Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 

90025 



Szabo, Albert 

FY 1980 

$7,500 

01-4210-041 

Contact: Carpenter Center, 

Harvard University, 24 

Quincy Street, Cambridge, 

MA 02138 



For an editor for the Journal of the So- 
ciety of Architectural Historians. 



For continued publication of the Journal 
of the Society of Architectural Histori- 
ans. The journal contains jury-selected 
articles, news and book reviews and 
serves architectural historians and pres- 
ervationists in academia and government. 



To develop a survey and review of pro- 
fessional architectural practices and ex- 
isting architectural archives, with empha- 
sis on facilities, management, use and 
funding. 



To edit and prepare for publication a 
book entitled The Concept of Visual 
Analysis and Its Application to Historic 
Preservation. 



For a history of American architectural 
criticism from 1850 to 1980. 



For a work analyzing the relationship be- 
tween architecture and movement in 
American cities, in particular the 
changes brought about through the ele- 
vator and the automobile and the result- 
ing impoverishment of public life. 



To prepare materials for a publication on 
the indigenous architecture of Afghani- 
stan. 



Testa, Peter A. 

FY 1985 

$5,000 

51-4213-0141 

Contact: 1627 Cornell 

Avenue, Berkeley, CA 

34702 



Tigerman, Stanley 

FY 1982 

$15,000 

21-4215-165 

Contact: Professor of 

Architecture, University of 

Illinois, Chicago Campus, 

920 North Michigan 

Avenue, Chicago, IL 6061 1 



Trustees of Columbia 

University 

FY 1986 

$25,000 

86-4256-0034 

Contact: Trustees of 

Columbia University, Office 

of Projects and Grants, New 

York, NY 10027 



United States Committee 

for the International 

Council of Monuments and 

Sites (US/ICOMOS) 

FY 1986 

$30,000 

86-4256-0019 

Contact: Chairman, US/ 

ICOMOS, 1600 H Street, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20006 



University of Illinois at 

Chicago Circle 

FY 1983 

$15,000 

32-4250-00108 

Contact: Assistant Professor, 

University of Illinois at 

Chicago Circle, School of 

Art and Design, RO. Box 

4348, Chicago, IL 60680 



University of Illinois at 

Chicago Circle 

FY 1985 

$16,000 

52-4256-0039 

Contact: Associate Vice- 

Chancellor for Research, 

University of Illinois at 

Chicago Circle, PO. Box 

4348, Chicago, I L 60680 



To prepare materials for a book on the 
work of Portuguese architect Alvaro 
Siza. Siza's writings were analyzed to 
clarify the theoretical framework of his 
architecture. 



For a work that defines the distinction 
between post-modernism as an American 
movement and neorationalism as a Euro- 
pean movement. 



For first-year editorial and production 
costs for four volumes of the Buell Docu- 
ments on American Architecture. 



To prepare a book. The American Mo- 
saic: Preserving A Nation's Heritage, fo- 
cusing on the U.S. preservation move- 
ment. The book was used as background 
reading for the US/ICOMOS Eighth 
General Assembly and has been adopted 
as a university text. It was published in 
1987 and edited by Robert E. Stipe and 
Antoinette J. Lee. 



To support the promotion and publica- 
tion of the first two issues of Design Is- 
sues, a journal of design history, theory 
and criticism focusing on current topics 
in industrial and graphic design. 



For two volumes of Design Issues, a 
semi-annual journal of design history, 
theory and criticism. Design Issues is 
published by the School of Art and De- 
sign at the University of Illinois at Chi- 
cago and addresses issues crucial to de- 
sign education. 



184 CHAPTER FIVE 



University of Southern 
California 
FY 1986 
$30,200 
86-4256-0182 
Contact: Senior Vice- 
President. Academic 
Affairs, University of 
Southern California, 
University Park. Los 
Angeles, CA 90089 



University of Virginia 

FY 1980 

$8,541 

02-4250-141 

Contact: Associate Professor 

of Architecture, University 

of Virginia, Charlottesville, 

VA 22903 



University of Virginia 

FY 1982 

$7,030 

22-4250-069 

Contact: Associate Professor 

of Architecture, University 

of Virginia, Campbell Hall, 

Charlottesville, VA 22903 



Virginia Polytechnic 

Institute and State 

University 

FY 1981 

$15,000 

12-4252-044 

Contact: Virginia 

Polytechnic Institute and 

State University, College of 

Architecture, Blacksburg, 

VA 24061 



Virginia Polytechnic 
Institute and State 
University 
FY 1984 
$12,500 
42-4252-01 10 
Contact: Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute and 
State University, Office of 
Special Programs. 301 
Burruss Hall. Blacksburg, 
VA 24061 



Vision, Inc. 

FY 1981 

$10,000 

12-4250-039 

Contact: Vice-President, 

Vision, Inc., 678 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

Cambridge, MA 02139 



To document the restoration of the his- 
toric Freeman residence, one of Frank 
Lloyd Wright's three textile-block houses 
of 1924. The house is a rare example of 
Wright's experiments in construction 
technology, and it was furnished and 
added to by Rudolph Schindler. 



For the student publication. Modulus, 
the architectural review of the University 
of Virginia. The journal provides a learn- 
ing experience for students, both in the 
art and craft of publishing and in pro- 
ducing a journal of theoretical discus- 
sion. 



To expand the student publication Mod- 
ulus, the architectural review of the Uni- 
versity. 



For a study of aerodynamic forms of 
buildings. Research involved mathemati- 
cal modeling, computer evaluation and 
wind-tunnel testing. 



To research the international market for 
U.S. design services. The U.S. share of 
the markets dropped from fifty percent 
in the mid-1970s to thirty percent in 
1982, partly because other industrialized 
countries increased their promotion of 
overseas sales of quality design and de- 
sign services. 



To develop a design communication 
manual that discusses fundamental as- 
pects of design communication theory 
and describes creative applications of the 
design communication process. 



Walker Art Center 
FY 1984 
$40,000 
42-4256-0016 
Contact: Design Curator, 
Walker Art Center, 
Vineland Place, 
Minneapolis, MN 55403 



Walker Art Center 
FY 1985 
$40,000 
52^256-0045 
Contact: Assistant 
Controller, Walker Art 
Center, Vineland Place, 
Minneapolis, MN 55403 



Windsor, Kenneth R. 

FY 1982 

$8,500 

21-4213-109 

Contact: Graphic Designer, 

25-67 41st Street, Long 

Island City, NY 11103 



Women in Design 

International 

FY 1982 

$7,500 

22-4250-072 

Contact: Competition 

Director, Women in Design 

International, RO. Box 

7468, San Francisco, CA 

94119 



Wurman, Richard Saul 

FY 1979 

$9,000 

91-4232-113 

Contact: California State 

Polytechnic University, 

School of Envirnomental 

Design, Pomona, CA 91768 



Zeisel, Eva S. 
FY 1986 
$10,000 
86-4213-0109 
Contact: 5825 South 
Dorchester Avenue, 
Chicago, IL 60637 



To support publication of Design Quar- 
terly for one year. In spring 1983, M.I.T. 
Press began publication and distribution 
of Design Quarterly, while the Walker 
Art Center retained editorial and design 
responsibilities. The goals of this joint 
venture were to increase the visibility of 
the magazine and broaden its readership. 



To publish seven issues of Design Quar- 
terly, the only design periodical regularly 
published by an American museum of 
art. Under this grant new graphic design 
techniques were developed, original 
works were commissioned from photogra- 
phers and writers, and the journal was 
expanded. 



To study the influences of the avant- 
garde movements of Russia and Eastern 
Europe on post-modernist trends in 
American graphic design. 



To publish the first annual international 
compendium of work by women design- 
ers, featuring the results of a compe- 
tition. 



To edit and compile for publication the 
speeches, notebooks and conversations of 
architect Louis Kahn. 



To explore and define a designer's vocab- 
ulary, the way in which designers com- 
municate emotional responses through 
the control of form, line and color. 



DESIGN EDUCATION AND PROFESSIONAL ADVANCEMENT 185 



Fellowships, Awards and Research Studies 



Agar, Charles E. 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

91-4231-170 

Contact: 125 Dogwood 

Lane, Athens, GA 30606 



American Academy in 

Rome 

FY 1977 

$40,000 

R7(M2-175 

Contact: Executive 

Secretary, American 

Academy in Rome, 41 East 

65th Street, New York, NY 

10021 



American Academy in 

Rome 

FY 1978 

$40,000 

R8 1-42-34 

Contact: Executive 

Secretary, American 

Academy in Rome, 41 East 

65th Street, New York, NY 

10021 



American Academy in 

Rome 

FY 1979 

$40,000 

92-4231-092 

Contact: Executive 

Secretary, American 

Academy in Rome, 41 East 

65th Street, New York, NY 

10021 



American Academy in 

Rome 

FY 1980 

$40,000 

02-4214-021 

Contact: President, 

American Academy in 

Rome, 41 East 65th Street, 

New York, NY 10021 



American Academy in 

Rome 

FY 1981 

$45,000 

12-4221-134 

Contact: Director, American 

Academy in Rome, 41 East 

65th Street, New York, NY 

10021 



For an accomplished professional fellow- 
ship in design. A report with slides was 
produced, Casebook: Two Cities After 
Two Decades, on Springfield, Illinois, 
and Duluth, Minnesota. 



To provide four six-month fellowships to 
mid-career professionals in design. The 
fellows were selected by a special jury of 
professionals in the fields of architecture, 
landscape architecture and environmen- 
tal design. 



To provide four six-month fellowships to 
mid-career professionals in design. 



For the design arts and architecture fel- 
lowship program for mid-career design 
professionals at the American Academy 
in Rome. 



For the mid-career fellowship program in 
design arts and architecture of the Amer- 
ican Academy in Rome. 



To allow four designers to spend six 
months at the American Academy in 
Rome. The fellows focused on areas of 
current concern in design and the arts. 



American Academy in 

Rome 

FY 1982 

$35,000 

22-4215-121 

Contact: President, 

American Academy in 

Rome, 41 East 65th Street, 

New York, NY 10021 



American Academy in 

Rome 

FY 1982 

$20,000 

22-4215-170 

Contact: President, 

American Academy in 

Rome, 41 East 65th Street, 

New York, NY 10021 



American Academy in 

Rome 

FY 1983 

$60,000 

32-4215-00024 

Contact: President, 

American Academy in 

Rome, 41 East 65th Street, 

New York, NY 10021 



American Academy in 

Rome 

FY 1985 

$68,500 

52-4213-0135 

Contact: President, 

American Academy in 

Rome, 41 East 65th Street, 

New York, NY 10021 



American Academy in 

Rome 

FY 1987 

$50,000 

87-4218-0153 

Contact: President, 

American Academy in 

Rome, 41 East 65th Street, 

New York, NY 10021 



American Institute of 

Architects Research 

Corporation 

FY 1977 

$16,487 

R7(M2-166CN 

Contact: American Institute 

of Architects Research 

Corporation, 1735 New 

York Avenue, N.W., 

Washington, DC 20006 



To provide mid-career fellowships in de- 
sign. The academy's fellowship program 
provides diversity and innovation in the 
design fields and has influenced the pro- 
grams of other artistic disciplines at the 
academy. 



For the academy's mid-career designers' 
fellowship program. 



For the academy's mid-career fellowships 
in design. Amendment number 32-4215- 
00024.9 was made in 1984. 



To support the academy's fellowship pro- 
gram. The program gives designers in 
mid-career an opportunity to explore new 
ideas and to grow as artists. 



For three six-month fellowships during 
1988 and 1989. Fellowships are designed 
to provide time for recipients to explore 
and synthesize their design ideas during 
a career stage when professional respon- 
sibilities limit independent work. 



To perform research on user-oriented 
post-occupancy evaluations as a tool for 
the assessment of federal office building 
design. 



186 CHAPTER FIVE 



American Institute of 
Architects Foundation 
FY 1985 
$30,000 

NEA DCA 85-32 
Contact: American Institute 
of Architects Foundation, 
1735 Massachusetts 
Avenue, N.W., Washington, 
DC 20006 



Art Center College of 

Design 

FY 1980 

$5,600 

02-4211-181 

Contact: Vice-President, Art 

Center College of Design, 

1 700 Lida Street, Pasadena, 

CA91103 



Auburn University 

FY 1986 

$5,000 

86-4256-0089 

Contact: Vice-President, 

Sponsored Research, 

Auburn University, Main 

Campus, 202 Samford Hall 

Auburn University, AL 

36849 



Bacon, Edmund N. 

FY 1987 

$20,000 

87-4214-0041 

Contact: 21 17 Locust 

Street, Philadelphia, PA 

19103 



Bakanowsky, Louis J. 
FY 1983 
$15,000 
31-4214-00163 
Contact: 6 Parker Street, 
Lexington, MA 02173 



To conduct a feasibility study and to 
generate recommendations on a U.S.A. 
Design Fellowship Program to be estab- 
lished in conjunction with the Design 
Arts Program. 



Billington, David P 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

91-4232-098 

Contact: 23 University 

Place, Princeton, NJ 08540 



To support the Art Center College of 
Design's student fellowship program. 
Grants were awarded to seven students. 



To create an annual honors environmen- 
tal design workshop for high school stu- 
dents in a five-state area. 



For a distinguished design fellowship. 
Edmund Bacon, architect and urban de- 
signer, is vice-president of Mondev Inter- 
national, Ltd., an adjunct professor at 
the University of Pennsylvania, the au- 
thor of Design of Cities and producer of 
five films on the history of city building. 



For a sabbatical fellowship. Grantee 
documented 1 37 architectural and urban 
design projects that display relational 
field characteristics: the total integration 
of buildings and the surrounding spaces. 
Five volumes compiling and describing 
the projects were completed. 



For research on the aesthetics of large- 
scale public structures in the United 
States. This research resulted in a re- 
vised publication of lecture notes, 
"Structures and the Urban Environ- 
ment," and other papers that emphasized 
the role of education and educators in fu- 
ture improvement in the design of large- 
scale works. 



Blair, Katherine 

FY 1980 

$7,500 

01-4214-022 

Contact: 2108 Foresthill 

Road, Alexandria, VA 

22307 



Blessing, Charles A. 

FY 1980 

$7,500 

01-4215-156 

Contact: 2532 Seminole 

Avenue, Detroit, MI 48214 



Boston Architectural Center 

FY 1982 

$8,000 

22-4211-110 

Contact: President, Boston 

Architectural Center, 320 

Newbury Center, Boston, 

MA 02115 



Broderick, Mosette G. 

FY 1986 

$10,000 

86-4213-0103 

Contact: 530 West End 

Avenue, New York, NY 

10024 



Buffalo Organization for 

Social and Technological 

Innovation (BOSTI) 

FY 1982 

$101,090 

DCA 82-25 

Contact: Director of 

Research, BOSTI, 1479 

Hertel Avenue, Buffalo, NY 

14216 



California State Polytechnic 

University 

FY 1980 

$4,000 

02-4211-182 

Contact: Chairman, 

California State Polytechnic 

University, Pomona, CA 

91768 



California Tomorrow 

FY 1978 

$100,000 

R80-42-91 

Contact: Coordinator, 

California Tomorrow, 681 

Market Street, Room 1059, 

San Francisco, CA 94105 



For a senior-level sabbatical fellowship. 
These were intended to allow grantees to 
pursue independent study in their fields. 



For a senior-level sabbatical fellowship. 
These were intended to allow grantees to 
pursue independent study in their fields. 



For the thesis program at the Boston 
Architectural Center. As part of the 
B.A. requirements, students explore an 
architecture project and are responsible 
for research, conception, management 
and execution of the thesis work. 



To study the early work of the American 
architectural firm of McKim, Mead & 
White, from the late 1870s to the 1890s. 
The focus was on two major design 
styles: the shingle style and the in-town 
urban classic. 



To explore, document and provide recog- 
nition for design theory as a basis for de- 
sign excellence in America. The project 
included an awards program in the area 
of design research. An amendment, grant 
number NEA DCA 82-25.2, was made 
in 1984 to allow extra time for produc- 
tion of a design theory publication. 



To support California State Polytechnic 
University's design student fellowship 
program. 



For an environmental internship program 
based on the successful regional model 
developed by the Massachusetts Audu- 
bon Society. The program offers short- 
term technical assistance on the natural 
and built environment to private and 
public agencies and provides students 
with valuable field experience. A total of 
1 50 intern projects took place. 



DESIGN EDUCATION AND PROFESSIONAL ADVANCEMENT 187 



Camerio, Mary C. 

FY 1986 

$10,000 

86-4213-0114 

Contact: Department of 

Architecture, University of 

California, Berkeley, 

Berkeley, CA 94720 



Catholic University of 

America 

FY 1981 

$2,400 

12-4211-123 

Contact: Chairman, 

Department of Architecture, 

The Catholic University of 

America, Washington, DC 

20064 



Clausen, Meredith L. 

FY 1977 

$9,400 

R71-42-41N 

Contact: 1 832 Virginia 

Street, Berkeley, CA 94703 



Consanti Foundation 
FY 1981 
$9,450 
12-4221-140 
Contact: Coordinator, 
Workshop Program, 
Consanti Foundation, 6433 
Doubletree Road, 
Scottsdale, AZ 85253 



Cornell University 

FY 1980 

$5,600 

02-4211-184 

Contact: Associate Dean, 

Cornell University, 132 Day 

Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 



Cornell University 

FY 1982 

$5,000 

22-4211-111 

Contact: Professor of 

Architecture, Cornell 

University, College of 

Architecture, Art and 

Planning, Department of 

Architecture, Ithaca, NY 

14853 



To write a work tracing the historical 
roots of place-making and examining 
nineteenth- and early twentieth-century 
examples of projects and places whose 
physical forms were influenced by social 
vision. 



To enable twenty students in the depart- 
ment of architecture to study design pos- 
sibilities for a suburban Washington 
community undergoing rapid change. 



For a study of beaux arts design con- 
cepts. The study focused on the Univer- 
sity of California-Berkeley campus where 
many important principles of beaux arts 
planning were first applied. An accompa- 
nying report suggests how elements ob- 
scured over time may be redefined and 
proposes a new plan for the Central 
Mall. 



For a fellowship program to allow out- 
standing design students to participate in 
the workshops presented at Arcosanti, a 
prototype new town under construction 
in Arizona. 



For Cornell University's design student 
fellowship program. 



For Cornell University's design fellow- 
ship program. Twelve grants were 
awarded to graduate and undergraduate 
students in architecture and planning. 



Cranbrook Academy of Art 
FY 1981 
$3,360 
12-4211-232 
Contact: Cochairman, 
Design Department, 
Cranbrook Academy of Art, 
500 Lone Pine Road, PO. 
Box 801, Bloomfield Hills, 
Ml 48013 



Crane, David A. 

FY 1985 

$10,000 

51-4213-0059 

Contact: 149 Dedham 

Street, Dover, MA 02030 



Damora, Robert 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R81-42-1N 

Contact: Round Ridge 

Road, Bedford, NY 10506 



Danziger, Louis 

FY 1985 

$20,000 

51-4213-0134 

Contact: 7001 Melrose 

Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 

90038 



Department of Culture, 

Recreation and Tourism 

FY 1987 

$25,000 

87-4218-0129 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Department of Culture, 

Recreation and Tourism, 

Division of the Arts, RO. 

Box 44247, Baton Rouge, 

LA 70804 



Doxtater, Dennis C. 

FY 1983 

$10,000 

31-4213-00145 

Contact: Assistant Professor, 

University of Arizona. 

College of Architecture, 

Tuscon,AZ 85721 



Freudenheim, Leslie 

FY 1978 

$9,400 

R81-42-2N 

Contact: 2 1 8 Wendover 

Road, Baltimore, MD 21218 



To support graduate student projects and 
theses at Cranbrook Academy of Art. 
The areas of study included industrial, 
furniture, interior graphics and exhibit 
design as well as architecture and fabric 
design. 



To study current ideas and potential di- 
rections of urban design theory, educa- 
tion and practice. Research was con- 
ducted by means of a literature review 
and professional peer group interviews. 
Slides and descriptive material 
documented the project. 



For a professional fellowship in design 
for independent research. 



For a distinguished designer sabbatical 
fellowship. Louis Danziger is a practicing 
designer, director of the graphic design 
program at the California Institute of 
Technology and a teacher and lecturer at 
the Art Center College of Design in Los 
Angeles and at Yale University. 



To support design arts fellowships for 
Louisiana architects, designers and visual 
artists working in architectural settings. 
A panel selected the fellows, giving spe- 
cial consideration to projects that treat 
traditional Louisiana and southern re- 
gional architectural design elements in 
innovative ways. 



To investigate the role of formal design 
processes in emerging societies, using the 
Anasazi pueblo in the Southwest as a 
case study. Two reports resulted from 
the study. 



For an apprenticeship in several architec- 
tural firms and city housing development 
agencies in order to enhance grantee's 
profession as a writer on architectural 
and urban affairs. 



188 CHAPTER FIVE 



Gelberg, Murray 

FY 1979 

$9,500 

91-4232-233 

Contact: Pound Ridge 

Road, Bedford Village, NY 

10S06 



Georgia Institute of 

Technology 

FY 1980 

$4,000 

02^211-186 

Contact: Georgia Institute 

of Technology, Atlanta, GA 

30332 



Harms, Martin J. 

FY 1985 

$10,000 

51-4213-0061 

Contact: 617 Pine Street, 

Philadelphia, PA 19106 



To prepare a booklet on a collapsible 
construction system invented for truss- 
like support structures. 



Harrington, Jonathan 

Brooke 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

91-4231-093 

Contact: 7417 Boyer Street, 

Philadelphia, PA 19119 



Harvard University 
FY 1979 
$13,000 
92-4212-156 
Contact: President and 
Fellows of Harvard 
University, George Gund 
Hall, 48 Quincy Street, 
Cambridge, MA 02138 



Harvard University 

FY 1980 

$4,000 

02-4211-187 

Contact: Director, Harvard 

University, Urban Design 

Program, 1350 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

Cambridge, MA 02138 



Harvard University 

FY 1980 

$20,000 

02-4214-024 

Contact: Curator, Loeb 

Fellowships, Harvard 

University, Holyoke Center, 

Room 458, 1350 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

Cambridge, MA 02138 



For Georgia Institute of Technology's de- 
sign student fellowship program. 



To conduct a design evaluation and inter- 
pretation of three public institutional 
buildings built in Philadelphia at 100- 
year intervals beginning in 1770. The 
purpose was to show the relationship be- 
tween architectural design and advances 
in technology. 



To study how fragments or elements of 
architectural spaces contribute to the 
overall composition of the spaces. The re- 
search and resulting report focused on 
extant works of great European archi- 
tects. 



To support Career Discovery, an annual 
summer program introducing environ- 
mental design and planning to students. 
The program was initiated by the Har- 
vard Graduate School of Design in 1973. 



For Harvard University's student fellow- 
ship program in urban design. 



For the Loeb Fellowship Program. The 
program provides mid- to senior-career 
design professionals in private and public 
sectors with a semester or year of inde- 
pendent studies. 



Harvard University 

FY 1981 

$25,000 

12-4221-145 

Contact: Dean, Harvard 

School of Design, Harvard 

University, 1350 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

Cambridge, MA 02138 



Harvard College 

FY 1984 

$25,000 

42-4215-00008 

Contact: Professor, Harvard 

University, Graduate School 

of Design, 509 Gund Hall, 

Cambridge, MA 02138 



Harvard College 

FY 1985 

$25,000 

52-4213-0136 

Contact: Associate Director, 

President and Fellows of 

Harvard College, Office for 

Sponsored Research, 

Cambridge, MA 02138 



Harvard College 

FY 1986 

$25,000 

86-4213-0108 

Contact: Director, Awards 

Management, Holyoke 

Center, Fourth Floor, 1350 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

Cambridge, MA 02138 



Harvard College 

FY 1987 

$25,000 

87-4218-0154 

Contact: Associate Dean for 

Administration, President 

and Fellows of Harvard 

College, Holyoke Center, 

Fourth Floor, 1350 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

Cambridge, MA 02138 



Hondorp, Rick D. 

FY 1979 

$4,000 

91-4231-087 

Contact: 903 South Farmers 

Avenue, No. 3, Tempe, AZ 

85281 



For the Loeb Fellowship Program for 
mid- to senior-level designers to enable 
grantees to pursue independent study. 



For the Loeb Fellowship Program, which 
provides mid-career design professionals 
with the opportunity to improve their 
professional work through independent 
study. 



To support the Loeb Fellowship Program 
for mid-career design professionals. En- 
dowment funding has encouraged the 
program to seek out women, minorities 
and disabled persons. 



For the Loeb Fellowship Program for 
mid- to senior-level designers to enable 
grantees to pursue independent study. 



To support up to five Loeb Fellowships 
for the academic year 1987-88 for mid- 
career design and planning professionals 
from the private and public sectors. 



For an entering professional fellowship in 
design. 



DESIGN EDUCATION AND PROFESSIONAL ADVANCEMENT 189 



Horton, Thomas E. 

FY 1986 

$9,650 

86-4213-0113 

Contact: 1048 Union Street, 

Apt. 10, San Francisco, CA 

94133 



Institute for the 

Development of Evolutive 

Architecture 

FY 1982 

$9,000 

22-4252-160 

Contact: President, Institute 

for the Development of 

Evolutive Architecture, 329 

Westcott Street, Syracuse, 

NY 13210 



Institute for the 

Development of Evolutive 

Architecture 

FY 1983 

$15,000 

32-4252-00056 

Contact: Institute for the 

Development of Evolutive 

Architecture, 329 Westcott 

Street, Syracuse, NY 13210 



Kania, Michael R. 

FY 1986 

$4,300 

86-4213-0102 

Contact: Box 1556, RC 63, 

Challis, ID 83226 



Knight, Carleton, III 
FY 1983 
$10,000 
31-4213-00153 
Contact: 27 1 1 Ordway 
Street, N.W., No. 308, 
Washington, DC 20008 



Krauss, Richard I. 

FY 1980 

$7,500 

01-4214-025 

Contact: 64 Armory Street, 

Brookline, MA 02146 



Kutnicki, Lawrence 

FY 1979 

$5,000 

91-4231-088 

Contact: 341/2 St. Mark's 

Place. New York, NY 

10003 



To Study the evolution and application of 
environmental graphics in France and 
their impact on public spaces in that 
country. Slides and interpretive material 
documented the project. This was the 
first grant under the pilot program of 
United States/France Exchange Fellow- 
ships. 



To investigate the decison-making pro- 
cess used by designers as a method of in- 
quiry that parallels and complements the 
process used in scientific research. 



To create a model that shows how design 
as a method used by researchers to syn- 
thesize information complements scien- 
tific methods and analysis. 



To study the design of new towns in the 
arctic and subarctic, especially those 
towns that have sprung up as a result of 
the Alaskan pipeline. The research was 
documented in slides. 



To identify the characteristics of a suc- 
cessful architect/client collaboration 
through interviews with both architects 
and design clients. The aims were to 
broaden public awareness and to estab- 
lish guidelines for productive architect- 
client dialogue. 



For a design fellowship. 



For a professional fellowship in design. 



Lam, William M. 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

91-4231-200 

Contact: 101 Foster Street, 

Cambridge, MA 02138 



Marquis, Robert B. 

FY 1980 

$7,500 

01-4215-157 

Contact: 243 Vallejo Street, 

San Francisco, CA 941 11 



Maryland Institute College 

of Art 

FY 1980 

$5,600 

02-4211-190 

Contact: The Maryland 

Institute College of Art, 

1 300 West Mount Royal 

Avenue, Baltimore, MD 

21217 



Massachusetts College of 

Art 

FY 1980 

$4,000 

02-4211-191 

Contact: Chairman, 

Massachusetts College of 

Art, 364 Brookline Avenue, 

Boston, MA 02215 



Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology 

FY 1979 

$14,283 

92-4235-266 

Contact: Department of 

Architecture, Massachusetts 

Institute of Technology, 77 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

Cambridge, MA 02139 



Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology 
FY 1983 
$38,480 
32-4252-00057 
Contact: Dean of 
Architecture and Planning, 
Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, 77 
Massachusetts Avenue, 
Cambridge, MA 02139 



For an accomplished professional fellow- 
ship in design. An audiovisual presenta- 
tion entitled "Concept Not Hardware" 
was produced. 



For a senior level sabbatical fellowship. 
An exhibit entitled Marquis and Asso- 
ciates, 1953-1981, was designed and 
shown at the schools of architecture of 
the University of Virginia and University 
of Utah. 



For the Maryland Institute College of 
Art's design student fellowship program. 



For the Massachusetts College of Art's 
design student fellowship program. 



To provide incentive awards to students 
of design and architecture doing thesis 
work at the master's level. 



For a series of design studies on the pro- 
cess that occurs while designers are actu- 
ally drawing and developing projects. 
This on-the-spot research is largely ig- 
nored but significantly affects the final 
form of a project. Numerous disciplines 
were drawn from in the final report. 



190 CHAPTER FIVE 



Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology 

FY 1987 

$25,000 

87^251-0169 

Conlaci: Office of 

Sponsored Programs, 

Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology, 77 

Massachusets Avenue, 

Cambridge, MA 02139 



Migdoll, Herbert 

FY 1980 

$7,500 

01-4215-158 

Contact: 1 59 West 76th 

Street, New York, NY 

10023 



Moore, E. Fuller 

FY 1980 

$7,500 

01-4215-159 

Contact: Miami University, 

Oxford, OH 45056 



Moss, Charles W. 

FY 1986 

$20,000 

86-4213-0126 

Contact: Moss, Inc., PO. 

Box 309, Camden, ME 

04843 



Moudon, Anne Vernez 

FY 1986 

$9,850 

86-4213-0119 

Comacr; 410 Gould Hall, 

University of Washington, 

Seattle. WA 98195 



Mouton, Grover E., Ill 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

91-4231-206 

Contact: 543 St. Ann 

Street, New Orleans, LA 

70116 



Murphy, Daniel B. 

FY 1979 

$5,000 

91-4231-172 

Contact: 54 Halsey Street, 

No. 7, Providence, RI 

02906 



To develop a flexible notation system 
that analyzes the processes of designing. 
The aim was to perform fundamental re- 
search to determine how the design pro- 
cess works. 



For a senior-level sabbatical fellowship. 



For a senior-level sabbatical fellowship. 
The effects of energy use on architec- 
tural form in six libraries designed by ar- 
chitect Alvar Aalto were examined. 



For a distinguished design fellowship. 
Charles Moss is an industrial designer 
and illustrator who since 1958 has oper- 
ated his own design consulting firm. His 
work is included in the collections of the 
Louvre, the Museum of Modern Art and 
the Smithsonian Institution. 



To document and critique three recent 
European studies on urban analysis and 
planning. The research results included a 
bibliography of American and European 
studies of urban form dating from the 
1890s, and a paper on the potential of 
these studies to provide a conceptual 
framework for environmental design re- 
search. 



For an accomplished professional fellow- 
ship in design. 



For an entering professional fellowship in 
design. 



McHarg, Ian L. 

FY 1987 

$20,000 

87-4214-0042 

Contact: 625 Broad Run 

Road, West Chester, PA 

19380 



MacLean, Alexander S. 

FY 1980 

$9,880 

01-4213-173 

Contact: 791 Tremont 

Street, Apt. 406, Boston, 

MA 021 18 



McNulty, Mary Stevens 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R7 1-42-2 IN 

Contact: Box 162, Lincoln, 

MA 01773 



Ohio State University 

Research Foundation 

FY 1980 

$5,600 

02-4211-193 

Contact: Chairman, Ohio 

State University, 

Department of Landscape 

Architecture, Columbus, 

OH 43210 



O'Keefe, Susan 

FY 1978 

$5,953 

R81-42-55CN 

Contact: Architect, 2 

Washington Square Village, 

New York, NY 10012 



Parsons School of Design 
FY 1982 
$6,400 
22-4211-112 
Contact: Chairman, 
Environmental Design, 
Parsons School of Design, 
66 West 1 2th Street, 
Environmental Design 
Department, New York, 
NY 10011 



For a distinguished design fellowship. 
Ian L. McHarg is professor and chair- 
man of the Department of Landscape 
Architecture and Regional Planning at 
the University of Pennsylvania. He was a 
partner in the firm of Wallace, McHarg, 
Roberts and Todd in Philadelphia from 
1960 to 1981. His influential book. De- 
sign with Nature, was published in 1969. 



To investigate the use of oblique-angled 
aerial photography as a tool for survey- 
ing and documenting cities. Such images 
serve as a design resource for evaluating 
the urban environment. 



To continue research on American 
vernacular folk architecture. 



To grant four design fellowships to Ohio 
State University students in landscape 
architecture. 



For research on prominent, older archi- 
tects and other professionals who have 
contributed significantly to architecture. 



For the student fellowship program at 
Parsons School of Design. Grants were J 
awarded to eight students in environmen- \ 
tal design. 



DESIGN EDUCATION AND PROFESSIONAL ADVANCEMENT 191 



Rapoport, Amos 

FY 1982 

$15,000 

21-4215-090 

Coniaci: Professor. 

University of Wisconsin, 

Milwaukee, Department of 

Architecture, Milwaukee, 

Wl 53201 



Rapson, Ralph E. 

FY 1985 

$20,000 

51-4213-0053 

Contact: Ralph Rapson and 

Associates, Inc., 1503 

Washington Avenue South, 

Minneapolis, MN 55454 



Regents of the University of 

Michigan 

FY 1986 

$24,996 

NEA DC A 86-40 

Contact: University of 

Michigan, 245 West 

Engineering, Ann Arbor, 

Ml 48109 



Research Foundation of the 

State University of New 

York 

FY 1983 

$10,000 

32^252-00131 

Contact: Research 

Foundation of the State 

University of New York, 

PO. Box 9. Albany, NY 

12201 



Research Foundation of the 
State University of New 
York 
FY 1981 
$6,000 
12-4211-128 
Contact: Research 
Foundation of the State 
University of New York, 
School of Landscape 
Architecture, PO. Box 9, 
Albany, NY 12201 



Research Foundation of the 

State University of New 

York 

FY 1985 

$25,000 

52-4252-0071 

Contact: Associate Director, 

Research Foundation of the 

State University of New 

York, PO. Box 9, Albany, 

NY 12201 



To develop environmental behavior re- 
search, a new theory of design. The re- 
search focused on people in environments 
and learning from diverse cultures and 
vernacular design. 



For a distinguished designer sabbatical 
fellowship. 



To conduct a feasibility study to deter- 
mine the usefulness of design promotion 
programs as an impact on market deci- 



For an archival guide to records in the 
Upstate Robert Moses-Triborough 
Bridge and Tunnel Authority research 
collection and a traveling photo exhibit 
of previously unpublished pictures of the 
construction of the Verrazano Narrows 
Bridge. A report, Robert Moses and 
Public Works, was issued. 



To support the State University of New 
York's design student fellowship pro- 
gram, allowing the university to award 
seven grants. 



For research on the classifications of 
building types used in the design, devel- 
opment, regulation and management of 
buildings. The aim was to identify the 
characteristics that generate classifica- 
tions of building types and the variables 
that influence their evolution. 



Rhode Island School of 

Design 

FY 1981 

$8,000 

12-4211-129 

Contact: Dean, School of 

Architecture, Rhode Island 

School of Design, 2 College 

Street, Providence, RI 

02903 



Riley. Terence 

FY 1987 

$6,400 

87^216-0142 

Contact: Kenneth-Riley 

Architects, 142 West 14th 

Street, New York, NY 

10011 



Roos, Gabrielle 

FY 1980 

$10,000 

01-4213-177 

Contact: 38 West 26th 

Street, New York, NY 

10010 



Roth, Marcy G. 

FY 1979 

$5,000 

91-4231-089 

Contact: 314 West 105th 

Street, Apt. 2C, New York, 

NY 10025 



Sanders, Donald M. 
FY 1982 
$9,700 
21-4213-184 
Contact: Research 
Assistant, Columbia 
University, Department of 
Architecture and Planning, 
300 West 109th Street, 
New York, NY 10025 



Schlesinger, B. Frank 

FY 1984 

$15,000 

41-4213-0120 

Contact: Til 17th Street, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20006 



For the Rhode Island School of Design's 
student fellowship program. Student 
projects in the areas of architecture, 
landscape architecture, interior architec- 
ture and industrial design were funded. 



For a study on the work of Paul Nelson, 
an early modern architect whose func- 
tionalist theories and design methodology 
were influential in the early twentieth 
century. An archival listing of sources 
was produced. 



To provide the grantee with an opportu- 
nity to work in direct collaboration with 
architects in her field as a color consul- 
tant. A report. Architectural Color, was 
produced. 



For an entering professional fellowship in 
design. 



To devise a new method of analyzing an- 
cient architecture in an elTort to under- 
stand how specific buildings were used 
and how they functioned. The aim was to 
derive a functional interpretation of his- 
toric places. 



To study the architecture of Scandina- 
via, including the works of Jacobsen. 
Urzon, Erskine, Ervi, Siren, Revell, 
Pietila and Aalto, as well as of lesser 
known architects of Denmark, Sweden 
and Finland. 



192 CHAPTER FIVE 



Sculpture in the 
Environment, Inc. (SITE) 
FY 1983 
$30,000 
32-4213-00159 
Contact: President, 
Sculpture in the 
Environment, Inc. (SITE), 
83 Spring Street, New 
York. NY 10012 



Shibley, Robert G. 

FY 1983 

$5,000 

31-4213-00017 

Contact: Visiting Professor 

of Architecture, Virginia 

Polytechnic Institute, 203 

Monticello Lane, 

Blacksburg, VA 24060 



Slayton, William L. 

FY 1984 

$10,000 

41-4213-0149 

Contact: 34 1 1 Ordway 

Street, N.W., Washington, 

DC 20016 



Smith, Jennifer 

FY 1979 

$5,000 

91-4231-208 

Contact: 821 Ninth Avenue, 

New York, NY 10019 



Sorkin, Michael D. 

FY 1987 

$10,000 

87^216-0137 

Contact: 1 1 7 Waverly 

Place, No. 5W, New York, 

NY 10011 



Spreiregen, Paul D. 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

91-4231-209 

Contact: 215 Observatory 

Place, N.W., Washington, 

DC 20007 



Strickland, Roy J. 

FY 1979 

$5,000 

91-4231-090 

Contact: 15 Warnick Road, 

Brookline, MA 02146 



To establish the Visiting Fellows Pro- 
gram. The program allowed three mid- 
career designers, artists, scholars or ar- 
chitects to work with resident artists and 
designers at SITE on innovative research 
projects. 



To research design guides and to identify 
criteria for assessing their quality. A 
technical report was produced on their 
effectiveness. 



For a study of architect-selection proce- 
dures that have resulted in particularly 
good architecture. Two reports. So You 
Want to Build a Building and A Client 's 
Guide to Design Process and Architect 
Selection, were issued. 



For an entering professional fellowship in 
costume and fashion design. 



To support a Utopian study exploring the 
effect that a series of 1 ,000 descriptive 
statutes could have on a city's physical 
form. The aim was to contribute to a re- 
evaluation of urban form and of the reg- 
ulatory controls, design guidelines and 
the economic and social relationships 
that shape American cities. 



For an accomplished professional fellow- 
ship in design. 



For an entering professional fellowship in 
design. A 1 59-page manuscript, At 
Home in the City, was produced. 



Trustees of Columbia 

University 

FY 1981 

$7,000 

12-4211-124 

Contact: Dean, School of 

Architecture and Planning, 

Columbia University, 402 

Avery, New York, NY 

10027 



Trustees of the University of 

Pennsylvania 

FY 1978 

$30,000 

R80-42-131 

Contact: Chairman, 

Trustees of the University of 

Pennsylvania, Architecture 

Department, University of 

Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, 

PA 19104 



Trustees of the University of 

Pennsylvania 

FY 1980 

$5,600 

02-4211-195 

Contact: Dean, University 

of Pennsylvania, 

Philadelphia, PA 19104 



Tulane University of 

Louisiana 

FY 1980 

$4,000 

02-4211-196 

Contact: Dean, Tulane 

University, School of 

Architecture, New Orleans, 

LA 70118 



United States Committee of 

the International Council on 

Monuments and Sites (US/ 

ICOMOS) 

FY 1981 

$2,500 

12^221-237 

Contact: Administrative 

Assistant, US/ICOMOS, 

1785 Massachusetts 

Avenue, N.W., Washington, 

DC 20036 



University of Arkansas 

FY 1981 

$8,000 

12-4211-122 

Contact: Design Program 

Coordinator, University of 

Arkansas, Fayelteville, AR 

72701 



For Columbia University's design stu- 
dent fellowship program. Twenty-four 
students developed thesis-level presenta- 
tions drawing from the school's four ma- 
jor programs — architecture, urban de- 
sign, urban planning and historic 
preservation. 



To perform research in architecture fo- 
cusing on the interrelationships among 
architectural character, building technol- 
ogy and human values. 



For the University of Pennsylvania's de- 
sign student fellowship program. 



For Tulane University's design student 
fellowship program. 



To award five fellowships to allow Amer- 
icans designers to participate in formal 
or independent foreign study programs 
related to historic preservation. 



For the University of Arkansas's design 
student fellowship program. 



DESIGN EDUCATION AND PROFESSIONAL ADVANCEMENT 193 



University of Cincinnati 
FY 1980 
$4,000 
02-4211-183 
Contact: Chairman, 
University of Cincinnati, 
Department of Industrial 
Design, Cincinnati, OH 
45221 



University of Georgia 

FY 1980 

SI. 600 

02-4211-185 

Contact: Dean, University 

of Georgia, School of 

Environmental Design, 

Athens, GA 30602 



University of Idaho 

FY 1981 

$5,000 

12-4211-126 

Contact: Associate Professor 

of Architecture, University 

of Idaho, Architecture 

Department, Moscow, ID 

83843 



University of Illinois at 

Chicago Circle 

FY 1980 

$3,200 

02-4211-188 

Contact: Director, 

University of Illinois at 

Chicago Circle, Chicago, IL 

60680 



University of Illinois at 

Chicago Circle 

FY 1981 

$8,000 

12-4211-233 

Contact: Director, School of 

Art and Design, University 

of Illinois at Chicago Circle, 

Box 4348, Chicago, IL 

60680 



University of Massachusetts 

FY 1981 

$4,800 

12-4211-127 

Contact: Director, Graduate 

Design Program, University 

of Massachusetts, 361 Fine 

Arts Center, Amherst, MA 

01003 



For the University of Cincinnati's indus- 
trial design student fellowship program, 
which awarded grants to eight under- 
graduate students. 



For the design student fellowship pro- 
gram at the University of Georgia 
School of Environmental Design. 



For the University of Idaho's design stu- 
dent fellowhip program which enabled 
eight architectural students to complete 
thesis work. 



For nine design student fellowships at 
the University of Illinois, Chicago Cam- 
pus. 



For the design student fellowship pro- 
gram. The fellowships provided students 
with an opportunity to investigate new 
and traditional materials and techniques. 



For the University of Massachusetts's de- 
sign student fellowship program. 



University of Minnesota 

FY 1980 

$5,600 

02-4211-192 

Contact: Head, University 

of Minnesota, School of 

Architecture, Minneapolis, 

MN 55455 



University of Tennessee 

FY 1978 

$15,000 

R80-42-32 

Contact: Associate 

Professor, University of 

Tennessee, School of 

Architecture, Knoxville, TN 

37916 



University of Tennessee 

FY 1982 

$4,000 

22-4211-113 

Contact: Director, Graduate 

School of Planning, 

University of Tennessee, 

404 Andy Holt Tower, 

Knoxville, TN 37916 



University of Washington 

FY 1980 

$5,600 

02-4211-197 

Contact: Chairman, 

University of Washington, 

Department of 

Architecture, Seattle, WA 

98195 



University of Wisconsin, 

Milwaukee 

FY 1980 

$5,600 

02-4211-198 

Contact: Chairman, 

University of Wisconsin, 

Milwaukee, PO. Box 413, 

Department of Architecture, 

Milwaukee, Wl 53201 



University of Wisconsin, 

Milwaukee 

FY 1983 

$13,592 

32-4252-00060 

Contact: Associate 

Professor, University of 

Wisconsin, Milwaukee, 

Department of Architecture, 

PO. Box 413, Milwaukee, 

Wl 53201 



For the University of Minnesota's design 
student fellowship program in architec- 
ture. 



To conduct research to determine how to 
use models effectively in the design pro- 
cess and how to involve users and 
nondesigners in planning. 



To award five design fellowships to sup- 
port community planning and design 
work. 



For the University of Washington's de- 
sign student fellowship program in land- 
scape architecture. Projects ranged from 
a study of the Wittgenstein House to the 
design of a shopping mall and its land- 
scape elements. 



To fund four student projects that en- 
tailed working with a community in 
developing a new medical complex. 



To compare two competing theories in 
the psychology of perception, the gestalt 
and the ecological, as they apply to vi- 
sual perception in architectural terms. A 
report on the findings was produced. 



194 CHAPTER FIVE 



University of Wisconsin, 

Milwaukee 

FY 1985 

$25,120 

52-4252-0132 

Contact: Associate Dean, 

University of Wisconsin, 

Milwaukee, PO. Box 340, 

Milwaukee, Wl 53201 



University of Oregon 

FY 1980 

$5,600 

02-4211-194 

Contact: Dean, University 

of Oregon, Graduate 

School, Eugene, OR 97403 



Urban Innovations Group 

FY 1983 

$9,830 

32^252-00059 

Contact: Project Director, 

Urban Innovations Group, 

1063 Galey Avenue, Los 

Angeles, CA 90024 



Varian, Elyane H. 

FY 1977 

$5,000 

R71-42-36N 

Contact: 1310 Lake Shore 

Drive, Orlando, FL 32803 



Wines, James 

FY 1983 

$15,000 

3 M2 15-00022 

Contact: President, 

Sculpture in the 

Environment (SITE), Inc., 

83 Spring Street, New 

York, NY 10012 



To explore the design of architectural 
settings used in motion pictures. The 
architectural settings used in films are 
intended to heighten emotion and create 
visual effects. The values and concepts 
filmmakers express promise insights for 
actual architectural works. A report 
based on interviews with film designers 
and architects was issued. 



For fifteen student fellowship projects on 
design and environmental problems. 



To develop graphic diagrams illustrating 
design concepts described by architects 
in their own writings. The aim was to dis- 
cover how and why individuals and 
schools resemble or differ from each 
other. 



For research in the field of design com- 
mentary and criticism, with special em- 
phasis on contemporary activities and the 
art deco period in America. 



For a senior-level design fellowship. 



Films and Exhibits 



American Academy in 

Rome 

FY 1984 

$30,000 

42-4256-0038 

Contact: President, 

American Academy in 

Rome, 41 East 65th Street, 

New York, NY 10021 



American Institute of 

Architects Foundation 

FY 1980 

$15,157 

02-4250-219 

Contact: American Institute 

of Architects Foundation, 

1735 New York Avenue, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20006 



American Institute of 
Architects Foundation 
FY 1979 
$21,000 
92-4212-008 
Contact: President, 
American Institute of 
Architects Foundation, 1735 
New York Avenue, N.W., 
Washington, DC 20006 



American Institute of 

Architects Foundation 

FY 1979 

$21,000 

92-4212-036 

Contact: American Institute 

of Architects Foundation, 

1735 New York Avenue, 

N.W, Washington, DC 

20006 



American Institute of 

Architects Foundation 

FY 1986 

$17,300 

86^256-0021 

Contact: Vice-President, 

American Institute of 

Architects Foundation, 1735 

New York Avenue, N.W., 

Washington, DC 20006 



To produce a traveling exhibition and 
catalogue of drawings produced by the 
academy's architecture and landscape ar- 
chitecture fellows. In many cases, design- 
ers' styles and techniques were dramati- 
cally influenced by their Rome 
fellowships. 



To support the Golden Conway exhibit. 



To amend grant 92-4212-008 to support 
preparation of photographic material on 
Capital Losses, a project on lost architec- 
tural treasures. A $2,000 amendment, 
grant number 92-4212-008.1, was made 
in 1979. 



To produce and distribute a film detail- 
ing how the application of simple, proven 
urban design principles improves accessi- 
bility of urban central business districts. 



For research and planning for an exhibit 
celebrating a century of achievement by 
American women architects. 



DESIGN EDUCATION AND PROFESSIONAL ADVANCEMENT 195 



American Institute of 

Graphic Arts 

FY 1978 

$7,500 

R80-42-83 

Contact: American Institute 

of Graphic Arts, 1059 Third 

Avenue, New York, NY 

10021 



American-Scandinavian 
Foundation 
FY 1982 
$30,000 
22-4250-014 

Contact: National Project 
Director, Scandinavia 
Today, American- 
Scandinavian Foundation, 
127 East 73rd Street. New 
York, NY 10021 



Architectural Foundation of 

Nebraska 

FY 1986 

$15,000 

86-4256-0033 

Contact: Chairman, 

Architectural Foundation of 

Nebraska, 1910 South 44th 

Street, Suite 100, Omaha, 

NE 68105 



Architectural League of 

New York 

FY 1979 

$15,000 

92-4212-035 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Architectural League of 

New York, 41 East 65th 

Street, New York, NY 

10021 



Architectural League of 

New York 

FY 1984 

$50,000 

42-4255-0040 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Architectural League of 

New York, 457 Madison 

Avenue, New York, NY 

10022 



Architectural League of 

New York 

FY 1985 

$35,000 

52-4256-0111 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Architectural League of 

New York, 457 Madison 

Avenue, New York, NY 

10022 



For a touring exhibition. The Federal 
Design Response, organized in coopera- 
tion with the Federal Design Council. 
The aim was to show the quality and di- 
versity of design solutions recently devel- 
oped for the federal government. A cata- 
logue accompanied the exhibit. 



To an exhibition catalogue, Scandinavian 
Modern Design. 1880-1980. The exhi- 
bition and catalogue featured the design 
contributions of the five Nordic countries 
and explored contemporary design issues. 
The catalogue was published in 1982 by 
Harry N. Abrams, Inc., and was edited 
by David Revere McFadden. 



For a film about Linus Burr Smith, an 
influential teacher of architecture at the 
University of Nebraska. The aim was to 
show his philosophies of design and 
teaching through footage of Smith and 
interviews with fellow architects and fac- 
ulty members. 



For a catalogue of an exhibition of archi- 
tectural photography from its beginning 
in 1840 to the present. The catalogue is 
entitled Architecture Transformed. 



For a lecture series and exhibit entitled 
Architectural Inquiries. The series con- 
sidered architecture from the viewpoints 
of practice, theory and criticism and was 
aimed at informing the professional and 
lay public about architecture. 



For an exhibition and catalogue of Hugh 
Ferriss's drawings of urban architecture 
from the 1920s to 1950s. The exhibit, en- 
titled Hugh Ferriss: Metropolis, showed 
how Ferris's drawings influenced contem- 
porary theory and practice. It opened at 
the Whitney Museum of Art, and trav- 
eled to five other museums in the United 
States and Europe. 



Art Directors Club of 

Boston 

FY 1982 

$5,000 

22-4250-043 

Contact: Board of Directors, 

Art Directors Club of 

Boston, 1 36 Boylston Street, 

Boston, MA 021 16 



Beck, Gregory J. 

FY 1987 

$10,000 

87-4216-0055 

Contact: 10 Garden Court 

Street, Apt. 7, Boston, MA 

02113 



Boutelle, Sara H. 

FY 1977 

$5,000 

R71-42-27N 

Contact: 1 30 Getchell 

Street, Santa Cruz, CA 

95060 



Brolin, Brent C. 

FY 1977 

$8,750 

R71-42-28N 

Contact: 25 Washington 

Square North, New York, 

NY 1001 1 



California Institute of 

Technology/ Baxter Art 

Gallery 

FY 1984 

$20,000 

42-4256-0043 

Contact: Director, Baxter 

Art Gallery, California 

Institute of Technology, 

Pasadena, CA 91 125 



Chicago School of 

Architecture Foundation 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R70-42-29 

Contact: Director, Chicago 

School of Architecture 

Foundation, 1 800 South 

Prairie Avenue, Chicago, IL 

60616 



Comella, Stephanie 

FY 1977 

$14,475 

PC 77-32 

Contact: 5230 Elliott Road, 

Bethesda. MD 20016 



To prepare a planning study for the 
phased development of a new museum of 
design, in Boston, Massachusetts. 



For an exhibition exploring the image of 
the city in science-fiction films. The pur- 
pose was to gain new perspective on the 
forces that influence our built environ- 
ment. 



For an audiovisual presentation on archi- 
tect Julia Morgan. The presentation con- 
sists of eighty-eight slides, a script and a 
recorded background tape. 



For a publication and slide show demon- 
strating how buildings can be skillfully 
designed to enhance an existing environ- 
ment. 



For an exhibition documenting the work 
of California architect Myron Hunt. 
Tours of Hunt's buildings, a lecture and 
panel discussion on Hunt's work took 
place concurrently. The catalogue is enti- 
tled Myron Hunt. 1868-1952: The 
Search for a Regional Architecture. 



For program development at 
ArchiCenter, including a historical exhi- 
bition on Chicago architecture, special 
tours, slide presentations and walking 
tours for children. 



To produce three traveling mini-exhibits 
for the Federal Design Improvement Pro- 
gram. 



196 CHAPTER FIVE 



Cooper Union for the 

Advancement of Science 

and Art 

FY 1979 

$14,150 

92-4212-144 

Contact: Dean, School of 

Architecture, Cooper Union 

for the Advancement of 

Science and Art, Cooper 

Square, New York, NY 

10003 



Cooper Union for the 

Advancement of Science 

and Art 

FV 1985 

$30,000 

52^256-0105 

Contact: President, Cooper 

Union for the Advancement 

of Science and Art, 41 

Cooper Street, New York, 

NY 10003 



Cultural Council 

Foundation 

FY 1982 

$22,662 

22-4250-135 

Contact: Project Director, 

Cultural Council 

Foundation, c/o FACT/ 

USA, 491 Broadway, 11th 

Floor, New York, NY 

10012 



Cultural Council 

Foundation 

FY 1983 

$7,500 

32-4250-00101 

Contact: Director, Program 

Services, Cultural Council 

Foundation, 625 Broadway, 

New York, NY 10012 



Cunningham, Tim 

FY 1981 

$5,000 

1M2 13-087 

Contact: 1316 Sheridan 

Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 

15206 



Drawing Center 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R70-12-62C 

Contact: The Drawing 

Center, 137 Greene Street, 

New York, NY 10012 



To produce an exhibition on the work of 
Richard G. Stein, FAIA, at the 
Houghton Gallery, Cooper Union. A cat- 
alogue entitled Richard G. Stein, Forty 
Years of Architectural Work, accompa- 
nied the exhibit. 



For an exhibition of the drawings of Os- 
car Nitzchke, an architect whose work 
has been in the mainstream of the devel- 
opment of modern architecture. The ex- 
hibit was presented by the Cooper Union 
in October 1985. The catalogue, Oscar 
Nitzchke, Architect, was edited by Gus 
Dudley and published in 1985. 



To organize the Fourth International 
Festival of Films on Architecture and 
Urban Planning. A film competition was 
held, and the 218-page FAC-TV Cata- 
logue: Fourth International Festival of 
Films on Architecture and Planning was 
published in 1984 (Carol! Chesey Mi- 
chels, editor). 



To produce a series of videotape inter- 
views with American architects such as 
Philip Johnson, Robert Venturi, Jaquelin 
Robertson, Hugh Jacobson and Emilio 
Ambasz. The aim was to explore issues 
and ideas in land use and post-modern- 
ism. 



To prepare a slide presentation and 
taped narrative on altruism and humanis- 
tic values as expressed in the work of 
William Morris and Charles Eames. 



To organize an exhibit of drawings by 
twentieth-century architects and plan- 
ners. Ninety of the drawings were toured 
by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling 
Exhibition Service, and the Architectural 
History Foundation funded a 148-page 
catalogue, published by M.I.T. Press. 



Drawing Center 

FY 1987 

$20,000 

87-4251-0036 

Contact: Director of 

Development, The Drawing 

Center, 1 37 Greene Street, 

New York, NY 10012 



Dunlap Society 

FY 1977 

$13,614 

R70-42-167CN 

Contact: President, The 

Dunlap Society, National 

Collection of Fine Arts, 

Smithsonian Institution, 

Room 147, Washington, DC 

20560 



Dunlap Society 

FY 1980 

$20,000 

02^250-115 

Contact: President, The 

Dunlap Society, Lake 

Champlain Road, Essex, 

NY 12936 



Dunlap Society 

FY 1980 

$17,195 

02-4250-080 

Contact: President, The 

Dunlap Society, Lake 

Champlain Road, Essex, 

NY 12936 



Edison Institute 

FY 1985 

$23,123 

52-4231-0087 

Contact: President, Edison 

Institute, RO. Box 1970, 

Dearborn, MI 48121 



Educational Broadcasting 

Corporation 

FY 1983 

$16,610 

32-4250-00103 

Contact: Senior Producer, 

Educational Broadcasting 

Corporation, 356 West 58th 

Street, New York, NY 

10019 



For the exhibit. Master Drawings by 
Otto Wagner, including drawings, furni- 
ture and other works by one of Vienna's 
prominent turn-of-the-century architects. 
Wagner is recognized for his attempts to 
free architecture from dependence on 
historical styles and for his richly de- 
tailed designs. 



For an exhibition on the history of the 
design of public buildings based on ma- 
terials gathered from the National Ar- 
chives, the Library of Congress and the 
Office of the Architect of the Capitol. 



For continued research for an exhibition 
on federal architecture over the last 200 
years and on the problem of designing an 
architectural form expressive of the 
thoughts and values of American democ- 
racy. Work was continued with a grant 
amendment in 1981, number 12-4250- 
9010.1, for $30,000. 



To complete development of a national 
touring exhibition on the history of the 
design of public buildings. 



To design a new center in the Henry 
Ford Museum to house an exhibit based 
on the theme. Understanding Objects 
Through Design. 



For a film portrait of American architect 
Philip Johnson based on interviews be- 
tween the architect and art critic 
Rosamond Bernier. 



DESIGN EDUCATION AND PROFESSIONAL ADVANCEMENT 197 



Film Arts Foundation 

FY 1984 

$30,000 

42-4256-0046 

Contact: Codlrector, Film 

Arts Foundation, 346 Ninth 

Street, 2nd Floor, San 

Francisco, CA 94103 



Florida A&M University 
FY 1980 
$27,814 
02-4250-116 
Contact: Research 
Associate, Florida A&M 
University, School of 
Architecture, PO. Box 597, 
Tallahassee, FL 32307 



Founders Society/ Detroit 

Institute of Arts 

FY 1982 

$30,000 

22-4250-016 

Contact: Curator of Modern 

Art, Detroit Institute of 

Arts, Founders Society, 

5200 Woodward Avenue, 

Detroit, Ml 48202 



Frank Lloyd Wright 

Memorial Foundation 

FY 1985 

$50,000 

52-4256-0036 

Contact: Treasurer, Frank 

Lloyd Wright Memorial 

Foundation, Taliesin West, 

Scottsdale,AZ 85261 



Frank Lloyd Wright 

Memorial Foundation 

FY 1987 

$29,000 

87-4251-0028 

Contact: Chairman of the 

Board, Frank Lloyd Wright 

Memorial Foundation, 

Taliesin West, Scottsdale, 

AZ 85261 



Friends of the Schindler 

House 

FY 1982 

$12,500 

22-4250047 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Friends of the Schindler 

House, 833 North Kings 

Road, Los Angeles, CA 

90069 



To produce a film about Christopher Al- 
exander focusing on this architect's 
twenty-year search to define the intangi- 
ble quality that makes a building, park 
or public street attractive, pleasant and 
enjoyable. 



To study and survey black women in the 
architectural profession. Two goals of the 
study were to expose women and minor- 
ities to the diverse opportunities available 
to them in the field and to describe alter- 
native, nontraditional career options. A 
film was produced. 



To launch an exhibition, cosponsored by 
the Metropolitan Museum in New York, 
on the contributions of the Cranbrook 
Academy of Art to American and Euro- 
pean design. A catalogue, entitled Design 
in America: The Cranbrook Vision, 
1925-1950, accompanied the traveling 
exhibit. 



To restore eighty-nine of Frank Lloyd 
Wright's original drawings. The eighty- 
nine are part of 500 drawings from the 
years 1911 to 1958 that Wright chose as 
being best representative of his work. 
Wright had them mounted for exhi- 
bition, but they subsequently deterio- 
rated. 



To preserve forty-seven of Frank Lloyd 
Wright's original drawings. Final treat- 
ment reports were issued for each of the 
works preserved. 



To adapt one-half of architect Rudolph 
Schindler's home into gallery space suit- 
able for displaying photomurals, 
drawings and architectural models. 



Friends of the Schindler 

House 

FY 1987 

$30,000 

87-4251-0107 

Contact: President, Friends 

of the Schindler House, 835 

North Kings Road, Los 

Angeles, CA 90069 



Grebner, Dennis W. 

FY 1980 

$8,500 

01-4210033 

Contact: 85 Langford Park, 

St. Paul, MN 55108 



Herdeg, Klaus W 

FY 1981 

$10,000 

11-4210-016 

Contact: 303 East 83rd 

Street, Apt. 30C, New 

York, NY 10028 



Hermanuz, Ghislaine 

FY 1982 

$8,250 

21-4213-019 

Contact: Assistant Professor 

of Architecture, Columbia 

University, 195 Claremont 

Avenue, Apt. 45, New 

York, NY 10027 



Industrial Design Society of 

America (IDSA) Walter 

Dorwin Teague Research 

Trust 

FY 1978 

$17,500 

R80-42-191C 

Contact: Executive Director. 

IDSA Walter Dorwin 

Teague Research Trust, 

1717 N Street, N.W., 

Washington, DC 20036 



Institute for Architecture 

and Urban Studies 

FY 1978 

$20,000 

R80-42-88 

Contact: Institute for 

Architecture and Urban 

Studies, 8 West 40th Street. 

New York, NY 10018 



To organize the R. M. Schindler centen- 
nial celebration, including an exhibition, 
publication and educational events focus- 
ing on Schindler's historic studio-resi- 
dence designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. 



To develop an educational film on the 
work of urban designer Gordon Cullen as 
a pilot for a series on urban design. A 
videotape entitled "Townscape" was pro- 
duced. 



To produce a traveling exhibit and publi- 
cation illustrating the traditional public 
and private architecture of the Islamic 
cultures of Iran and Turkestan. A 50- 
page report was produced. 



For a monograph and exhibit on the ar- 
chitecture of black designers, 
documenting and analyzing its architec- 
tural values, concepts and methods. 



To produce a film on Raymond Loewy, 
the industrial designer. 



For a touring lecture series and exhibit 
on architecture and design. 



198 CHAPTER FIVE 



Institute for Architecture 

and Urban Studies 

FY 1979 

$30,000 

92^212-147 

Contact: Director, Public 

Affairs, Institute for 

Architecture and Urban 

Studies, 8 West 40th Street, 

New York, NY 10018 



Institute for Architecture 

and Urban Studies 

FY 1982 

$22,500 

22-4250-139 

Contact: Director of 

Exhibitions, Institute for 

Architecture and Urban 

Studies, 8 West 40ih Street, 

New York. NY 10018 



Institute for Architecture 

and Urban Studies 

FY 1982 

$21,000 

22-4250-052 

Contact: Director of 

Exhibitions, Institute for 

Architecture and Urban 

Studies, 8 West 40th Street, 

New York, NY 10018 



Institute for Architecture 

and Urban Studies 

FY 1982 

$15,000 

22-4250-051 

Contact: Director, 

Exhibition Program, 

Institute for Architecture 

and Urban Studies, 8 West 

40th Street, New York, NY 

10018 



International Center for 

Photography 

FY 1979 

$30,000 

92^212-148 

Contact: Project Director. 

International Center for 

Photography. 1130 Fifth 

Avenue. New York. NY 

10028 



Iredale, Ralph 

FY 1979 

$5,000 

91-4232-036 

Contact: International 

Design Collaborative. 2407 

Main Street. Santa Monica. 

CA 90405 



To further develop the National Ar- 
chitecture Exchange, a touring exhibition 
and lecture series focusing on contempo- 
rary design issues. 



To present an exhibition. Contemporary 
Spanish Architecture, on the works of 
ten Spanish architects of the 1970s. An 
exhibit catalogue was also produced. 



To prepare an exhibition of contempo- 
rary American architecture focusing on 
the aesthetic innovations implemented in 
recent California projects: a sensitivity to 
ecological needs and ties to developments 
in Europe and Asia. 



For a retrospective exhibition on the 
work of architect William Lescaze. The 
project assessed the impact of Lescaze's 
efforts in introducing the international 
style to this country. The show included 
drawings, photographs and blueprints. A 
catalogue entitled William Lescaze was 
published by Rizzoli Institute in 1982. 



To produce an exhibition documenting 
the personal design alterations homeown- 
ers have made in three American cities: 
New York, Chicago and Los Angeles. 



To collect multimedia documentary ma- 
terials on the worldwide lecture tour of 
architect Konrad Wachsmann (February 
to August, 1979). Wachsmann was a 
contemporary of Gropius, Mies Van der 
Rohe and other Bauhaus figures. 



La Jolla Museum of 

Contemporary Art 

FY 1982 

$10,000 

22-4250-232 

Contact: Curator, La Jolla 

Museum of Contemporary 

Art. 700 Prospect Street, La 

Jolla. CA 92037 



Lee. Tunney F. 

FY 1980 

$7,500 

01-4210-037 

Contact: Massachusetts 

Institute of Technology, 

Room 10-485, Cambridge, 

MA 02139 



Los Angeles Museum of 

Modern Art 

FY 1982 

$17,500 

22-4250-6001 

Contact: Chief Curator, Los 

Angeles Museum of Modern 

Art, 609 South Grand 

Avenue, Suite 601, Los 

Angeles, C A 90017 



Lumen, Inc. 

FY 1987 

$8,000 

87-4251-0113 

Contact: Chairman, Lumen, 

Inc., 446 West 20th Street. 

New York, NY 1 00 1 1 



Magnolia Tree Earth Center 

of Bedford-Stuyvesant 

FY 1979 

$8,280 

92-4212-044 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Magnolia Tree Earth Center 

of Bedford-Stuyvesant, 1512 

Fulton Street, Brooklyn, NY 

11216 



Maryland Institute College 

of Art 

FY 1983 

$8,000 

32-4250-00038 

Contact: President, 

Maryland Institute College 

of Art, 1 300 West Mount 

Royal, Baltimore, MD 

21217 



For a traveling exhibition, California 
Connections. The exhibit explored the or- 
igins of the radical changes in architec- 
ture in California today. The works of 
Franklin Israel, Eric Owen Moss, Frank 
Gehry, William Turnbull and Daniel and 
Barbara Solomon were examined in the 
exhibit, and a catalogue was published. 



To initiate an exchange of exhibits be- 
tween United States architectural schools 
and those of the People's Republic of 
China. 



For the initial research phase for a trav- 
eling exhibition on the life and work of 
architect Louis I. Kahn. The exhibit was 
intended as the premier showcase for the 
museum's design program. 



To produce a videotape documenting the 
reconstruction of Mies van der Rohe's 
German Pavilion for Barcelona's 1929 
International Exposition. 



For a traveling and permanent exhibition 
on how to distinguish various architec- 
tural styles using walking tours, 
drawings, photographs, paintings and 
other visual materials. 



To produce an exhibition on the decision- 
making process used by graphic design- 
ers. The show, entitled Graphic Design: 
Idea to Image, featured the work of 
twelve outstanding graphic designers. A 
symposium, "Developing Design — Devel- 
oping Designers," was held concurrently. 



DESIGN EDUCATION AND PROFESSIONAL ADVANCEMENT 199 



Massachusetts College of 

Art 

FY 1980 

$14,656 

02-4250-125 

Contact: Chairman, Design 

Department, Massachusetts 

College of Art, 364 

Brookline Avenue, Boston, 

MA 022 1 5 



Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology 

FY 1983 

$15,000 

32-4250-00111 

Contact: Chairman, Visual 

Arts, Massachusetts 

Institute of Technology, 77 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

Room 7-145, Cambridge, 

MA 02139 



Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology 
FY 1983 
$20,000 
32-4250-00040 
Contact: Director, 
Laboratory of Architecture 
and Planning, MIT, 77 
Massachusetts Avenue, 
Cambridge, MA 02139 



Moore, Sandra 
FY 1984 
$4,000 
41-4213-0141 
Contact: Associate 
Professor, New Jersey 
Institute of Technology, 
Newark, NJ 07102 



Moore, Sandra and 

Aumente, Jerome 

FY 1985 

$6,000 

51-4213-0147 

Contact: School of 

Architecture, New Jersey 

Institute of Technology, 

Martin Luther King 

Boulevard, Newark, NJ 

07102 



Municipal Art Society 

FY 1979 

$25,000 

92-4212-150 

Contact: Project Director, 

Municipal Art Society, 30 

Rockefeller Plaza, New 

York, NY 10020 



For research and design of an exhibition 
entitled Designed in Boston — 350 Years 
of Innovation. Objects whose designs 
originated in Boston were featured; these 
include the safety razor, clipper ship, 
subway car and graphics, fireplug, news- 
paper, as well as Olmsted's "emerald 
necklace" of parks. 



For an exhibition, the Aesthetics of 
Progress, that considers design as a 
means of defining progress. The show 
sought to discover to what degree the 
man-made environment reflects optimism 
or pessimism about the future. A cata- 
logue and poster accompanied the ex- 
hibit. 



To produce a case study handbook and 
an audiovisual package illustrating the 
problems of managing large-scale urban 
design projects. The role of the client in 
the design management process was ex- 
amined in the report. The goal was to aid 
in creating an eff"ective means of manag- 
ing the art and business of design. 



To organize a documentary film on indi- 
vidual black women architects. A geo- 
graphical map of black women in ar- 
chitecture and a photo essay were 
prepared. 



For a film documenting the work of 
black female architects. Data from an 
earlier grant was evaluated, and potential 
sites for a national archive on black 
women in architecture were investigated. 
The aims of this phase were to develop a 
format and script and to investigate pro- 
duction and distribution options. 



To produce an exhibition of the docu- 
ments that led to the preservation of the 
landmark Villard Houses in midtown 
Manhattan. The exhibit was entitled The 
Villard Houses: Life Story of a Land- 
mark. 



Municipal Art Society 

FY 1982 

$20,000 

22-4250-094 

Contact: Executive Director. 

Municipal Art Society, 475 

Madison Avenue, New 

York, NY 10022 



Museum of Modern Art 
FY 1982 
$9,000 
22-4250-059 
Contact: Director, 
Architecture and Design, 
The Museum of Modern 
Art, 1 1 West 53rd Street, 
New York, NY I00I9 



Museum of Modern Art 
FY 1977 
$15,000 
R70-42-190C 
Contact: Director, 
Architecture and Design, 
The Museum of Modern 
Art, 1 1 West 53rd Street, 
New York, NY 10019 



Museum of Modern Art 
FY 1986 
$25,000 
86-4256-0001 
Contact: Director, The 
Museum of Modern Art, 
West 53rd Street, New 
York, NY 10019 



Neuhart, John 

FY 1980 

$8,500 

01-4210-038 

Contact: 1728 Monterey 

Boulevard, Hermosa Beach, 

CA 90254 



New York Chapter, 
American Institute of 
Architects Foundation 
FY 1978 
$28,600 
R80-42-122 
Contact: New York 
Chapter, American Inslilutc 
of Architects Foundation, 
20 West 40th Street, New 
York, NY 10018 



For a two-part exhibit and catalogue. At 
Home in the City. Part one addressed 
design concerns in nineteenth-century 
rowhouses and tenements, and part two 
examined design issues prevalent in re- 
cent New York housing developments. 



For an exhibit on the architecture of 
Richard Neutra. A catalogue. The Ar- 
chitecture of Richard Neutra: From In- 
ternational Style to California Modern 
(by Arthur Drexler and Thomas S. 
Hines) was published in 1982. A $16,000 
amendment, grant number 22-4250- 
059.1, was awarded in 1982. 



To commission five architectural projects 
in conjunction with the Museum of Mod- 
ern Art's exhibition Transformations in 
Modern Architecture. The exhibition was 
held in spring 1979; a catalogue of the 
same name (by Arthur Drexler) was also 
published in 1979. 



For an exhibition and publications on the 
architecture of Mies van der Rohe, in ob- 
servance of the centennial of his birth in 
1886. The exhibit included monumental 
exhibition drawings for his projects in 
the 1920s, mural-size photographs, archi- 
tectural models and a full-scale mockup 
of architectural details. 



For research on the life and work of 
graphic designer Eric Gill. 



To develop a project aimed at improving 
the visual and perceptive skills of the 
public. Instructional "bits" of visual in- 
formation were assembled into modules 
that deal with ways of looking at the 
built and designed environments. 



200 CHAPTER FIVE 



New York Foundation for 

the Arts 

FY 1981 

$34,100 

12-4250-035 

Contact: Project Director, 

New York Foundation for 

the Arts, 5 Beekman Street, 

New York, NY 10038 



New York Foundation for 

the Arts 

FY 1984 

$30,000 

42-4256-0054 

Contact: Executive Director, 

New York Foundation for 

the Arts, 5 Beekman Street, 

Suite 600, New York, NY 

10038 



New York Foundation for 
the Arts 
FY 1985 
$25,000 
52-4256-0117 
Contact: Director, New 
York Foundation for the 
Arts, 5 Beekman Street, 
New York, NY 10038 



New York Foundation for 
the Arts 
FY 1985 
$50,000 
52-4256-0166 
Contact: Director, New 
York Foundation for the 
Arts, 5 Beekman Street. 
New York, NY 10038 



New York Foundation for 

the Arts 

FY 1986 

$15,000 

86-4256-0085 

Contact: Director, New 

York Foundation for the 

Arts, 5 Beekman Street, 

Suite 600, New York, NY 

10038 



New York Foundation for 

the Arts 

FY 1987 

$30,000 

87-4251-0125 

Contact: Director, New 

York Foundation for the 

Arts, 5 Beekman Street, 

Suite 600, New York, NY 

10038 



For a documentary film that explores 
concerns and goals of contemporary ar- 
chitecture using architect Paul Rudolph 
as a representative example: his design 
criteria, methods and process and the ef- 
fectiveness of his message. 



For Yesterday's Tomorrows, a documen- 
tary film examining the image of the fu- 
ture in twentieth-century film. It in- 
cludes footage from thirty-four movies 
and examines the changing perceptions 
of the future in American science fiction 
movies. A book was also published: Yes- 
terday's Tomorrows: Past Visions of the 
American Future, by Joseph Corn and 
Brian Horrigan (1984). 



To produce the American segment of a 
film series, "The New Architecture," fo- 
cusing on the work of architects from six 
different countries. A videotape featur- 
ing Richard Meier, who designed the 
High Museum in Atlanta, Georgia, was 
produced. 



For a film entitled The Architecture of 
Mies van der Rohe. The film is a por- 
trait of the architect and a critical 
examination of his contribution to twenti- 
eth-century architecture. It features his 
buildings in the United States, Germany, 
Spain and Czechoslovakia and contains 
rare footage of Mies explaining his phi- 
losophy. 



For research, script writing and produc- 
tion fundraising for a dramatized bio- 
graphical film on Frank Lloyd Wright. 



To produce a film on the work of Robert 
Venturi for general audiences interested 
in contemporary architecture. Venturi 
was chosen as the subject because of his 
impact on the current themes of modern 
architecture. 



New York Landmarks 

Conservancy 

FY 1980 

$10,000 

02-4251-011 

Contact: Executive Director, 

New York Landmarks 

Conservancy, 17 Battery 

Place, New York, NY 

10004 



Passonneau, Joseph R. 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R71-42-23N 

Contact: 3015 Q Street, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20007 



Perin, Constance 

FY 1980 

$7,500 

01-4214-027 

Contact: 38 Feno Street, 

Cambridge, MA 02138 



Powell, John E. 

FY 1987 

$10,000 

87-4216-0048 

Contact: llA East 

Cambridge Avenue, Fresno, 

CA 93704 



Project for Public Spaces 

FY 1983 

$30,000 

32-4250-00117 

Contact: Project Director, 

Project for Public Spaces, 

875 Avenue of the 

Americas, New York, NY 

10001 



Rabinovitch, David 

FY 1985 

$10,000 

5 M2 13-0064 

Contact: 1 50 Madrone 

Avenue, Larkspur, CA 

94939 



To produce an exhibit of projects that 
demonstrate creative approaches to the 
design aspects of historic preservation. 
The exhibit included drawings, models 
and photographs of restoration and pres- 
ervation projects by members of the 
Preservation Alumni of Columbia Uni- 
versity. A report on the exhibit was is- 
sued. 



To produce a narrative and a slide show 
entitled "The City of the Future: Wash- 
ington, D.C., Designed as a Case Study.' 
The presentation focused on potentials 
for the use of energy, public transit and 
urban lands. 



To create a short course on the methods 
and vocabulary of film and video, with 
the goal of working on a series of film 
treatments of the design process. 



For an exhibition of late nineteenth- and 
early twentieth-century architectural 
drawings from the central San Joaquin 
Valley. More than 4,000 architectural 
drawings by pioneer and early modern 
architects who worked in the valley have 
been indexed. 



To produce soundtracks for two films on 
public space design: Waiting for the Bus 
and What Do People Do Downtown?. 



For a research trip to Japan and promo- 
tional efforts for a series of television 
documentaries entitled "Made in Japan: 
Designers for the New Global Market- 
place." The series considers Japanese 
culture and design and compares the 
similarities and differences in Japanese 
and American approaches. 



DESIGN EDUCATION AND PROFESSIONAL ADVANCEMENT 20 1 



Root, David 

FY 1977 

$11,275 

PC 77-1 

Conlaci: 490 M Street, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20024 



Schumacher, Thomas L. 

FY 1987 

$10,000 

87-4216-0146 

Conlaci: 4406 Underwood 

Street, University Park, MD 

20782 



Snyder, Robert 

FY 1981 

$3,000 

1M213-108 

Contact: 15313 Whitfield 

Avenue, Pacific Palisades, 

CA 90272 



Southern Illinois University 

FY 1979 

$6,000 

92-4212-055 

Contact: Vice-President, 

Center for Urban and 

Environmental Research, 

Southern Illinois University, 

Edwardsville. IL 62026 



Syracuse University 

FY 1985 

$8,000 

52-4256-0167 

Contact: Director, Office of 

Sponsored Programs, 

Syracuse University, 

Syracuse, NY 13210 



Tacoma Art Museum 

FY 1981 

$5,000 

12-4250-205 

Contact: Director, Tacoma 

Art Museum, 12th and 

Pacific Avenues, Tacoma, 

WA 98402 



Taylor, Crombie 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R7 1-42- ION 

Contact: 5543 Village 

Green, Los Angeles, CA 

90016 



To design, produce and install a traveling 
mini-exhibit for the Federal Design Im- 
provement Program. 



To produce a series of videotape lectures 
about the relationship of facades to sur- 
rounding urban spaces. The videos are 
intended as pedagogical aids. 



To prepare a multimedia exhibit package 
and catalogue entitled the Design Sci- 
ence of Buckminster Fuller. 



For research on the reuse of older, more 
commonplace structures as a major part 
of the urban fabric. A book, Community 
Harmony: The Reuse of Ordinary Struc- 
tures, published in 1980, set forth the re- 
search findings and traced the attitudinal 
changes toward saving these buildings. 



To develop a traveling exhibition on 
structural innovations in architecture, in- 
cluding nineteenth-century works, con- 
temporary projects and recent theoretical 
innovations. 



To photograph and catalogue the Sara 
Little collection of more than 5,000 de- 
signed objects. 



To develop a multimedia presentation en- 
titled "Architecture: Reason and Envi- 
ronment." Buildings from Byzantium to 
the present day were featured, with em- 
phasis on spatial characteristics stem- 
ming from technological change, particu- 
larly the control of light. A $5,000 
amendment, grant number R8I-42-I9N, 
was made in 1978. 



Thomas, Ronald 
FY 1979 
$19,500 
PC 79-17 

Contact: President, 
Community Design 
Information Center, 1346 
Connecticut Avenue, N.W., 
Suite 1005, Washington, 
DC 20036 



Trustees of Columbia 

University 

FY 1983 

$17,500 

32^250-00048 

Contact: Dean, Columbia 

University, Graduate School 

of Architecture, 402 Avery 

Hall, New York, NY 10027 



University of Wisconsin, 

Madison 

FY 1987 

$20,000 

87-4251-0124 

Contact: Director, Research 

Administration, University 

of Wisconsin, Madison, 750 

University Avenue, 

Madison, WI 53706 



Vision, Inc. 

FY 1982 

$20,000 

22-4252-081 

Contact: President, Vision, 

Inc., 678 Massachusetts 

Avenue, Cambridge, MA 

02139 



Vision, Inc. 

FY 1983 

$25,000 

32^25000121 

Contact: President, Vision, 

Inc., 219 Concord Avenue, 

Cambridge, MA 02138 



Walker Art Center 
FY 1980 
$17,500 
02-4251-061 
Contact: Chief Curator, 
Walker Art Center, 
Vineland Place, 
Minneapolis, MN 55403 



To produce a visual presentation describ- 
ing the design professions to laymen. 
Amendments were made for the produc- 
tion of slide presentations tailored to spe- 
cific needs of design professionals and 
for technical assistance for the Design 
Excellence Program. 



For a traveling exhibition entitled Ameri- 
can Architecture: In Search of Tradi- 
tions and a symposium on the same 
topic. The events inaugurated the out- 
reach activities of the Center for the 
Study of American Architecture, form- 
ing part of its effort to establish a theo- 
retical basis for the study of American 
architectural tradition. 



To produce an exhibition of Frank Lloyd 
Wright's projects and proposals for Mad- 
ison, Wisconsin, including some 200 
works — drawings, furniture, scale mod- 
els, blueprints and photographs. 



To research the current and potential 
utilization of video technology and cable 
TV for design arts professionals, includ- 
ing a literature search and a survey of 
successful and innovative ways video is 
currently being used by design offices. 



To produce a pilot video magazine aimed 
at showcasing the design arts for general 
audiences. The goal was to explore the 
nature of problem solving through de- 
sign, the evolution of design ideas and 
the inspiration behind design invention. 



For the City Segments project, an exhi- 
bition of original architects" drawings 
and a symposium on architectural design 
criticism which used the projects and 
drawings as a point of departure. 



202 CHAPTER FIVE 



Walker Art Center 
FY 1985 
$25,000 
52^231-0162 
Contact: Assistant 
Controller, Walker Art 
Center. Vineland Place, 
Minneapolis, MN 55403 



Walker Art Center 
FY 1986 
$30,000 
86^256-0023 
Contact: Assistant 
Controller, Walker Art 
Center, Vineland Place, 
Minneapolis, MN 55403 



For the first major exhibition of the ar- 
chitecture of Frank O. Gehry, comprised 
of his works from 1964 to 1985. 



Walker Art Center 

FY 1987 

$40,000 

87-4251-0060 

Contact: Director of Budget, 

Walker Art Center, 

Vineland Place, 

Minneapolis, MN 55403 



WGBH Educational 
Foundation 
FY 1980 
$18,413 
02^250-144 
Contact: WGBH 
Educational Foundation, 
125 Western Avenue, 
Boston, MA 02134 



Whitney Museum of 

American Art 

FY 1984 

$40,000 

42-4255-0063 

Contact: Director, Whitney 

Museum of American Art, 

945 Madison Avenue, New 

York, NY 11021 



For the exhibition, The Architecture of 
Frank O. Gehry. The exhibit included 
drawings, photographs, models and col- 
lections of his cardboard furniture and 
decorative lamps. The architect designed 
full-scale environments to house the ma- 
terial in the exhibit. A 216-page cata- 
logue was published, and the exhibit 
traveled to four other museums. 



To support an exhibition and publication 
program entitled Architecture Tomor- 
row. 



To produce four videotaped interviews 
with well-known designers, a pilot project 
for the Center for Videotaped Archives 
in the Arts. The tapes are stored at the 
WGBH Workshop Center and are avail- 
able to universities, scholars, museums 
and others via a satellite communications 
system through local PBS stations. A 
$10,000 amendment, grant number 12- 
4250-9014, was made in 1981. 



For the exhibit and catalogue. High 
Style: Eight Decades of American Van- 
guard Design. The exhibit focused on the 
contributions of twentieth-century Amer- 
ican architects and designers and identi- 
fied certain design qualities as distinctly 
American. Guest curators were chosen 
for five of the six periods covered, and 
each curator prepared a chapter for the 
catalogue. 



Symposia, Workshops, Lectures and 
Retreats 



Alameda County 

Neighborhood Arts Program 

FY 1980 

$8,000 

02-4250-105 

Contact: Director, Western 

Addition, Alameda County 

Neighborhood Arts 

Program, 1214 Webster 

Street, Oakland, CA 94612 



American Federation of the 

Arts 

FY 1977 

$8,500 

R70-42-176C 

Contact: American 

Federation of the Arts, 41 

East 65th Street, New 

York, NY 10021 



American Institute of 
Architects Foundation 
FY 1977 
$11,400 
R70-42-95C 
Contact: President, 
American Institute of 
Architects Foundation, 1799 
New York Avenue, N.W, 
Washington, DC 20006 



American Institute of 
Architects Foundation 
FY 1977 
$15,000 
R70-42-I65C 
Contact: President, 
American Institute of 
Architects Foundation, 1799 
New York Avenue, N.W., 
Washington, DC 20006 



American Institute of 

Graphic Arts 

FY 1983 

$10,000 

32-4250-00093 

Contact: Managing Editor, 

American Institute of 

Graphic Arts, 1059 Third 

Avenue, New York, NY 

10021 



To expand the activities of Western Ad- 
dition, which produces lectures, semi- 
nars, forums, and exhibitions. The goal is 
to extend its work to cultivate a stronger 
reflection of West Coast architecture and 
design. 



For scholarships to allow twenty-five stu- 
dents to attend the 1977 International 
Design Conference in Aspen, Colorado. 



To sponsor a national design conference 
in October 1977. The conference focused 
on a broad spectrum of design issues 
from the viewpoints of theory, practice, 
philosophy, education, history, criticism 
and literature. 



For audiovisual presentations for the 
1977 national convention of the Ameri- 
can Institute of Architects. 



To plan a forum on the past, present and 
future of graphic design in America. The 
aims were to allow designers to focus on 
the graphics profession in historical, criti- 
cal and theoretical terms and to help de- 
fine the graphic designer's role. 



DESIGN EDUCATION AND PROFESSIONAL ADVANCEMENT 203 



American Institute of 

Graphic Arts 

FY 1985 

$25,000 

52-4256-0034 

Contact: Director, American 

Institute of Graphic Arts, 

1059 Third Avenue, New 

York, NY 10021 



American Society of 

Interior Designers 

FY 1980 

$12,000 

02-4250-218 

Contact: American Society 

of Interior Designers, 730 

Fifth Avenue, New York, 

NY 10019 



Architectural Research 
Centers Consortium 
FY 1981 
$10,000 
12-4221-138 
Contact: Professor of 
Architecture and Urban 
Policy, Architectural 
Research Centers 
Consortium, 1735 New 
York Avenue, N.W., 
Washington, DC 20006 



Association of Collegiate 

Schools of Architecture 

FY 1980 

$14,000 

02-4221-199 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Association of Collegiate 

Schools of Architecture, 

1735 New York Avenue, 

N W., Washington, DC 

20006 



Association of Collegiate 

Schools of Architecture 

FY 1981 

$60,000 

CA 81-27 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Association of Collegiate 

Schools of Architecture, 

1735 New York Avenue, 

N.W, Washington, DC 

20006 



Blueprint for Architecture 
FY 1986 
$29,000 
86-4256-0027 
Contact: President, 
Blueprint for Architecture, 
PO. Box 20486, Broadway 
Station, Seattle, WA 98102 



To support the 1985 American Institute 
of Graphic Arts Conference. The aims 
were to address professional practice, re- 
gional communication, education, tech- 
nology, history and criticism. 



To record the proceedings of the 
Amerian Society of Interior Designers' 
national conference in August 1980. 



To conduct an architectural design re- 
search symposium in summer of 1981. 
The conference brought together twenty- 
five key people in architectural and ur- 
ban design research from private firms, 
government agencies and universities. 



For a survey of the ninety-two schools of 
architecture in the United States to de- 
termine the nature and scope of design 
research. A symposium on architectural 
design research was held later to estab- 
lish a basis for expanding dialogue 
among the disparate schools, practicing 
professionals and government agencies. 



To plan and implement workshops, pan- 
els and conferences promoting design ex- 
cellence. The work was continued 
through amendment CA 81-27.2 for 
$12,000 and CA 81-27.3 for $14,400. A 
book entitled Building for the Arts was 
produced. 



To prepare a series of public events ex- 
ploring the avant-garde in architecture, 
landscape architecture, interior design 
and urban planning in four northwestern 
states and in British Columbia. 



Bruce, Michael 

FY 1978 

$30,450 

PC 78-45 

Contact: 439 East Luray 

Avenue, Alexandria, VA 

22301 



California Council/ 

American Institute of 

Architects 

FY 1981 

$30,000 

12-4250-023 

Contact: Conference 

Manager, California 

Council/American Institute 

of Architects, 315 1 4th 

Street, Oakland, CA 94612 



Consanti Foundation 

FY 1978 

$3,000 

R80-42-148 

Contact: Architecture and 

Design, Consanti 

Foundation, 6433 

Doubletree Road, 

Scottsdale, AZ 85253 



Conservation Foundation 

FY 1980 

$17,481 

02-4250-077 

Contact: Senior Associate, 

The Conservation 

Foundation, 1717 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

N.W, Washington, DC 

20036 



Cooper Union for the 

Advancement of Science 

and Art 

FY 1985 

$84,999 

NEA DCA 85-51 

Contact: Cooper Union for 

the Advancement of Science 

and Art, 41 Cooper Square, 

New York, NY 10003 



Cooper Union for the 

Advancement of Science 

and Art 

FY 1987 

$123,613 

NEA DCA 87-40 

Contact: Director of 

Development, Cooper Union 

for the Advancement of 

Science and Art, 41 Cooper 

Square, New York, NY 



To provide technical support services for 
the Federal Design Improvement Pro- 
gram and the Fourth Federal Design As- 
sembly, and to produce a compendium of 
photography documenting accomplish- 
ments of selected Design Arts Program 
grantees. 



To organize the first annual Monterey 
Design Conference and to create a de- 
sign communication education program, 
including a portable multimedia exhi- 
bition. 



For a touring lecture program based on 
the design theories of Paolo Soleri. 



To plan a seminar entitled "Conservation 
and Revitalization: An Economic Devel- 
opment Strategy for Today's Cities." 
The seminar was cosponsored with the 
National Trust for Historic Preservation. 
A report on urban conservation, federal 
aid and economic development was is- 
sued. 



To organize and coordinate five symposia 
on design topics related to initiatives of 
the Arts Endowment's Design Arts Pro- 
gram. 



To research and organize a symposium 
on topics related to the initiatives of the 
Design Arts Program. 



204 CHAPTER FIVE 



Cultural Alliance of Greater 

Washington 

FY 1982 

$10,000 

22-4250-240 

ConlacI: Executive Director, 

Cultural Alliance of Greater 

Washington, 805 15th 

Street, N.W, Washington, 

DC 20005 



Design Foundation 

FY 1978 

$15,000 

R80-42-19 

Contact: The Design 

Foundation, One IBM. 

Plaza, Suite 2900, Chicago, 

IL 60611 



Environmental Design 

Research Association 

FY 1980 

$10,000 

02^221-203 

Contact: Board of Directors, 

Environmental Design 

Research, University of 

Wisconsin, School of 

Architecture, Milwaukee, 

Wl 53201 



Foundation for Preservation 

Technology 

FY 1978 

$9,090 

R80-42-I87CN 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Foundation for Preservation 

Technology, National 

Conservation Council, 

Smithsonian Institution, 

Washington, DC 20560 



George, Catherine F. 

FY 1978 

$27,500 

PC 78-18 

Contact: 467 Depot Street, 

Dennisport, MA 02639 



Georgia Department of 

Community Affairs 

FY 1982 

$4,000 

22-4250-138 

Contact: Director of 

Administration, Georgia 

Department of Community 

Affairs, 40 Marietta Street, 

N.W, Eighth Floor, 

Atlanta, GA 30303 



To document "Design Seminar: An Ur- 
ban Site," a syposium and design studio 
charette intended both as a model for 
continuing education in design and as an 
introduction to the design process for 
non-designers. A report of the same title 
was produced. 



For the First National Conference on Ur- 
ban Design, October 18-21, 1978. The 
proceedings were published in 1978 by 
RC Publications, Inc. 



To support a task force on design re- 
search. The purpose was to assess the 
state of environmental design research 
and to prepare an agenda for the 1980s. 
Two retreats were held and a report, 
Environmental Design Research Direc- 
tions for the Future, was issued. 



For follow-up activities, task force meet- 
ings and site visits pertaining to the Re- 
port of the Study Committee on Archi- 
tectural Conservation published by the 
National Conservation Advisory Council 
in 1976. 



For services related to the Federal 
Graphics Improvement Project: policy 
and project development, seminars for 
editors and assistance for the Fourth 
Federal Design Assembly. 



To present a southwest regional confer- 
ence, "Design 82: Rehabilitation for the 
Professional." The conference focused on 
the technical aspects of preservation and 
ways of integrating new design with old. 



Hampton Institute 

FY 1983 

$10,000 

32-4250-00180 

Contact: Chair, Department 

of Architecture, Hampton 

Institute, Hampton, VA 

23668 



Hilbertz, Wolf H. 

FY 1979 

$9,720 

91-4232-103 

Contact: c/o School of 

Architecture, University of 

Texas, Austin, TX 78712 



Institute for Architecture 

and Urban Studies 

FY 1977 

$17,000 

R60-42-IC 

Contact: Director, Institute 

for Architecture and Urban 

Studies, 8 West 40th Street, 

New York, NY 10023 



International Design 
Education Foundation 
FY 1979 
$15,370 
92-4236-116 
Contact: Chairman, 
Scholarship Center, 
International Design 
Education Foundation, 5900 
Wilshire Boulevard, Los 
Angeles, CA 90036 



International Design 
Education Foundation 
FY 1980 
$17,750 
02^250-122 
Contact: Director, 
International Design 
Education Foundation, 5900 
Wilshire Boulevard, Los 
Angeles, CA 90036 



International Design 

Education Foundation 

FY 1981 

$25,000 

12-4221-143 

Contact: Scholarship 

Chairman, International 

Design Education 

Foundation, 5900 Wilshire 

Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 

90036 



For a one-day conference, "In Celebra- 
tion of Black Women in the Design Pro- 
fessions: Past, Present and Future." Rep- 
resentatives from a variety of design 
fields participated. 



To present a workshop for designers and 
scientists to study the mineral accretion 
process with the aim of creating a tech- 
nique for building in sea water. 



For an evening lecture program on the 
influence of architecture, planning and 
design on contemporary lifestyles. 



To provide twenty-five fellowships for 
students to attend the International De- 
sign Conference in Aspen, Colorado. For 
twenty-nine years the conference has 
served as a forum for the interdisciplin- 
ary exchange of ideas and resources. 



For student scholarships to attend the 
1980 International Design Conference in 
Aspen. The scholarships were meant to 
ensure balanced economic, professional 
and geographic participation. 



For fellowships for the 1981 Interna- 
tional Design Conference, with special 
emphasis on encouraging minority stu- 
dents. The program was continued 
through two amendments of $30,000 
each, grant numbers 22-4212-9143.1 
(1982) and 32-4221-90143.1 (1983). 



DESIGN EDUCATION AND PROFESSIONAL ADVANCEMENT 205 



International Design 

Education Foundation 

FY 1983 

$16,160 

32-4212-00139 

Contact: Executive Director, 

International Design 

Education Foundation, 257 

Park Avenue South, New 

York, NY lOOIO 



International Design 

Education Foundation 

FY 1984 

$18,740 

42-4213-0064 

Contact: Executive Director, 

International Design 

Education Foundation, RO. 

Box 1850, New York, NY 

10159 



International Design 
Education Foundation 
FY 1984 
$30,000 
42-4213-00007 
Contact: Chairman, 
International Design 
Education Foundation, 
Scholarship Committee, 207 
East 32nd Street, New 
York, NY 10036 



International Design 

Education Foundation 

FY 1987 

$31,000 

87-4218-0002 

Contact: Executive Director, 

International Design 

Education Foundation, 207 

East 32nd Street, New 

York, NY 10016 



Lautman, Kay 

FY 1978 

$205,000 

PC 78-1 1 

Contact: 1 826 Jetferson 

Place, N.W.. Washington, 

DC 20036 



Los Angeles Museum of 
Modern Art 
FY 1980 
$3,000 
02-4250-229 
Contact: Symposium 
Coordinator, Los Angeles 
Museum of Modern Art, 
609 South Grand Street, 
Los Angeles, C A 90017 



For travel assistance to bring young prac- 
titioners in the fields of architecture, 
landscape architecture, urban design, 
graphic design, industrial design, film 
and media to the 1984 International De- 
sign Conference in Aspen. 



To sponsor the attendance of mid-career 
professionals at the 1984 International 
Design Conference in Aspen. Fellowships 
were awarded to individuals whose work 
related to the conference theme: Canada, 
USA, Mexico — Neighbors. 



For fellowships specifically targeted for 
minority students for the 1984, 1985 and 
1986 International Design Conferences 
in Aspen, Colorado. The fellowships en- 
abled 132 students from fifty-five schools 
throughout the United States and Puerto 
Rico to participate. 



For fellowships for the 1987 Interna- 
tional Design Conferences in Aspen, Col- 
orado. Funds permitted thirty-four stu- 
dents from sixteen schools to attend. 



To organize and coordinate the Fourth 
Federal Design Assembly. The confer- 
ences were held for federal adminis- 
trators and designers to increase their 
awareness of the importance and rele- 
vancy of good design. 



To host a symposium that focused on the 
possibility of establishing an architecture 
and design department at the museum. 



Milwaukee Art Center 
FY 1977 
$7,000 
R70-42-I83 
Contact: Curator for 
Architecture, Milwaukee 
Art Center, 750 North 
Lincoln Memorial Drive, 
Milwaukee, Wl 53202 



National Committee on 

United States-China 

Relations 

FY 1980 

$11,830 

02-4250-216 

Contact: Vice-President, 

National Committee on 

United States-China 

Relations, 777 United 

Nations Plaza, New York, 

NY 10012 



National Committee on 

United States-China 

Relations 

FY 1981 

$16,000 

12-4250-019 

Contact: National 

Committee on United 

States-China Relations, 777 

United Nations Plaza, New 

York. NY 10012 



National Institute of 

Building Science 

FY 1980 

$5,000 

02-4250-224 

Contact: President, National 

Institute of Building 

Science, 1015 15lh Street, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20005 



For a conference on the prairie school of 
architecture cosponsored with the North- 
western Architectural Archives of the 
University of Minnesota. A concurrent 
exhibition was also organized. 



For three workshops on opportunities for 
cooperation in urban design between the 
United States and the People's Republic 
of China. 



To hold a meeting of design profes- 
sionals, representatives of the Arts En- 
dowment and scholars in Chinese studies 
in order to formulate a design exchange 
program. The Chinese Design Study 
Team's visit to the United States was the 
first activity that resulted from the 
project. 



To organize a workshop on methods of 
improving access to scientific and tech- 
nical information that pertains to design 
of the built environment. A 190-page re- 
port was compiled. 




Leroy Smith, 17, works with Kevin Cahill, partner in Communi- 
cation Design, at a summer workshop held by the National Build- 
ing Museum for students with an aptitude in design. 



206 CHAPTER FIVE 



National Institute of 

Building Science 

FY 1981 

$5,000 

12-4250-020 

Contact: Project Director, 

National Institute of 

Building Science, 1015 15th 

Street, N.W., Washington, 

DC 20006 



National Trust for Historic 

Preservation 

FY 1978 

$15,000 

R8(M2-26 

Contact: National Trust for 

Historic Preservation, 1785 

Massachusetts Avenue., 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20036 



Partners for Livable Places 

FY 1982 

$21,618 

DCA 82-3 

Contact: President, Partners 

for Livable Places, 1429 

21st Street, N.W., 

Washington, DC 20036 



Partners for Livable Places 

FY 1984 

$5,000 

42-4231-0030 

Contact: President, Partners 

for Livable Places, 1429 

21st Street, N.W, 

Washington, DC 20036 



Pennsylvania State 

University 

FY 1982 

$10,000 

22-4250068 

Contact: Department Head, 

Landscape Architecture, 

Pennsylvania State 

University, University Park, 

PA 16802 



For a workshop on methods of improving 
access to scientific and technical in- 
formation on the design of the built envi- 
ronment. 



Purdue University 

FY 1983 

$15,000 

32-4250-00049 

Contact: Assistant Director, 

Division of Sponsored 

Programs, Purdue 

University, West Lafayette, 

IN 47907 



For a national conference on the design 
compatibility of old and new architec- 
ture. The conference explored theoretical 
approaches, their relevance in practice 
and benefits of design codes and ordi- 
nances. A book entitled Old and New 
Architecture: Design Relationship was 
published by the Preservation Press in 
1980. 



To conduct a design seminar in Char- 
lottesville, Virginia, focusing on ways in 
which the needs of the design disciplines 
might be better served by the Arts En- 
dowment and other public agencies. 



To establish an annual urban design 
charette program to address national de- 
sign and urban development issues. A re- 
port on a cultural planning charette held 
in Hartford, Connecticut was issued. 



For the 1982 landscape architecture con- 
ference, an annual student assembly 
hosted each spring by students in a land- 
scape architecture program. The confer- 
ence brings together students from the 
United States and Canada, and leading 
design practitioners and theorists give 
presentations. Grant support helped 
lower costs to allow a maximum number 
of students to attend. 



To support costs of speakers, workshops 
and proceedings for the 1983 conference 
of landscape architecture students. 



Rhode Island School of 

Design 

FY 1979 

$30,000 

92-4212-052 

Contact: Project Director, 

Rhode Island School of 

Design, Division of 

Architectural Studies, 

Providence, Rl 02903 



Rhode Island School of 

Design 

FY 1986 

$2,500 

86-4256-0035 

Contact: Vice-President for 

Public Affairs, Rhode 

Island School of Design, 2 

College Street, Providence, 

RI 02903 



Southern California 

Institute of Architecture 

FY 1981 

$11,460 

12-4250-038 

Contact: Director, Southern 

California Institute of 

Architecture, 1 800 Berkeley 

Street, Santa Monica, CA 

09404 



Southern California 

Institute of Architecture 

FY 1981 

$10,685 

12-4250-011 

Contact: Southern 

California Institute of 

Architecture, Special 

Programs, 1 800 Berkeley 

Street, Santa Monica, CA 

90404 



United States Committee 

for the International 

Council on Monuments and 

Sites (US/ICOMOS) 

FY 1987 

$35,550 

87-4251-0080 

Contact: Chairman, US/ 

ICOMOS, 1600 H Street, 

N.W, Washington, DC 

20006 



University of California, 

Berkeley 

FY 1980 

$16,650 

02-4251-009 

Contact: Manager, 

University of California, 

Berkeley, M-1 1 Wheeler 

Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 



To organize a two-part symposium to 
identify design issues and problems pecu- 
liar to medium-sized North American 
cities, with the aim of formulating feasi- 
ble design solutions and strategies. 



To host "Challenges of Outer Space," a 
symposium on the influence of space 
technology on design. 



For a series of public lectures in Los An- 
geles given by an international selection 
of architects. 



For a symposium on modern architecture 
in Mexico. A public lecture series, an ex- 
hibition, catalogue and video were also 
produced. An amendment, grant number 
12-4250-011.1 for $2,385, was made in 
1981. 



To publish the proceedings of the 
ICOMOS General Assembly, "Old Cul- 
tures and New Worlds," held October 
1987. Six hundred preservation profes- 
sionals from seventy countries partici- 
pated. The proceedings contain 142 pa- 
pers; a report was published in English, 
French, Spanish and Russian. 



For a national conference on conserving 
campus resources. The conference fo- 
cused on several issues including the im- 
age and character of campus conserva- 
tion and design review. A 1 1 5-page 
report was issued. 



DESIGN EDUCATION AND PROFESSIONAL ADVANCEMENT 207 



University of Washington 

FY 1982 

$4,000 

22-4250-158 

Contact: Director, Grants 

and Contracts, University of 

Washington, College of 

Architecture, 206 Arch 

Hall, AL- 15, Seattle, WA 

98195 



Virginia Commonwealth 

University 

FY 1980 

$5,824 

02-4250-142 

Contact: Chairman, 

Communications, Art and 

Design, Virginia 

Commonwealth University, 

Richmond, VA 23284 



Virginia Polytechnic 

Institute and State 

University 

FY 1977 

$9,990 

R70-42-61 

Contact: Project Director, 

Virginia Polytechnic 

Institute and State 

University, Blacksburg, VA 

24061 



Yale University 

FY 1979 

$5,000 

92-4235-270 

Contact: Dean, Yale School 

of Architecture, RO. Box 

1605, New Haven. CT 

06520 



For "Streets as Public Property," a con- 
ference conducted with the Catholic Uni- 
versity of Louvain, Belgium, on the use 
of public land to encourage private 
development and to control design qual- 
ity of surrounding areas. A book. Streets 
as Public Property: Opportunities for 
Public-Private Interaction in Planning 
and Design, was also published (Ann 
Moudon and Pierre LaConte, editors). 



For a series of eight public lectures by 
leading graphic design teachers and 
practitioners. Small seminar exchange 
sessions followed each of the lectures. 



To support participation of professionals 
from disciplines outside the mainstream 
of land use and planning at the 1977 
conference of landscape architecture stu- 
dents. 



To organize a participatory design con- 
ference and workshop to educate ar- 
chitecture students about the needs of 
physically handicapped and developmen- 
tally disabled people. A report 
documented the project. 



Design-Competition Management 
and Guidelines 



American Institute of 

Architects (AlA) 

Foundation 

FY 1980 

$30,000 

02-4222-056 

Contact: President, AIA 

Foundation, 1 799 New York 

Avenue, N.W., Washington, 

DC 20006 



American Institute of 

Architects Foundation 

FY 1981 

$10,000 

12-4221-173 

Contact: Director, Design 

and Environmental 

Program, AIA Foundation, 

1735 New York Avenue, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20006 



American Institute of 

Architects Foundation 

FY 1984 

$30,000 

42-4252-0157 

Contact: President, AIA 

Foundation, 1735 New York 

Avenue, N.W,, Washington, 

DC 20006 



Architectural League of 

New York 

FY 1984 

$50,000 

42^255-0077 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Architectural League of 

New York, 457 Madison 

Avenue, New York, NY 

10022 



Association of Student 
Chapters of the American 
Institute of Architects 
FY 1984 
$42,300 
42-4231-0155 
Contact: President, 
Association of Student 
Chapters of the AIA, 1735 
New York Avenue, N.W.. 
Washington, DC 20006 



To establish the Competition Advisory 
Service. The aims were to provide assis- 
tance to individuals and organizations, 
create an archive and produce a hand- 
book on managing design competitions. 



To continue the activities of the Ameri- 
can Institute of Architects' Competition 
Advisory Service. The Handbook of 
Architectural Design Competitions and a 
companion brochure were produced. 



To conduct a study on the impact of de- 
veloper-architect competitions on the 
built environment. The aims were to im- 
prove such competitions by analyzing de- 
sign quality, assessing their economic im- 
pact on the architecture profession and 
evaluating their overall effectiveness. A 
report resulted from the study. 



To develop an exhibition, cosponsored 
with the Embassy of France, giving a 
ten-year retrospective on design compe- 
titions in France and the United States 
and addressing such questions as when 
competitions are appropriate and what 
they can be expected to achieve. 



To hold a national student design compe- 
tition entitled Beaux Arts Planning Re- 
visited. The challenge was to use classic 
beaux arts planning principles to design a 
museum of modern art, a building or li- 
brary for the Civic Center of San Fran- 
cisco. A catalogue documented the com- 
petition. 



208 CHAPTER FIVE 



Cestello. Christine B. 

FY 1985 

$4,456 

51-4251-0048 

Contact: 4214 38th Street, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20016 



Cestello, Christine B. 

FY 1985 

$26,065 

51-4251-0075 

Contact: 4214 38th Street, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20016 



Cestello, Christine B. 

FY 1986 

$7,800 

86^251-0003 

Contact: A2\i 38th Street, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20016 



Council for International 

Urban Liaison 

FY 1980 

$15,000 

02-4250-112 

Contact: Director of 

Communications, Council 

for International Urban 

Liaison, 818 18th Street, 

N.W., No. 840, 

Washington, DC 20006 



Environmental Images, Inc. 
FY 1986 
$100,000 
NBA DC A 86-07 
Contact: President, 
Environmental Images, Inc., 
1346 Connecticut Avenue, 
N.W., Suite 325, 
Washington, DC 20036 



Farmer, Paul W. 
FY 1980 
$9,950 
01-4213-166 
Contact: 2002 East 
Newberry Boulevard, 
Milwaukee, WI 53211 



Florida A&M University 
FY 1980 
$14,860 
02-4230-211 
Contact: Research 
Associate, Florida A&M 
University, School of 
Architecture, PO. Box 597, 
Tallahassee, FL 32307 



To gather preliminary data for the analy- 
sis of design competitions sponsored by 
the Design Arts Program. 



To undertake the second phase of an 
evaluation of design competitions and to 
conduct regional workshops on the plan- 
ning and management of design compe- 
titions. 



To complete the final phase of a project 
on the planning and management of de- 
sign competitions and to conduct two re- 
gional workshops in the series. Design to 
Build, in Boston and Los Angeles. 



To research the institutional mechanisms 
employed in several countries to organize 
and provide wider public access to design 
competitions. 



To plan and conduct two one-day work- 
shops on design competition manage- 
ment. A $20,000 amendment, NEA 
DCA 86-07.1, was made in 1986. 



To publish an illustrated manual on ur- 
ban design competitions entitled The 
Anatomy of a Competition: Urban De- 
sign for Milwaukee's Lakefront. The 
manual was coauthored with Larry 
Witzling, and focused on urban design, 
as distinct from building competitions. 



To document a design competition for a 
new school of architecture at the univer- 
sity. A report, Portrait of a Competition, 
resulted. 



Giordano, Jeanne 

FY 1980 

$5,000 

01-4213-132 

Contact: Harvard Graduate 

School of Design, Gund 

Hall, Room 510, 48Quincy 

Street, Cambridge, MA 

02138 



Hoag, Richard 

FY 1984 

$10,000 

41-4213-0158 

Contact: 1 828 Mayfair 

Road, Tallahassee, FL 

32303 



Midwest Institute for 

Design and Research 

FY 1984 

$14,750 

42-4255-0083 

Contact: President, Midwest 

Institute for Design and 

Research, 2955 North 

Summit Avenue, 

Milwaukee, WI 53211 



Midwest Institute for 

Design Research 

FY 1985 

$14,900 

52-4255-0124 

Contact: President, Midwest 

Institute for Design 

Research, 2955 North 

Summit Avenue, 

Milwaukee, WI 53211 



National Association of 
Housing and 
Redevelopment Officials 
FY 1985 
$17,725 
52-4256-0010 

Contact: Executive Director, 
National Association of 
Housing and 
Redevelopment Officials, 
2600 Virginia Avenue, 
N.W., Suite 404, 
Washington, DC 20037 



Otis Art Institute of Parsons 

School of Design 

FY 1983 

$5,000 

32-4230-00070 

Contact: Director, Project 

Development, Otis Art 

Institute of Parsons School 

of Design, 2401 Wilshire 

Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 

90057 



To develop a manual documenting the 
process of a design competition con- 
ducted by the city of Salem, Oregon. 



To develop an annotated bibliography on 
architectural competitions in the United 
States. 



To develop a design competition hand- 
book, a technical manual for sponsors 
and advisors that addresses problems and 
issues involved in competition manage- 
ment. 



I 

I 

I 



To develop a casebook on the planning 
and administration of design compe- 
titions. 



\ 



To create a document for local govern- 
ments on the conduct of design-build 
competitions, a process usually involving 
a joint venture between a local govern- 
ment and a private developer. Recom- 
mended competition guidelines were 
given in a report. 



For preliminary planning for an interna- 
tional student design Olympics, a compe- [ 
tition to coincide with the Olympics * 

Games in Los Angeles in 1984. 



DESIGN EDUCATION AND PROFESSIONAL ADVANCEMENT 209 



Roger Williams College 

FY 1984 

$58,299 

42-4257-0073 

Contact: President, Roger 

Williams College, Bristol, 

Rl 02809 



Roger Williams College 

FY 1987 

$10,000 

87-4251-0062 

Contact: President, Roger 

Williams College, Old Ferry 

Road, Bristol, RI 02809 



Schluntz, Roger L. 
FY 1979 
$10,000 
91-4232-166 
Contact: 1735 
Massachusetts Avenue, 
N.W., Washington, DC 
20006 



Society of Illustrators 

FY 1983 

$14,000 

32-4250-00035 

Contact: Chairman, Society 

of Illustrators, 30 East 20th 

Street, New York, NY 

10003 



University of California, 
Santa Barbara 
FY 1984 
$7,500 

42-4255-0012 
Contact: Director, 
University Art Museum, 
University of California, 
Santa Barbara, Santa 
Barbara, CA 93106 



University of Miami 

FY 1984 

$22,000 

42-4251-0159 

Contact: Design 

Competition Registry, 

Office of the Dean, School 

of Architecture, University 

of Miami, Coral Gables, FL 

33124 



To conduct a one-stage architectural 
competition to select a designer and a de- 
sign for a new school of architecture on 
the main campus of Roger Williams Col- 
lege. 



For a publication on the 1984 national 
design competition for an architecture 
building at Roger Williams College. The 
competition attracted 1 52 submissions 
from forty-one states. An illustrated 
booklet was produced. 



To prepare a manuscript reviewing, as- 
sessing and encouraging design compe- 
titions as a method of enhancing the 
quality of the built environment. 



To create a manual for organizing and 
managing graphic design competitions. A 
report addressed appropriate procedures 
to govern such issues as eligibility, fees 
for works produced and ownership rights. 



To produce a publication on the architec- 
tural design competition for a new facil- 
ity for the University Art Museum. The 
on-site charette had 256 entries. 



To establish the Design Competition 
Registry and to develop a newsletter 
called Deadlines. The newsletter is pub- 
lished fifteen times a year, provides a 
listing of design competitions and reports 
on the results of design competitions and 
on related activities. 



University of Wisconsin 

FY 1983 

$33,106 

32-4252-00134 

Contact: Project Director, 

University of Wisconsin, 

School of Architecture, RO. 

Box 413, Milwaukee, WI 

53201 



Vision, Inc. 

FY 1979 

$10,000 

C A 79-19 

Contact: President, Vision, 

Inc., 219 Concord Avenue, 

Cambridge, MA 02138 



Vision, Inc. 

FY 1981 

$17,500 

12-4221-169 

Contact: Vice-President, 

Vision, Inc., 678 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

Cambridge, MA 02139 



Vision, Inc. 

FY 1981 

$34,000 

CA 81-16 

Contact: President, Vision, 

Inc., 219 Concord Avenue, 

Cambridge, MA 02138 



Vision, Inc. 

FY 1981 

$20,000 

12-4221-248 

Contact: Vice-President, 

Vision, Inc., 227 Concord 

Avenue, Cambridge, MA 

02138 



Vision, Inc. 

FY 1983 

$25,000 

DCA 83-22 

Contact: President, Vision, 

Inc., 219 Concord Avenue, 

Cambridge, MA 02138 



For a study on planning and design com- 
petitions in the United States. A report 
investigated fifty-one case studies and 
data analyses to distill those essential 
factors critical to success. 



To develop and conduct two projects 
testing new methods of design compe- 
titions for public building programs. 



For technical assistance to local govern- 
ments and nonprofit organizations spon- 
soring design competitions for arts facili- 
ties, public buildings and urban 
infrastructure (public spaces, streets and 
pathways). 



For production of five bulletins on design 
competitions to be distributed to practi- 
tioners in all the design disciplines. 



To develop a design competition advo- 
cacy program and to administer tech- 
nical assistance to local governments and 
nonprofit organizations planning to spon- 
sor design competitions for arts facilities, 
significant public buildings and land- 
scapes. 



To develop improved competition man- 
agement procedures for potential spon- 
sors, conduct a national symposium on 
competition management and organize 
information to assist nonprofit design 
organizations in competition manage- 
ment. 



210 CHAPTER FIVE 



Curriculum Development 



Altschuler, Michael J. 
FY 1977 
$5,000 
R71-42-1N 
Coniaci: Michael J. 
Altschuler & Associates, 
242 East 42nd Street, New 
York, NY 10021 



American Institute of 

Planners Foundation 

FY 1978 

$29,710 

R8(M2-112 

Contact: Executive Director, 

American Institute of 

Planners Foundation, 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20036 



Arizona State University 

FY 1985 

$30,000 

52-4252-0068 

Contact: Director, Arizona 

State University. Division of 

Pre-award Services, Office 

of Research, Tempe, AZ 

85287 



Association of Collegiate 

Schools of Architecture 

FY 1977 

$9,035 

R7a42-179 

Contact: Executive Editor, 

Association of Collegiate 

Schools of Architecture, 

1735 New York Avenue, 

N.W.. Washington. DC 

20006 



Association of Collegiate 

Schools of Architecture 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R70-42-55 

Contact: Editor. Association 

of Collegiate Schools of 

Architecture. 1735 New 

York Avenue, N.W, 

Washington, DC 20006 



For a field course for students and teach- 
ers to enhance their perception and 
appreciation of the visual environment. 



To conduct research necessary to estab- 
lish minimum standards for certification 
of professional planners. 



To investigate the role of imagery in the 
design process in order to expand the 
theoretical basis of design education. 
Empirical testing involved designers and 
design students who classified the spatial 
images they use and described how they 
select, manipulate and transform those 
images. Two reports were issued on the 
project. 



To prepare an index to the Journal of 
Architectural Education, the quarterly 
publication of the Association of Colle- 
giate Schools of Architecture. 



To expand and improve the Journal of 
Architectural Education and to broaden 
its distribution. 



Association of Collegiate 

Schools of Architecture 

FY 1978 

$4,320 

R80-42-189C 

Contact: Executive Editor, 

Association of Collegiate 

Schools of Architecture, 

1735 New York Avenue. 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20006 



Association of Collegiate 

Schools of Architecture 

FY 1978 

$10,000 

R80-42-16 

Contact: Association of 

Collegiate Schools of 

Architecture, 1735 New 

York Avenue, N.W, 

Washington, DC 20006 



Association of Collegiate 

Schools of Architecture 

FY 1979 

$18,170 

92-4212-139 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Association of Collegiate 

Schools of Architecture, 

1735 New York Avenue, 

N.W, Washington, DC 

20006 



Association of Collegiate 

Schools of Architecture 

FY 1980 

$30,000 

02-4251-007 

Contact: Executive Director, 

Association of Collegiate 

Schools of Architecture, 

1735 New York Avenue, 

N.W, Washington, DC 

20006 



Association of Collegiate 

Schools of Architecture 

FY 1981 

$9,314 

12-4250021 

Contact: Editor, Association 

of Collegiate Schools of 

Architecture, 1735 New 

York Avenue, N.W., 

Washington, DC 20006 



Clark, David S. 

FY 1980 

$4,000 

01-4210-031 

Contact: ?.0. Box 29191, 

Washington, DC 20017 



To support continued publication of the 
Journal of Architectural Education, 
published by Association of Collegiate 
Schools of Architecture since 1947. 



For issues of the Journal of Architec- 
tural Education focusing on gerontology, 
technology and new methods in built- 
environment communications. 



To support the Journal of Architectural 
Education, a publication on current is- 
sues for professional and academic archi- 
tectural audiences. 



To support the Journal of Architectural 
Education. 



For a special issue of the Journal of 
Architectural Education devoted to the 
social sciences. The aim was to empha- 
size the relationship between the teach- 
ing of social and psychological issues in \ 
architecture and in the design studio. 



To complete a report on current reforms 
in thirteen schools of architecture in 
France. A report entitled Architectural 
Education in France was produced. 



DESIGN EDUCATION AND PROFESSIONAL ADVANCEMENT 211 



Columbia University 

FY 1982 

$15,000 

22-4250-128 

Contact: Chairman, Historic 

Preservation, Columbia 

University, Box 20, Low 

Memorial Library, New 

York, NY 10027 



Council of Educators in 

Landscape Architecture 

FY 1978 

$20,000 

R80-42-I49 

Contact: President, Council 

of Educators in Landscape 

Architecture, Michigan 

Stale University, East 

Lansing. Ml 48824 



Design Foundation 

FY 1981 

$12,500 

12-4221-141 

Contact: Executive Director, 

The Design Foundation, 

6802 Poplar Place, Suite 

303, McLean, VA 22101 



Fitch, James Marston 

FY 1980 

$7,500 

01-4214-023 

Contact: Professor, Historic 

Preservation, Columbia 

University, 232 East Fifth 

Street, New York, NY 

10003 



Foundation for Interior 

Design Education Research 

FY 1981 

$15,000 

12-4221-142 

Contact: Chair, Standards 

Center, Foundation for 

Interior Design Education 

Research, 730 Fifth 

Avenue, New York, NY 

10019 



Foundation for Preservation 

Technology 

FY 1982 

$15,000 

22-4250-136 

Contact: Foundation for 

Preservation Technology, 

1511 K Street. N.W., Suite 

1005. Washington. DC 

20005 



To expand Columbia University's exist- 
ing program in architectural conserva- 
tion. The program was created in 1977. 



To produce workshops for educators in 
landscape architecture. A report on 
needs and opportunities in landscape ar- 
chitecture was produced. 



To prepare a pilot accreditation program 
for schools of industrial design. The 
project aimed to develop educational 
standards, to encourage self-evaluation 
by schools and to provide assistance to 
industrial design progrartis. A brief re- 
port was prepared. 



To organize a small working conference 
to investigate the possibility of establish- 
ing a consortium of American universi- 
ties that offer courses in historic pres- 
ervation. 



To undertake a study of the differences 
among two-, three- and four-year pro- 
grams of interior design education. A re- 
port on programs in the United States 
and Canada was produced. 



To plan a pilot program in architectural 
conservation. Testing of the model 
curriculum took place at the University 
of Florida School of Architecture. Nine 
programs and thirty-three courses were 
developed, and a 50-page report was is- 
sued. 



Georgia Tech Research 

Institute 

FY 1979 

$5,000 

92-4235-269 

Contact: Assistant to the 

Vice-President, Georgia 

Tech Research Institute, 

Administration Building, 

Atlanta, GA 30332 



Harvard University 

FY 1980 

$16,000 

02-4221-204 

Contact: Director, Career 

Discovery, Harvard 

University, 1350 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

Cambridge, MA 02138 



Iowa State University 

FY 1978 

$29,990 

R8a42-89 

Contact: Chairmen, Iowa 

State University, 

Department of 

Architecture, Ames, lA 

50011 



Landscape Architecture 

Foundation 

FY 1979 

$30,000 

92-4236-130 

Contact: Vice-President, 

Landscape Architecture 

Foundation, 1 750 Old 

Meadow Road, McLean, 

VA 22101 



Liebs, Chester H. 

FY 1982 

$10,000 

21-4213-098 

Contact: Director, Historic 

Preservation Program, 97 

Lakeview Terrace, 

Burlington, VT 05401 



Louisiana Tech University 
FY 1980 
$16,000 
02-4221-205 
Contact: Associate 
Professor, Louisiana Tech 
University, Box 62771, Tech 
Station, Ruston. LA 71272 



To develop an instructional module on 
compliance requirements arising from 
Section 504 of the 1973 Rehabilitation 
Act, with particular emphasis on the 
needs of persons with cognitive or per- 
ceptual difficulties. 



For the career discovery program of the 
Harvard Graduate School of Design. The 
program provides pre-college students, 
particularly women and minorities, with 
the opportunity to "try on" a career be- 
fore making a commitment in time, 
money and energy. A report. Career Dis- 
covery, 1980, was issued. 



For curriculum development for the Col- 
lege of Design at Iowa State University. 



To produce a task analysis of the profes- 
sional landscape architect. The aims 
were to strengthen licensing and curricu- 
lum accreditation procedures and iden- 
tify continuing educational needs. 



To document the work of the University 
of Vermont's historic preservation pro- 
gram. The program provides professional 
training and community education na- 
tionwide, while serving as a regional 
architectural heritage center. 



To develop a six-week summer program 
that provides pre-college students from 
the surrounding rural areas with an 
opportunity to explore the architectural 
profession. A 44-page report on the pro- 
gram was produced. 



212 CHAPTER FIVE 



Maryland Institute College 

of Art 

FY 1984 

$10,000 

42-4256-0051 

Contact: President, 

Maryland Institute College 

of Art, 1 300 Mount Royal 

Avenue, Baltimore, MD 

21217 



Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology 

FY 1980 

$31,745 

02^252-146 

Contact: Assistant Professor, 

Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology, 77 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

Cambridge, MA 02139 



National Architectural 

Accrediting Board 

FY 1977 

$12,500 

R70-42-180 

Contact: Executive Director, 

National Architectural 

Accrediting Board, 1735 

New York Avenue, N.W., 

Washington, DC 20006 



Nelson, Doreen 

FY 1984 

$10,000 

41-4213-0090 

Contact: 646 Kelton 

Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 

90024 



New England Municipal 

Center 

FY 1979 

$18,000 

92-4212-152 

Contact: Associate Director, 

New England Municipal 

Center, FO. Box L, 

Durham, NH 03824 



New York Landmarks 

Preservation Foundation 

FY 1981 

$17,500 

12^221-133 

Contact: Chairman, New 

York Landmarks 

Preservation Foundation, 

305 Broadway, New York, 

NY 10007 



For a one-day symposium, "Developing 
Design/Developing Designers." Six de- 
sign educators and six design profes- 
sionals discussed alternatives and options 
in graphic design today. A report, 
Graphic Design: Idea to Image, resulted. 



To prepare four case studies about en- 
ergy-conscious design for use in profes- 
sional schools and continuing education 
programs. The aim was to help students 
and teachers of architecture and design 
approach their work more creatively. A 
125-page report was prepared. 



To collect and organize information on 
architectural education to add to an ex- 
isting database on professional programs. 



To study the Design Education Depart- 
ment of the Royal College of Arts in the 
United Kingdom with the intent of creat- 
ing a similar teacher-training design cen- 
ter in the United States. 



For research and development of a dem- 
onstration educational training program 
for historic district commissions and de- 
sign review boards. A trainer's guide and 
course report were produced. 



To support development of a designer 
training program as a model for other 
historic preservation commissions. 



Olsen, Shirley A. 

FY 1983 

$15,000 

31-4215-00165 

Contact: Professor, 

Industrial Design, Ohio 

State University, 

Department of Industrial 

Design, 128 North Oval 

Mall, Columbus, OH 43210 



Pearce. Peter J. 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R71-42-56N 

Contact: 3838 Carpenter 

Avenue, Studio City, CA 

91604 



Pittsburgh Architects 
Workshop, Inc. 
FY 1985 
$29,000 
52-4256-0121 
Contact: President, 
Pittsburgh Architects 
Workshop, Inc., 237 
Oakland Avenue, 
Pittsburgh, PA 15213 



President and Fellows of 

Harvard University 

FY 1982 

$5,000 

22-4250-048 

Contact: Director, Special 

Programs, Harvard 

University, 1350 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

Cambridge, MA 02138 



Project for Public Spaces 

FY 1978 

$15,000 

R80-42-30 

Contact: President, Project 

for Public Spaces, 875 

Avenue of the Americas, 

New York, NY 10001 



Sculpture in the 

Environment, Inc. 

FY 1981 

$10,000 

1 2-4250-204 

Contact: Officer, Sculpture 

in the Environment, Inc. 

(SITE), 83 Spring Street, 

New York, NY 10012 



To develop a theoretical framework that 
can be used as a basis for improving the 
leaching of basic visual communication 
design concepts. Slides and descriptive 
material documented the project. 



To prepare a textbook for teaching three- 
dimensional design. The book. Experi- 
ments in Form: A Foundation Course in 
Three-Dimensional Design, was pub- 
lished by Van Nostrand Reinholt in 
1980. 



To conduct the Design/Build program. 
This program introduced high-school stu- 
dents to the design and construction of 
simple projects to help them acquire 
greater understanding of the built envi- 
ronment. 



For Harvard Graduate School of De- 
sign's program on career discovery. 



For an educational program on the use of 
observation research as a tool to plan de- 
sign improvements to public spaces. A 
training program was conducted and 
curriculum materials prepared. 



To prepare a "survival manual" for stu- 
dents and architects entering the profes- 
sion in the 1980s. Though architecture is 
undergoing a reevaluation as a public 
art, the most creative practitioners in the 
artist/architect category are experienc- 
ing increasing difficulty realizing 
projects. 



DESIGN EDUCATION AND PROFESSIONAL ADVANCEMENT 213 



Smith, C. Ray 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R71-42-46N 

Contact: 4\\ East 50th 

Street, New York, NY 

10022 



University of California, 

Berkeley 

FY 1978 

$22,890 

R80-42-I32 

Contact: University of 

California, Berkeley, M-1 1 

Wheeler Hall, Berkeley, CA 

94720 



University of New Mexico 
FY 1977 
$20,000 
R70-42-60 
Contact: Cod i rector, 
University of New Mexico, 
Center for Environmental 
Design Education, Box 603, 
Corrales, NM 87048 



University of Pennsylvania 
FY 1981 
$15,000 
12-4221-239 
Contact: Chairman, 
Department of Architecture, 
University of Pennsylvania, 
3541 Walnut Street, 
Philadelphia, PA 19104 



University of Texas 
FY 1980 
$16,000 
02-4221-210 
Contact: Director, 
University of Texas, 
Division of Continuing 
Education, Main Building 
2500, Austin, TX 78712 



University of Texas 

FY 1981 

$15,000 

12-4221-240 

Contact: Director, Summer 

Academy in Architecture, 

University of Texas, GOL 

102, Austin, TX 78712 



To write a textbook that explains the 
process of designing architecture and 
demonstrates it through the story of a 
single building. 



To prepare personalized, self-paced and 
self-guided instructional materials for the 
"Campus Course," a program to intro- 
duce environmental design to a wide 
spectrum of students and community 
members in the San Francisco Bay area. 



To establish a graduate design and devel- 
opment center at the University of New 
Mexico for training environmental design 
educators. The center's offerings in- 
cluded graduate studies in the design of 
school buildings, playgrounds and other 
facilities related to education. 



To develop a model program in historic 
preservation, designed not as a separate 
study, but integrated with the universi- 
ty's architecture program. 



For the Summer Academy in Architec- 
ture, a six-week program for high school 
students interested in the study of ar- 
chitecture. The program included field 
trips, lectures and design work. Special 
emphasis was placed on broadening the 
participation of minority and low-income 
students. 



To conduct the Summer Academy in Ar- 
chitecture, a six-week program for high 
school students interested in the study of 
architecture. 



University of Vermont 

FY 1977 

$15,000 

R70-42-174 

Contact: University of 

Vermont, Waterman 

Building, Burlington, VT 

05401 



Van Kempen, Gustaaf F. 

Brest 

FY 1986 

$10,000 

86-4213-0045 

Contact: 2624 Park Place, 

Evanston, I L 60201 



Western Dakota Vocational 

Technical School 

FY 1978 

$17,093 

R80-42-182 

Contact: Director, Western 

Dakota Vocational 

Technical School, Meade 

School District, 46-1, 

Sturgis, SD 57785 



For curriculum development for a gradu- 
ate program in historic preservation and 
improvement of the built environment at 
the University of Vermont. 



To document and evaluate the develop- 
ing university infrastructure in Algeria, 
and the contributions made to the system 
by non-Algerian architects and engineers. 
A report. The Algerian Experiment, was 
issued. 



To develop a preservation training pro- 
gram for Western Dakota Vocational 
Technical School. The aim was to leach 
skills necessary to obtain employment as 
a preservation technician. 



Resource Centers and Technical Assistance 



Arts Midwest 

FY 1987 

$15,000 

87-4241-0088 

Contact: Arts Midwest, 528 

Hennepin Avenue, Suite 

310, Minneapolis, MN 

55403 



American Institute of 

Architects Foundation 

FY 1978 

$25,780 

R8(M2-I81 

Contact: Executive Director, 

American Institute of 

Architects Foundation, 1735 

New York Avenue, N.W.. 

Washington, DC 20006 



To conduct a survey to determine the 
state of the design arts fields in Illinois, 
Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, 
North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota and 
Wisconsin as the first step toward estab- 
lishing regional design arts programming 
and state design arts programs. 



To inventory the American Institute of 
Architects' architectural archival materi- 
als and records and to provide stabiliza- 
tion and in some cases, emergency con- 
servation. 



214 CHAPTER FIVE 



American Institute of 

Architects Foundation 

FY 1980 

$28,500 

02^251-006 

Contact: Director, American 

Institute of Architects 

Foundation, 1 799 New York 

Avenue, N.W., Washington, 

DC 20006 



American Institute of 

Graphic Arts 

FY 1979 

$26,000 

92^236-161 

Contact: Assistant Director, 

American Institute of 

Graphic Arts, 1059 Third 

Avenue, New York, NY 

10021 



American Institute of 

Planners Foundation 

FY 1978 

$14,000 

R80-42-111 

Contact: President, 

American Institute of 

Planners Foundation, 1776 

Massachusetts Avenue, 

N.W., Washington, DC 

20036 



Armstrong, Alma C. 
FY 1982 
$10,000 
21-4213-167 
Contact: Community 
Planner, Department of 
Housing and Urban 
Development, 151 Tremont 
Street, Boston, MA 02111 



Biegel, Steven L. 

FY 1977 

$8,500 

R7I-42-39N 

Contact: 443 Ellis Street, 

Syracuse, NY 13210 



Bruce, Michael 

FY 1979 

$6,000 

PC 79-21 

Contact: 439 East Luray 

Avenue, Alexandria, VA 

22301 



For an inventory and catalogue of the 
Richard Morris Hunt architectural ar- 
chive at the American Institute of Archi- 
tects Foundation. 



To assist in development of an examina- 
tion procedure for federal government 
jobs in graphic design, photography and 
illustration. Two amendments were 
made: grant number 92-4236-161 for 
$6,000 in 1979, and 02-4221-903 for 
$9,000 in 1980. 



For negotiations necessary to establish a 
single national planning organization 
through merger of the American Insti- 
tute of Planners and the American Soci- 
ety of Planning Officials. 



To undertake a survey of black women in 
the planning profession. The survey iden- 
tified students as well as women already 
in the profession in order to begin devel- 
oping a support network and a national 
caucus within the American Planning 
Association. 



To document the contents of the archive 
of contemporary architects at the Ernest 
Stephensen Byrd Library at Syracuse 
University. 



To provide audiovisual documentation, 
maintenance, and production services in 
support of Design Excellence initiatives. 



Bruce, Michael 

FY 1981 

$43,000 

PC 81-4 

Contact: 439 East Luray 

Avenue. Alexandria, VA 

22301 



Center for Design 

FY 1980 

$20,000 

02-4221-209 

Contact: San Francisco, CA 

94102 



Committee for the 
Preservation of 
Architectural Records 
FY 1980 
$14,470 
02^221-075 

Contact: Executive Director, 
Committee for the 
Preservation of 
Architectural Records, 15 
Gramercy Park South, New 
York, NY 10003 



Community Design 

Exchange 

FY 1984 

$146,394 

NEA DCA 84-9 

Contact: Community Design 

Exchange, 1346 

Connecticut Avenue, NW, 

Suite 1009, Washington, 

DC 20036 



Community Design 

Exchange 

FY 1987 

$142,978 

NEA DCA 87-26 

Contact: President, 

Community Design 

Exchange, 1428 Duke 

Street, Alexandria, VA 

22314 



Cooper Union for the 

Advancement of Science 

and Art 

FY 1979 

$30,000 

924212-155 

Contact: Dean, School of 

Art, Cooper Union for the 

Advancement of Science 

and Art, Cooper Square, 

New York, NY 10003 



To assist the Design Excellence Program 
(sponsored by the Design Arts Program) 
by creating audiovisual programs appris- 
ing constituents of the issues affecting 
their fields. 



To support the activities of the Center 
for Design. The center's services include 
educational programs for designers and 
the public, design exhibitions, a design 
reference library, job referrals for design- 
ers and a design newsletter. 



To ensure proper transfer of all of the 
committee's files and services to the Li- 
brary of Congress Prints and Photo- 
graphs Division. 



To plan and implement the Presidential 
Design Awards program, which recog- 
nizes exemplary achievements in federal 
design in the fields of architecture, land- 
scape architecture, engineering design, 
graphic design, interior design, product/ 
industrial design and urban design and 
planning. 



To conduct the second round of the 
Presidential Design Awards program in 
connection with the Design Arts Pro- 
gram. 



To establish a design center focusing on 
research and advanced studies in the de- 
sign arts fields. 



DESIGN EDUCATION AND PROFESSIONAL ADVANCEMENT 215 



Design Communication, Inc. 
FY 1985 
$29,967 

NBA DCA 85-46 
Contact: President, Design 
Communication, Inc., 1346 
Connecticut Avenue, N.W., 
Washington, DC 20036 



Eberhard, John R 

FY 1979 

$9,500 

91-4232-273 

Co/Kacr- 8211 Stone Trail 

Drive, Bethesda, MD 20034 



Environmental Images 
FY 1984 
$90,000 

NBA DCA 84-73 
Contact: Vice-President, 
Environmental Images, 
1346 Connecticut Avenue, 
NW, Suite 325, 
Washington, DC 20036 



Environmental Images 
FY 1985 
$40,000 

NBA DCA 85-49 
Contact: President, 
Environmental Images, 
1 346 Connecticut Avenue, 
N.W., Suite 325, 
Washington, DC 20036 



Environmental Images 
FY 1986 
$80,000 

NBA DCA 86-37 
Contact: President, 
Environmental Images, 300 
I Street, N.E., Suite 101, 
Washington, DC 20002 



Environmental Images 
FY 1987 
$98,634 

NBA DCA 87-37 
Contact: President, 
Environmental Images, 300 
I Street, N.E., Suite 101, 
Washington, DC 20002 



To administer the Presidential Design 
Awards Program. 



To acquaint students in university design 
programs with career opportunities in 
federal government agencies. A report, A 
Guide to the Federal Government for 
Design and Building Professionals, was 
prepared. 



To perform these services for the Design 
Arts Program: managing a consultants' 
network to conduct site visits to Endow- 
ment grantees and applicants, providing 
technical assistance to design compe- 
tition sponsors and furnishing informa- 
tion about public and private funding 
and program opportunities to those in the 
design fields. 



To conduct research into design arts pro- 
grams at the state level and to compile a 
case-study book of model projects. 



To manage a design consultants' network 
that provides assistance to grantees and 
grant applicants, offers competition man- 
agement advice and gives information on 
funding and program opportunities. 



To schedule, administer and manage a 
network of design consultants in coopera- 
tion with the Design Arts Program. 



Friends of the Schindler 

House 

FY 1979 

$15,393 

92-4211-219 

Contact: Vice-President, 

Friends of the Schindler 

House, 833 North Kings 

Road, Los Angeles, CA 

90060 



Garfinkle, Robert 

FY 1981 

$4,481 

C81-18 

Contact: 7420 West Lake 

Terrace, Apt. 1 307, 

Bethesda, MA 20817 



Innovative Design Fund, 

Inc. 

FY 1981 

$20,000 

12-4250-198 

Contact: President, 

Innovative Design Fund, 

Inc., 866 United Nations 

Plaza, Room 401, New 

York, NY 10017 



Institute for Urban Design 

FY 1981 

$25,000 

12-4221-146 

Contact: Director, Institute 

for Urban Design, State 

University of New York at 

Purchase, Main RO. Box 

105, Purchase, NY 10577 



Institute for Urban Design 

FY 1982 

$19,500 

22-4254-161 

Contact: Director, Institute 

for Urban Design, State 

University of New York at 

Purchase, Main PO. Box 

105, Purchase, NY 10577 



Institute for Urban Design 

FY 1986 

$29,700 

86-4251-0002 

Contact: Director, Institute 

for Urban Design, PO. Box 

105, Purchase, NY 10577 



To plan and design the adaptive reuse of 
the R. M. Schindler Kings Road House 
as a center for the study of twentieth- 
century architecture in Los Angeles. 



To assist the planning and administration 
of the Department of Transportation De- 
sign Awards Program and other initia- 
tives of the Design Excellence Program. 



To design and produce brochures, posters 
and other printed materials to develop 
support for the Innovative Design Fund 
and to reach prospective grant appli- 
cants. A report, The Beginning Is the 
Most Important Part of the Work, was 
produced. 



For the operations of the Institute for 
Urban Design, a national organization 
devoted exclusively to the advancement 
of urban design. The institute's publica- 
tion. Urban Design International, and an- 
nual international conference work to im- 
prove the general understanding of urban 
design issues and processes. 



To assist the private sector in selecting 
evaluators of candidates applying for fed- 
eral government jobs in architecture, 
landscape architecture and interior de- 
sign. 



To supplement government peer panels 
with private sector design professionals. 
The panels review and evaluate the port- 
folios received by the Office of Personnel 
Management from designers seeking jobs 
within the federal government. 



216 CHAPTER FIVE 



Landscape Architecture 

Foundation 

FY 1983 

$18,000 

32-4250-00037 

Contact: Project Director, 

Landscape Architecture 

Foundation, 1733 

Connecticut Avenue, N.W., 

Washington, DC 20009 



Landscape Architecture 

Foundation 

FY 1986 

$20,000 

86-4256-0030 

Contact: President, 

Landscape Architecture 

Foundation, 1733 

Connecticut Avenue, N.W., 

Washington, DC 20009 



Massachusetts College of 

Art/Design Management 

Institute 

FY 1980 

$20,000 

02-4221-206 

Contact: Director, Design 

Management Institute, 364 

Brookline Avenue, Boston, 

MA 02215 



Minneapolis Society of Fine 

Arts 

FY 1986 

$40,000 

86-4252-0130 

Contact: Vice-President, 

Minneapolis Society of Fine 

Arts, 2400 Third Avenue 

South, Minneapolis, MN 

55404 



McCleary, Peter 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R71-42-20N 

Contact: 531 Spruce Street, 

Phildelphia, PA 19106 



National Center for 

Preservation Law 

FY 1978 

$7,000 

R8a42-I29 

Contact: President, National 

Center for Preservation 

Law, 295 Madison Avenue, 

New York, NY 10017 



To create a landscape architecture in- 
formation clearinghouse in order to dis- 
seminate the large and growing body of 
information on landscape architecture to 
practitioners across the nation. 



To hire a staff person to enable the foun- 
dation's Research and Information Clear- 
inghouse to enlarge its database from 
25,000 to 100,000 entries. The expansion 
has come about in response to the rapid 
pace of developments in landscape ar- 
chitecture and research and practice. 



To support the activities of the Design 
Management Institute. The institute dis- 
seminates information on design manage- 
ment techniques used by design groups 
in both private corporations and the pub- 
lic sector. 



For phase one of Design Wise, a pro- 
gram to establish a national design edu- 
cation research center and to promote in- 
clusion of design programs at the 
secondary school level. 



To establish an institute for the study of 
the art and science of building in ar- 
chitecture. A report identified an appro- 
priate organizational framework and the 
types of studies and research to be con- 
ducted. 



To determine the feasibility of creating a 
national center for preservation law, an 
organization that would consolidate the 
best available thinking on the legal issues 
confronting preservation professionals. 



Parsons School of Design 
FY 1984 
$20,000 
42-4256-0014 
Contact: Chairman, 
Environmental Design 
Department, Parsons School 
of Design, 66 Fifth Avenue, 
New York, NY 10011 



Partners for Livable Places 

FY 1978 

$100,000 

PC 78-47 

Contact: President, Partners 

for Livable Places, 1429 

21st Street, N.W., 

Washington, DC 20036 



Partners for Livable Places 

FY 1979 

$40,000 

PC 79-18 

Contact: President, Partners 

for Livable Places, 1429 21st 

Street, N.W., Washington, 

DC 20036 



Partners for Livable Places 

FY 1980 

$42,500 

CA 80-29 

Contact: President, Partners 

for Livable Places, 1429 21st 

Street, N.W, Washington, 

DC 20036 



Partners for Livable Places 

FY 1981 

$98,350 

CA 81-14 

Contact: President, Partners 

for Livable Places, 1429 

21st Street, N.W., 

Washington, DC 20036 



Partners for Livable Places 

FY 1981 

$198,150 

22-4253-005 

Contact: Associate Director, 

Partners for Livable Places, 

1429 21st Street, N.W., 

Washington, DC 20036 



To develop a Design Research Institute 
within the International Design Center to 
serve as a resource for the fields of land- 
scape architecture, interior design, furni- 
ture design, industrial design, urban 
planning, engineering, energy conserva- 
tion technology and lighting design. 



To create a built environment clearing- 
house. The clearinghouse includes in- 
formation on grants awarded by the Na- 
tional Endowment for the Arts' 
Architecture, Planning and Design Pro- 
gram (now the Design Arts Program). 
An amendment was made in 1979 to ex- 
plore the feasibility of a design critics' 
network. A publication entitled How 
Small Grants Make a Difference was 
also produced. 



To support the Livability Clearinghouse 
and these projects: developing a mecha- 
nism to evaluate design advocacy 
projects, reviewing significant design 
projects funded by the Arts Endowment 
and finding ways to improve communica- 
tion between the design professions and 
the government. 



To maintain the Livability Clearing- 
house, to publish sourcebooks on design 
and to publish a digest of significant 
developments in the design disciplines. 



To maintain and expand the Livability 
Clearinghouse and to develop informa- 
tion dissemination services for the Design 
Excellence Project. An amendment was 
made to host a seminar and workshops 
and to provide information services in 
connection with the "Arts Edge" confer- 
ence. 



To maintain a built environment clear- 
inghouse, to provide administrative sup- 
port for and publish the proceedings of 
the national conference "Settings for the 
Arts; A Competitive Edge in City Eco- 
nomics" and to issue seven digests focus- 
ing on significant development in the de- 
sign disciplines. 



DESIGN EDUCATION AND PROFESSIONAL ADVANCEMENT 217 



Partners for Livable Places 

FY 1982 

$290,000 

DCA 82-12 

Contact: President, Partners 

for Livable Places, 1429 

21st Street, N.W., 

Washington, DC 20036 



Partners for Livable Places 

FY 1983 

$308,570 

DCA 83-17 

Contact: President, Partners 

for Livable Places, 1429 

21st Street, N.W., 

Washington, DC 20036 



Partners for Livable Places 

FY 1984 

$165,000 

NEA DCA 84-47 

Contact: Director, Livabillty 

Clearinghouse, Partners for 

Livable Places, 1429 21st 

Street, N.W., Washington, 

DC 20036 



Partners for Livable Places 
FY 1985 
$200,000 
NEA DCA 85-29 
Contact: President, Partners 
for Livable Places, 1429 
21st Street, N.W, 
Washington, DC 20036 



Partners for Livable Places 
FY 1986 
$47,986 

NEA DCA 86-18 
Contact: President, Partners 
for Livable Places, 1429 
21st Street, N.W., 
Washington, DC 20036 



Partners for Livable Places 
FY 1986 
$240,000 
NEA DCA 86-20 
Contact: President, Partners 
for Livable Places, 1429 
21st Street, N.W., 
Washington, DC 20036 



To maintain and improve the National 
Clearinghouse on Design and the Na- 
tional Consultants' Network as part of an 
economics of amenity advocacy effort to 
arts organizations. 



To provide support for the Livability 
Clearinghouse, the Economics of Ameni- 
ties Program, a research project showcas- 
ing the role local leadership and public/ 
private partnerships can play in improv- 
ing the quality of design and for manage- 
ment of a national network of design pro- 
fessionals for the review and evaluation 
of Arts Endowment projects. 



For continued maintenance of the Liv- 
ability Clearinghouse. 



To continue the operations of the Liv- 
ability Clearinghouse. 



To develop and implement a design in- 
formation network to facilitate communi- 
cations among the numerous design orga- 
nizations. 



To continue operation of the Livability 
Clearinghouse, which provides public in- 
formation services on grants awarded by 
the Design Arts Program, and to perform 
research on arts information centers and 
government-funded clearinghouses as the 
basis for a five-year plan for the clearing- 
house. 



Partners for Livable Places 
FY 1986 
$40,000 

NEA DCA 86-20.1 
Contact: President, Partners 
for Livable Places, 1429 
21st Street, N.W, 
Washington, DC 20036 



Partners for Livable Places 
FY 1987 
$225,000 
NEA DCA 87-23 
Contact: President, Partners 
for Livable Places, 1429 
21st Street, N.W., 
Washington, DC 20036 



Rambusch, Catha C. 

FY 1981 

$8,500 

11-4213-102 

Contact: 430 East 20th 

Street, New York, NY 

10009 



Research Foundation of the 

City University of New 

York 

FY 1979 

$15,000 

92-4211-255 

Contact: Vice-President, 

Administration, Research 

Foundation of the City 

University of New York, 

1515 Broadway, New York, 

NY 10031 



Sculpture in the 

Environment., Inc. (SITE) 

FY 1984 

$30,000 

42-4256-00009 

Contact: 83 Spring Street, 

New York, NY 10012 



Trustees of Columbia 

University 

FY 1978 

$15,000 

R80-42-I47 

Contact: Trustees of 

Columbia University, 

Columbia University, New 

York, NY 10027 



To undertake two research projects: a 
survey of the emerging issues in design 
and a survey of the organizations in- 
volved in the planning of the 
Quincentenary of Columbus's landfall in 
the New World. 



For operation and enhancement of the 
Livability Clearinghouse, a computerized 
library of abstracts documenting thou- 
sands of design projects conducted in 
large and small communities throughout 
America. The Clearinghouse also in- 
cludes abstracts of all grants given by 
the Design Arts Program and the final 
reports submitted by grantees. 



For preparatory research to establish an 
independent study center for American 
architecture at Columbia University. A 
feasibility study report was published. 



To undertake a feasibility study for the 
restoration and conversion of historic 
Shepard Hall into a modern facility for 
the school of architecture of the City 
University of New York. 



For a development program to help 
SITE achieve greater self-sufficiency. 



To establish an information center for 
preservation planning. Its goals were to 
gather, evaluate and disseminate in- 
formation on historic neighborhood pres- 
ervation projects in the United States. 



218 CHAPTER FIVE 



Trustees of the University of 

Pennsylvania 

FY 1979 

$30,000 

92^212-154 

Contact: 34th and Walnut 

Streets, Philadelphia, PA 

19104 



Tuskegee Institute 

FY 1977 

$10,000 

R70-42-57 

Contact: Tuskegee Institute, 

Tuskegee, AL 36088 



Villecco, Marguerite 

FY 1982 

$72,500 

DCA 82-8 

Contact: 434 1 5th Street, 

NE, Washington, DC 20003 



Ward, Robertson 

FY 1981 

$10,000 

11-4213-178 

Contact: 2\ West Elm 

Street, Chicago, I L 60610 



Wellington, Margot 
FY 1983 
$10,000 
31-4213-00169 
Contact: 211 East 70th 
Street, Apt. 19A, New 
York, NY 10021 



For curatorial organization of the Louis 
Kahn archive at the University of Penn- 
sylvania. 



To conduct research necessary to estab- 
lish an institute of Afro-American ar- 
chitecture. The research included a semi- 
nar and panel discussions, and a working 
proposal was produced. 



To provide research and planning ser- 
vices to selected Arts Endowment pro- 
grams and to create presentations that 
pertain to issues of design inquiry, eval- 
uation, process and communications. 



To organize and inventory the drawings 
and records of Konrad Wachsmann, an 
industrialized builder. A directory, The 
Complete Project Works of Konrad 
Wachsmann, was produced on microfilm. 



To study New York City's Urban Center 
with the aim of determining the role ur- 
ban centers play in the enhancement of 
environmental design awareness in urban 
areas. 



Computer Applications 



Architectural Research 
Centers Consortium 
FY 1983 
$18,815 
32-425^00097 
Contact: 1735 New York 
Avenue, N.W., Washington, 
DC 20006 



To develop a designers' computer soft- 
ware exchange program by bringing to- 
gether design schools, researchers, soft- 
ware developers and designers. 



Center for Cultural and 

Technical Interchange 

Between East and West 

FY 1980 

$25,539 

02-4252-145 

Contact: \111 East West 

Road, Honolulu, HI 96848 



Cooper Union Research 

Foundation 

FY 1985 

$40,000 

52-4252-0172 

Contact: Cooper Square, 

New York, NY 100003 



Cornell University 

FY 1986 

$20,000 

86-4252-0058 

Contact: Associate Director, 

Cornell University, Day 

Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 



Forbes, Bruce 

FY 1981 

$5,000 

11-4212-113 

Contact: 1 16 Richards Hall, 

Harvard University, 

Cambridge, MA 02138 



Fund for Philadelphia, Inc. 

FY 1987 

$25,000 

87-4251-0118 

Contact: City Hall Annex, 

1 3th Floor, Market and 

Juniper Streets, 

Philadelphia, PA 19107 



Hennessey, James M. 

FY 1980 

$9,000 

01-4213-167 

Contact: 27 Locust Street, 

Honeoye Falls, NY 14472 



Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology 

FY 1986 

$38,500 

86-4252-0132 

Contact: M.I.T., 77 

Massachusetts Ave., 

Cambridge, MA 02139 



Miller, Myron 

FY 1984 

$10,000 

41-4213-0140 

Contact: 1 06 Sumner Road, 

Brookline, MA 02146 



To construct an experimental graphic 
language that could translate unwieldy 
amounts of computer code into simple el- 
egant forms. 



To conduct research on computer pro- 
grams capable of producing high-quality 
visual images that designers can manipu- 
late on-screen during the creative design 
process. 



To develop a primer and computer mod- 
els on the design and application of 
architectural "grammars," the bodies of 
elements and principles that govern the 
design of buildings belonging to a par- 
ticular architectural style. 



To produce a design manual entitled 
Guidelines for a Computer-Aided Archi- 
tectural Practice. 



To develop specific design controls as 
part of a new zoning code governing 
high-density development. In conjunction 
with the University of Pennsylvania, a 
three-dimensional computer model has 
been developed and is in use. 



To document how computers are used in 
the education of the designer. A video- 
tape was produced that shows how seven 
design schools use microcomputers and 
the kinds of equipment and programs 
they use. 



To produce a videodisc that conveys key 
design aspects — history, landscape and 
architecture — of a Boston suburban J 

development. The aims were to fill a void \ 
in information on the growth of the 
American suburb and to supplement in- 
structional methods. 



To develop a microcomputer program for 
architectural design by adapting space- 
planning programming used on main- 
frame computers. 



DESIGN EDUCATION AND PROFESSIONAL ADVANCEMENT 219 



New York City Landmarks 

Preservation Commission 

FY 1981 

$25,000 

12-4250-034 

Conlaci: 305 Broadway, 

New York, NY 10007 



President and Fellows of 
Harvard College 
FY 1985 
$30,000 
52-4231-0022 
Contact : 1350 
Massachusetts Avenue, 
Fourth Floor, Cambridge, 
MA 02138 



President and Fellows of 
Harvard College 
FY 1985 
$40,000 
52-4252-0070 
Contact: 1350 
Massachusetts Avenue, 
Cambridge, MA 02138 



Research Foundation of the 

State University of New 

York 

FY 1984 

$35,025 

42-4252-0107 

Contact: RO. Box 9, 

Albany, NY 12201 



Rochester Institute of 

Technology 

FY 1986 

$30,000 

86-4256-0007 

Contact: One Lomb 

Memorial Drive, Rochester, 

NY 14623 



Rochester Institute of 

Technology 

FY 1987 

$20,000 

87^251-0026 

Contact: One Lomb 

Memorial Drive, Rochester, 

NY 14623 



Society of Architectural 

Historians 

FY 1977 

$7,890 

R7042-56 

Contact: 1700 Walnut 

Street, Philadelphia, PA 

19103 



To create a program that would intro- 
duce a graphic element into the New 
York City Urban Cultural Resources 
Survey, a fully computerized building- 
by-building architectural inventory of 
each property in the City of New York. 



To develop a pilot study for computer- 
aided simulations of designs using herba- 
ceous perennials. The purpose was to 
document and digitize a palette of these 
plants as they change through time. 



To support the Laboratory for Computer 
Graphics' development of an interactive, 
three-dimensional computer modeling 
system. The system aids architects, land- 
scape architects and sculptors in the de- 
sign and visualization of form. 



To develop a computer system that 
would allow an inexperienced user to de- 
velop the initial schematic design for a 
single-family house on a specific site. A 
research report documented the project. 



To develop a videodisc archive on the 
history of graphic design. The videodisc 
format would permit quick accesss to 
great quantities of visual material and re- 
quire little storage space or managerial 
personnel. 



To continue preserving important materi- 
als documenting the history of graphic 
design on videodisc. The focus of this 
phase was the work of the European 
avant-garde artists and the American 
graphic design pioneers of the 1 930s and 
1940s. 



To compile an index covering the thirty- 
six years of the Journal of the Society of 
Architectural Historians and to incorpo- 
rate the index into a computer data 
bank. 



Society of Architectural 

Historians 

FY 1979 

$10,210 

92-4212-054 

Contact: 1 700 Walnut 

Street, Philadelphia, PA 

19103 



Southern Illinois Research 

Institute 

FY 1982 

$25,000 

22-4250-238 

Contact: 2\65 156th 

Avenue, S.E., Bellevue, WA 

98007 



Rubin, Morissa R. 

FY 1986 

$4,000 

86-4213-0111 

Contact: 4 Ayr Road, Apt. 

25, Brighton, MA 02146 



Visual Resources 

Association 

FY 1986 

$25,000 

86-4256-0079 

Contact: 1 837 East Shelby, 

Seattle, WA 981 12 



To prepare abstracts from the Journal of 
Architectural History for entry into a 
computer for national distribution. The 
complete database was included in the 
on-line system of Bibliographical Re- 
trieval Services of Latham, New York. 



To generate and publish human-figure 
computer graphics. The aim was to assist 
designers in solving problems of human 
scale in building and other designs. Re- 
sults included human-figure graphics 
programs and a study report. 



To develop design guidelines that aid in 
the design and transfer of visual informa- 
tion from print to computer screen and 
vice versa. The aim was to identify the 
special requirements of each media. 



To create a visual resource library con- 
sisting of some 2,000 slides and a 
videodisc on contemporary design. 




6 




Presidential Design 
Awards and 
Federal Design 
Achievement Awards 



,A 



The New Sunshine Skyway 
Bridge across Tampa Bay is an 
engineering landmark. Cables 
support the center of the road- 
bed, rather than the outer 
edges, and give the bridge a 
thin, elegant silhouette. 



"Inspired design, the genius that makes ordinary things work 
well and look beautiful, is possible from within the federal 
ranks," said President Ronald Reagan when he presented the 
first Presidential Design Awards in January 1984. 

The Presidential Design Awards Program is the first gov- 
ernment-wide effort to recognize and foster excellence in fed- 
eral design work. It was established in 1983 to honor exem- 
plary achievement in federal design in architecture, landscape 
architecture, urban design and planning, interior design, engi- 
neering design, graphic design and industrial design. The 
project is administered by the National Endowment for the 
Arts as part of its Federal Design Improvement Program. 

The awards have been presented twice — in 1984 and in 
1988 — and are expected to continue in each presidential 
term. Two kinds of awards are given — Federal Design 
Achievement Awards and Presidential Design Awards. A 
jury of eminent designers first selects the winners of the Fed- 
eral Design Achievement Awards. From this list, which al- 
ready represents the government's best designs, another jury 
then selects the most outstanding work to be honored with 
Presidential Design Awards. In 1984 juries chose ninety-one 
Federal Design Achievement Award winners and thirteen 
Presidential Design Award winners. In 1988 juries selected 
sixty-eight Federal Design Achievement Award winners and 
ten Presidential Design Award winners. 

It is appropriate that the federal government focus on de- 
sign excellence, for the government is the nation's largest 
builder, printer and user of design services. It spends billions 
of dollars annually for design products ranging from stamps 
and housing to floodways and parks. The quality of this invest- 
ment directly affects the lives of every citizen. It also mirrors 
our national standards and values. 

As Dr. Frank Stanton, chairman of the second Presidential 
Design Awards jury, said, "There was a time when 'made in 
the U.S.' stood for excellence and quality. Design helped give 
the U.S. its competitive edge." Dr. Stanton saw the Presiden- 
tial Design Awards Program as a way of "encouraging quality 
in design as a means to regain America's competitive posi- 
tion." 

The awards have gone to a variety of projects. They honor 
projects to improve safety, such as the Army's combat hel- 
met, the Bureau of Mines's research on safer mine roof struc- 



222 CHAPTER SIX 




Between Continents/ Between 
Seas: Pre-Columbian Art of 
Costa Rica, was one of fifteen 
excellent exhibitions for which 
the National Gallery of Art re- 
ceived a Federal Design 
Achievement Award in 1 984. 



tures, and the Department of Transportation's "enriched in- 
formation" signs that give motorists additional information at 
dangerous locations. Some awards honor design for special 
groups: the Veterans Administration's prosthetic foot that 
enables amputees to run, its handbike that enables persons 
with lower-limb disabilities to bicycle; Charleston's scattered 
infill housing program that provides attractive homes for low- 
income groups; the skillful adaptation of the James Steam 
Mill into housing for the elderly, a Department of Housing 
and Urban Development project in Newburyport, Massachu- 
setts. Some awards went to enterprises of vast scale: the St. 
Louis Flood Protection Project safeguards 3,100 acres of land 
by means of eleven miles of floodwalls and levees and twenty- 
eight pumping stations, a project that took seventeen years to 
complete; the Department of the Interior's Boxley Valley 
Land Use Plan will preserve a beautiful landscape of hills, 
forests and fields along the Buffalo National River in Arkan- 
sas. Other award-winners are book-size: graphic standards 
manuals that have improved the appearance and lowered the 
cost of publications in a dozen or more agencies; and books 
themselves — from the Department of Education's sparkling 
What Works?, a sixty-five-page compendium of the wit and 
wisdom of good teachers, to the Government Printing Office's 
monumental series. The U.S. Air Service in World War I. 

If there is a trend here — beyond design excellence — it is 
respect for the environment, both urban and rural. This re- 
spect is evident in the preservation of historic landmarks (such 
as the adaptive use of Nashville's Union Station); the design 
of a campground that scarcely intrudes upon the natural envi- 
ronment (Buffalo Point Campground, Arkansas); a cemetery 
that keeps most of the area as a natural unspoiled space 
(National Cemetery at Fort Custer, Michigan); a pumping 
station that not only resolves tidal and river flooding but 
generates upstream recreational and wildlife areas (Charles 
River Project in Boston); systems that enable an agency to 
visualize in advance how a proposed change would affect the 
environment (Forest Service's Visual Management System). 
Such respect is especially evident in the Liim Cove Viaduct, 
where engineers, to protect the forest land and wildlife, used a 
construction method that required no construction equipment 
on the ground. 

All of the projects on the following pages represent out- 
standing design. They also show what can happen when tal- 
ented designers collaborate with able administrators who have 
the vision to understand and demand the best in design. Each 
project does something of value for the community; taken 
together, they aflRrm the ability of the federal government to 
exercise leadership in achieving design excellence. 



PRESIDENTIAL DESIGN AWARDS 223 



1984 Presidential Design Awards 



General Services 
Administration 
Washington, D.C. 



National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration 
Washington, DC. 



U.S. Army Corps of 

Engineers 

New England Division 

Boston, Massachusetts 



U.S. Department of 
Housing and Urban 
Development 
Washington, D.C. 



U.S. Department of 
Housing and Urban 
Development 
Atlanta Regional Office 
Atlanta, Georgia 



U.S. Department of 

Housing and Urban 

Development 

San Francisco Regional 

Office 

San Francisco, Califomia 



U.S. Department of the 

Interior 

National Park Service 

Washington, D.C. 



For the Art-in-Architecture Program, 
which provides works of art for federal 
facilities as an integral part of the archi- 
tectural design. 



For the visual communications system, 
which gives NASA a strong individual 
identity, and for two dramatic poster se- 
ries. Going to Work in Space and Voy- 
ager at Saturn. 



For the Charles River Project, a dam 
and pumping station that resolves tidal 
and river flooding, protects wildlife and 
extends Boston's system of connected 
parks and walkways. 



For the New Partnership for restoring 
American Cities, an urban-design pro- 
gram established by the Lowertown Re- 
development Corporation. The program 
helped turn Lowertown, a section of 
downtown St. Paul, Minnesota, from a 
deteriorating warehouse section into a 
lively new community. 



For the Scattered Infill Public Housing 
Program in Charleston, South Carolina. 
The housing, skillfully designed so that it 
blends in with the neighborhood, does 
not resemble public housing. It has stim- 
ulated private investment and rehabilita- 
tion. 



For The Gardens, a residential complex 
of 186 apartments that has become a 
model of low-rise, high-density housing 
that is sensitive to the terrain. 



For the Unigrid Design Program, which 
brought uniformity and quality to the 
agency's communications. The system in- 
tegrates information, maps and visual 
materials in a structured framework that 
establishes a national identity for the 
agency. 



U.S. Department of the 

Interior 

National Park Service 

Washington, D.C. 



U.S. Department of the 

Interior 

National Park Service 

Washington, D.C. 



U.S. Department of the 

Interior 

Denver Service Center with 

the Federal Highway 

Administration of the U.S. 

Department of 

Transportation 



U.S. Department of 
Transportation 
Washington, D.C. 



For the Historic Preservation Tax Incen- 
tives Program, passed by the Congress in 
1978. As a result of the program and 
through the development and application 
of the Secretary of the Interior's Stan- 
dards for Rehabilitation, more than 
9,000 historic buildings nationwide were 
rehabilitated. 



For Franklin Court, an inventive monu- 
ment to Benjamin Franklin in Philadel- 
phia. The full-sized framework of his 
house and workshop in the landscaped 
courtyard evokes, rather than recon- 
structs, history. A museum and interpre- 
tative center are placed underground in 
order to leave the maximum amount of 
space for public use. 



For Linn Cove Viaduct, the final link in 
the 469-mile Blue Ridge Parkway. To 
protect the environment, a relatively new 
construction method, which required no 
construction equipment on the ground, 
was used to build this 1,243-mile stretch 
of road over a rugged terrain of excep- 
tional beauty. 



For a coherent system of transportation- 
related symbols signs now in use in air- 
ports, train stations and bus terminals 
throughout the United States. These 
were developed between 1974 and 1979 
with the assistance of the American In- 
stitute of Graphic Arts. 




Franklin Court in Philadelphia aims to evoke, not to reconstruct 
history. The court is dominated by a full-sized framework of 
Franklin's home; an interpretive center is underground. 



224 CHAPTER SIX 



U.S. Department of 
Transportation 
Federal Highway 
Administration 
Washington, D.C. 



U.S. Department of 
Transportation 
Federal Highway 
Administration, 
Washington, D.C, with the 
Denver Service Center of 
the U.S. Department of the 
Interior 



Veterans Administration 
Rehabilitation Research and 
Development Center 
Washington, D.C. 



For Intercity Bridge, which connects the 
cities of Pasco and Kennewick in the 
state of Washington. The engineers intro- 
duced a technique never used in the 
United States in designing this half-mile 
crossing of the Columbia River. 



For the Linn Cove Viaduct. See U.S. 
Department of the Interior, Denver Ser- 
vice Center. 



For the Seattle Foot, a prosthetic device 
of great simplicity, high efficiency, and 
modest cost that opens up such activities 
as running and ball-playing to lower-leg 
amputees. 



1984 Federal Design Achievement Awards 



American Revolution 
Bicentennial Administration 
Washington, D.C. 



Farm Credit Administration 
Washington, D.C. 



General Services 
Administration 
Washington, D.C. 



National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration 
Jet Propulsion Laboratory 
Pasadena, California 



For the official symbol of the Bicenten- 
nial, an effective unifying identification 
theme for the Bicentennial's various 
projects. 



For the Farm Credit Banks Report to 
Investors, 1980 and 1982, which con- 
tained some of the most sophisticated 
graphic design in the federal establish- 
ment. 



For the National Air and Space Museum 
sign system, which creates an efficient 
and clear means of finding the exhibits 
and circulating through the museum. 



For the brochure Galileo, which com- 
bines illustration and computer images in 
a creative and interesting manner. 



National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration 
Jet Propulsion Laboratory 
Pasadena, California 



National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration 
Jet Propulsion Laboratory 
Pasadena, California 



National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration 
Jet Propulsion Laboratory 
Pasadena, California 



National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration 
Jet Propulsion Laboratory 
Pasadena, California 



National Endowment for 
the Arts 

Design Arts Program 
Washington, D.C. 



National Endowment for 
the Arts 

Design Arts Program 
Washington, D.C. 



National Endowment for 

the Arts 

Design Arts Program 

Washington, D.C. 

With U.S. Department of 

Transportation 



National Gallery of Art 
Washington, D.C. 



National Gallery of Art 
Washington, D.C. 



For the 1979 Annual Report, a model 
for clear, informative and dignified re- 
ports. 



For the brochure Voyager Flights to Ju- 
piter and Saturn, which combines excel- 
lent graphics with clear prose that ex- 
plains the significance of the flights in 
terms the laymen can understand. 



For the 1 980 brochure Voyager at Sat- 
urn, which contains magnificent photo- 
graphs from the nether reaches of the so- 
lar system. 



For the poster series Voyager Encounters 
Jupiter, elegant graphics that capture the 
vastness of interstellar space. 



For the Main Street Program, a pres- 
ervation strategy developed by the Na- 
tional Trust for Historic Preservation to 
revitalize the downtowns of small com- 
munities. 



For the Artists Permanent Studio Build- 
ing in Boston. In 1980 a group of artists 
acquired the building, then a vacant mill, 
and converted it into live/work space. 
The project has become a model for sim- 
ilar efforts in artists' communities across 
the country. 



For the Design for Transportation Na- 
tional Awards, a program aimed at in- 
creasing public awareness of the need for 
design excellence in transportation. 



For the catalogue of the John Hay Whit- 
ney Collection. 



For the catalogue of the gallery's collec- 
tion of Alfred Steiglitz photographs. 



PRESIDENTIAL DESIGN AWARDS 225 



National Gallery of Art 
Washington, D.C. 



Smithsonian Institution 
Cooper-Hewitt Museum 
New York, New York 



Smithsonian Institution 
Cooper-Hewitt Museum 
New York, New York 



Smithsonian Institution 
National Air and Space 
Museum 
Washington, D.C. 



Smithsonian Institution 
National Portrait Gallery 
Washington, D.C. 



Smithsonian Institution 
National Portrait Gallery 
Washington, D.C. 



Smithsonian Institution 
Office of Bicentennial 
Coordination 
Washington, DC. 



Tennessee Valley Authority 
Architectural Branch 
Knoxville, Tennessee 



Tennessee Valley Authority 
Architectural Branch 
Knoxville, Tennessee 



For fifteen exhibitions of consistently 
high quaHty. These included the Trea- 
sures of Tutankhamun, El Greco of To- 
ledo, the Splendors of Dresden and 
American Art at Mid-Century. 



For the catalogue American Enterprise: 
Nineteenth-Century Patent Model, 
which records an important exhibition at 
the museum. 



For the anthology Cities: The Forces 
That Shape Them, sixty-five essays by 
distinguished writers about urban design. 



For the poster series The Maiden Flight 
of the Space Shuttle Columbia, which 
achieves a commendable blend of typog- 
raphy, photography and printing. 



For the exhibition and catalogue, 
Charles Willson Peak and His World, 
an overview of Peal's career as artist, sci- 
entist and inventor. 



For the exhibition and catalogue entitled 
Robert Cornelius: Portraits from the 
Dawn of Photography. 



For the Mall Graphics Program, an ex- 
ample of strong, appropriate directional 
and identification graphics. 



For the Barn Rebuilding Project. When 
severe flooding in the spring of 1977 de- 
stroyed 32 barns in Hancock and 
Claiborne counties in Tennessee, the 
Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) led 
the effort to rebuild them. 



For the Design Assistance Program, in 
which TVA architects work with build- 
ing owners in a seven-state region on en- 
ergy-saving strategies. 



Tennessee Valley Authority 
Architectural Branch 
Knoxville, Tennessee 



U.S. Army Corps of 

Engineers 

Lackland Air Force Base, 

Texas 

With Air Force Systems 

Command 



U.S. Army Corps of 
Engineers 
Baltimore District 
Baltimore, Maryland 



U.S. Army Corps of 

Engineers 

Los Angeles District 

Los Angeles, California 



U.S. Army Corps of 

Engineers 

Memphis Engineering 

Division 

Memphis, Tennessee 



U.S. Army Corps of 

Engineers 

Nashville Enginering 

District 

Nashville, Tennessee 



U.S. Army Corps of 

Engineers 

San Francisco District 

San Francisco, California 



US. Army Corps of 

Engineers 

St. Louis District 

St. Louis, Missouri 



For the Valley Adventure, an exhibition 
celebrating TVA's fiftieth anniversary. 
The exhibition was based on a barge and 
toured the Tennessee River system in the 
summer of 1983. 



For a new energy plant for the Wilfred 
Hall Medical Center. The plant supplies 
all the facility's energy needs and, 
through use of advanced technologies, re- 
duces waste to a minimum. 



For the Tioga-Hammond Lakes project 
in Tioga County, Pennsylvania. Two 
earthen dams reduce downstream flood- 
ing, provide recreational facilities and 
improve downstream water quality with 
minimum intrusion on the landscape. 



For the Indian Bend Wash project in 
Maricopa County, Arizona. The project 
integrates flood-control protection for the 
cities of Scottsdale and Tempe with 
open-space recreational opportunities. 



For the W G. Huxtable pumping plant, 
which provides flood protection to the St. 
Francis River basin in Lee County, Ar- 
kansas. The plant was designed to con- 
form with the rural environment. 



For the Wolf Creek Dam diaphragm 
wall project. A novel engineering ap- 
proach restored the failing Wolf Creek 
Dam in Wayne County, Kentucky, while 
the dam and the hyro plant were in full 
operation. 



For The Year of the Coast booklets, a 
well-designed series of publications focus- 
ing on ways to manage, preserve and pro- 
tect the nation's coastal areas. 



For the St. Louis flood protection 
project, which protects the city from the 
Mississippi River. Begun in 1959 and 
completed in 1975, the project achieved 
many "firsts" in the design of flood-con- 
trol works. 



226 CHAPTER SIX 



U.S. Army Corps of 

Engineers 

St. Paul Engineering 

Division 

St. Paul. Minnesota 



U.S. Army Corps of 
Engineers 
Seattle District 
Seattle, Washington 



U.S. Army Corps of 

Engineers 

Visual Information Branch 

Washington, DC. 



U.S. Department of 
Agriculture 
Forest Service 
Washington, D.C. 



U.S. Department of 
Agriculture 
Forest Service 
Washington, D.C. 



U.S. Department of 

Agriculture 

Soil Conservation Service 

Washington, D.C. 



U.S. Department of the Air 

Force 

Air Force Systems 

Command 

Washington, D.C. 

With U.S. Army Corps of 

Engineers 



For the Locks and Dam No. 1 rehabilita- 
tion project. When the original facilities 
on the Mississippi River at Minneapolis, 
Minnesota, developed hydraulic prob- 
lems, the Corps of Engineers rehabili- 
tated them in a way that made it possi- 
ble to maintain operations during 
construction. 



For the Libby Dam in Kootenai River, 
Montana. Concern for the environment 
led the Corps of Engineers to undertake 
extraordinary efforts to integrate the 
project into the landscape and minimize 
its intrusive effect. 



For the graphic standards manual, which 
developed a unified communication sys- 
tem in use since 1 980. 



For the Visual Management System, 
which aims to retain the natural land- 
scape, where possible, and reduce the vi- 
sual impact of human activities on the 
191 million acres of national forest under 
the protection of the Forest Service. 



For the truss-framed system for residen- 
tial and light commercial buildings. The 
innovative construction method uses less 
wood for framing, allows lighter wood 
and reduces the construction costs of a 
home. 



For Pine Creek Detention Basin, a flood- 
control facility designed to blend in with 
its natural surroundings and to be used 
for recreational purposes. 



For the Total Energy Plant. See U.S. 
Army Corps of Engineers. 



U.S. Department of the Air 

Force 

Directorate of Engineering 

and Services 

Washington, DC. 



U.S. Department of the Air 

Force 

United States Air Force 

Academy 

Colorado Springs, Colorado 



U.S. Department of the 

Army 

Natick Research, 

Development and 

Engineering Center 

Natick, Massachusetts 



U.S. Department of 

Commerce 

Economic Development 

Administration 

Washington, D.C. 



U.S. Department of 
Housing and Urban 
Development 
Washington, DC. 



U.S. Department of 
Housing and Urban 
Development 
Washington, D.C. 



U.S. Department of 
Housing and Urban 
Development 
Community Planning and 
Development Division 
Washington, D.C. 



U.S. Department of 
Housing and Urban 
Development 
Boston Regional Office 
Boston, Massachusetts 



For the sign standards developed to im- 
prove the appearance of 412 bases over- 
seas and 1 1 3 domestic installations. The 
sign standards cover all aspects from 
base identification signs to bulletin 
boards. 



For the Cadet Library addition, a func- 
tional and architecturally elegant build- 
ing that blends with the original building 
and with the site. 



For the new U.S. Army helmet, which 
offers greater protection and comfort at 
no increase in weight. 



For the Maymont Park Japanese Garden 
in Richmond, Virginia, which serves as 
an education, cultural and recreational 
center for the region. 



For the Unified Visual Communications 
System, which covers everything from 
stationery and publications to exhibits 
and signs. 



For the Urban Environmental Design 
Program, which promoted design as a ba- 
sic tool for solving certain urban prob- 
lems. 



For Japanese Village Plaza, a shopping 
center especially for the Japanese-Ameri- 
can community. The plaza, designed to 
reflect the ethnic culture, has helped to 
revitalize a once-declining area in Los 
Angeles. 



For the James Steam Mill housing for 
the elderly in Newburyport, Massachu- 
setts. In converting an idle and aban- 
doned steam mill into attractive housing 
for the elderly, the National Park Ser- 
vice has retained many of the original el- 
ements, reminders of the building's his- 
toric past. 



PRESIDENTIAL DESIGN AWARDS 227 



U.S. Department of 
Housing and Urban 
Development 
Boston Regional Office 
Boston, Massachusetts 



U.S. Department of 
Housing and Urban 
Development 
Manchester Field Office 
Manchester, New 
Hampshire 



U.S. Department of 
Housing and Urban 
Development 
Sacramento Field Office 
Sacramento, California 



U.S. Department of 

Housing and Urban 

Development 

San Francisco Regional 

Office 

San Francisco, California 



U.S. Department of the 

Interior 

U.S. Geological Survey 

Washington, DC. 



U.S. Department of the 

Interior 

U.S. Geological Survey 

Washington, D.C. 



U.S. Department of the 

Interior 

U.S. Geological Survey 

Washington, DC. 



U.S. Department of the 

Interior 

National Park Service 

Publications Office/ 

Interpretive Design Center 

Harpers Ferry, West 

Virginia 



For the Putnam School housing for the 
elderly in Cambridge, Massachusetts. A 
partnership with the Cambridge Housing 
Authority and a private developer turned 
an abandoned schoolhouse into twenty- 
seven living units for elderly and handi- 
capped persons and saved a building 
which is on the National Register of His- 
torical Places. 



For Pinewood Manor in Old Orchard 
Beach, Maine. The project illustrates a 
sensitive design approach to many of the 
problems of semi-independent living for 
elderly persons. 



For Alkali Flats family housing, which 
blends low-income housing into turn-of- 
the-century streetscapes and Victorian 
structures. 



For Kauhale Nani — Beautiful Village — 
in Wahiawa, Oahu, Hawaii. This low-in- 
come public housing project uses modest 
materials in an artful manner to form 
spaces of unusual quality. 



For Map Data Catalog and Minicatalog 
of Map Data. These well-designed guides 
to the cartographic holdings of federal, 
state and private agencies offer easy ac- 
cess to information not previously avail- 
able from one source. 



For US GeoData digital cartographic 
and geographic data publications. The 
materials include publications, posters 
and other materials. 



For the graphic standards manual, which 
has enabled the agency to achieve a con- 
sistent level of design quality and to re- 
duce publication costs. 



For the Bicentennial Program, in which 
the agency drew on the talents of distin- 
guished historians, writers, illustrators 
and designers to produce books, pam- 
phlets and posters of exceptional merit. 



U.S. Department of the 

Interior 

National Park Service 

Interpretive Design Center 

Harpers Ferry, West 

Virginia 



U.S. Department of the 

Interior 

Denver Service Center 

Denver, Colorado 



U.S. Department of the 

Interior 

Denver Service Center 

Denver, Colorado 



U.S. Department of the 

Interior 

Denver Service Center 

Denver, Colorado 



U.S. Department of the 

Interior 

Denver Service Center 

Denver, Colorado 



For a series of seven exhibits that treat 
such topics as the Nez Perce Indians, 
Yellowstone National Park and Antietam 
National Battlefield with unusual sensi- 
tivity. 



For the Jordan Pond House Restaurant 
and Visitor Center in Acadia National 
Park, Maine, a superior building that 
blends in with a beautiful landscape. 



For the new management approach de- 
veloped for Klondike Gold Rush Na- 
tional Historic Park. The approach calls 
for cooperation from state, federal and 
local agencies both to preserve the his- 
toric setting and to encourage growth. 



For the Lowell National Historic Park 
Visitor Center in Lowell, Massachusetts. 
The visitor center, once an abandoned 
mill, is an excellent example of adaptive 
reuse. 



For the plans for the Santa Monica 
Mountains National Recreation Area. 
Developing a plan to transform the 
150,000 acres of mountains and seashore 
into a national recreation area involved 
cooperation among many agencies. 




The array of publications produced by the National Park Service 
bears the distinctive stamp of the agency's Unigrid Design Sys- 
tem, a set of design principles that integrate text and visuals. 



228 CHAPTER SIX 



U.S. Department of the 

Interior 

Historic American Buildings 

Survey 

Washington, D.C. 



U.S. Department of Justice 
U.S. District Court 
Denver, Colorado 



U.S. Department of Justice 
Visual Systems Group 
Washington, DC. 



U.S. Department of the 

Navy 

Naval Sea Systems 

Command 

Washington, DC. 



U.S. Department of the 

Navy 

Western Division 

Portland, Oregon 



U.S. Department of State 
Washington, DC. 



U.S. Department of 
Transportation 
Federal Aviation 
Administration 
Washington, DC. 



U.S. Department of 
Transportation 
Federal Aviation 
Administration 
Washington, D.C. 



U.S. Department of 
Transportation 
Federal Railroad 
Administration 
Washington, D.C. 



For What Style Is It? A Guide to Ameri- 
can Architecture. This strong, clear 
guide went through six printings before a 
revised edition was prepared. 



For the restoration of Courtroom A, lo- 
cated in Denver's main post office. The 
room had been redesigned as an audito- 
rium in 1965, and the restoration re- 
turned to service a fine historic space. 



For the graphics standards manual, 
which established a unified system for 
the department's communications. 



For a newly designed winch, now part of 
U.S. Navy standard underway replenish- 
ment machinery. The new winch is reli- 
able, safe, rugged and easily manufac- 
tured. 



For the Personnel Services Complex in 
Bremerton, Washington. The below- 
grade earth-bermed building is highly en- 
ergy-efficient and blends into its natural 
landscape. 



For the graphics standards manual, a 
commendable system in use since 1980. 



For the Orlando International Airport 
passenger terminal complex, a large com- 
plex which, through skillful design, pre- 
serves the most desirable features of the 
natural landscape and respects the abun- 
dant Florida wildlife. 



For the graphics standards manual, 
which is especially notable for the rede- 
signed agency symbol, which has been 
incorporated into all publications and sta- 
tionery. 



For the restoration and renovation of the 
interior of the historic Baltimore Pennsyl- 
vania Station, once again a grand space. 



U.S. Department of 
Transportation 
Washington, DC. 
With the National 
Endowment for the Arts 



U.S. Department of the 

Treasury 

Internal Revenue Service 

Washington, DC. 



U.S. Department of the 

Treasury 

Internal Revenue Service 

Washington, D.C. 



U.S. Department of the 

Treasury 

Internal Revenue Service 

Washington, D.C. 



U.S. Government Printing 

Office 

Division of Typography and 

Design 

Washington, D.C. 



U.S. Government Printing 

Office 

Division of Typography and 

Design 

Washington, D.C. 



U.S. Information Agency 
Exhibits Service 
Washington, D.C. 



U.S. Information Agency 
Publications Division 
Washington, D.C. 



U.S. Postal Service 

Stamp Development Branch 

Washington, D.C. 



For the Design for Transportation na- 
tional awards. See National Endowment 
for the Arts. 



For a series of posters announcing the 
annual meeting of the General Assembly 
of the Inter-American Center of Tax Ad- 
ministrators. The poster imagery creates 
strong visual identification for the 
agency. 



For the Understanding Taxes Series, 
1981-1984, a course designed to teach 
high-school students about their rights 
and responsibilities as taxpayers. The se- 
ries is creative in both editorial concept 
and in execution. 



For the 1040 Tax Form and Instructions. 
In 1978 the form was redesigned; the 
new forms were simpler and easier to use 
as well as less intimidating. 



For Railroad Maps of North America 
and Perspectives on John Philip Sousa, 
two books commended for the generally 
high quality of their design. 



For the redesigned Federal Register, 
which is not only easier to read but also 
gets six percent more text on each page. 



For a number of outstanding exhibits, in- 
cluding Ocean Expo '75 and The World 
of Franklin and Jefferson. 



For Dialogue magazine, an eighty-page 
quarterly whose purpose is to reflect 
American culture, society and institu- 
tions. In tioing this, the magazine main- 
tains a high level of journalistic and de- 
sign excellence. 



For the design of its 1982-83 stamp 
commemorating science and industry. 



PRESIDENTIAL DESIGN AWARDS 229 



Veterans Administration 
Rehabilitation Research and 
Development Center 
Palo Alto, California 



For the handbike, which enables persons 
with lower-limb disabilities to enjoy the 
benefits of riding a bicycle. 



1988 Presidential Design Awards 



National Aeronautics and 

Space Administration 

Goddard Space Flight 

Center 

Greenbelt, Maryland 



National Gallery of Art 
Washington, DC. 



Pennsylvania Avenue 
Development Corporation 
Washington, DC. 



U.S. Department of the 

Interior 

National Park Service 

Denver Service Center 

Denver, Colorado 



U.S. Department of the 

Interior 

National Park Service 

Mid-Atlantic Region 

Narrowsburg, New York 



For the International Ultraviolet Ex- 
plorer Spacecraft and Telescope — a joint 
venture with the United Kingdom and 
the European Space Agency — one of the 
most important tools yet devised for ex- 
ploration of stars, nebulae and galaxies. 



For its many-faceted exhibition graph- 
ics — banners, varied and inviting en- 
trances, photomurals and captions; for 
the precedent-setting exhibition. The 
Treasure Houses of Britain; and for two 
beautiful catalogues — American Furni- 
ture from the Kaufman Collection and 
Piranesi: Early Architectural Fantasies. 



For the Pennsylvania Avenue Plan, 
which rehabilitated and revitalized the 
sixteen blocks between the U.S. Capitol 
and the White House — the nation's sym- 
bolic Main Street. 



For the Boxley Valley Land Use Plan, 
which analyzed the landscape and land 
use patterns along the Buffalo National 
River in Arkansas and proposed a man- 
agement plan that will preserve this sig- 
nificant rural agricultural zone. 



For the renovation of the Delaware Aq- 
ueduct, which was constructed between 
1847 and 1848 and is the earliest surviv- 
ing work of John A. Roebling, designer 
of the Brooklyn Bridge. The renovation 
has accommodated the needs of traffic 
while maintaining the integrity of the 
structure. 



U.S. Department of the 

Interior 

National Park Service 

Washington, D.C. 



U.S. Department of 
Transportation 
Federal Highway 
Administration 
Washington, D.C. 



U.S. Department of 

Transportation 

Urban Mass Transportation 

Administration 



U.S. Department of 
Transportation 
Federal Highway 
Administration 
Washington, D.C. 



The Southwest Corri- 
dor Project in Boston 
is an outstanding ex- 
ample of civic design 
and transportation 
planning. The 
Ruggles Street Sta- 
tion is part of a 13- 
year. $747-million- 
dollar effort that 
culminated in a 4.7 
mile, eight-station 
transit line distin- 
guished by commu- 
nity involvement in 
the planning process 
and fine architecture. 



For the Vietnam Veteran's Memorial, 
which commemorates by name the 
58,000 Americans who died in Vietnam. 
The names are carved onto two black 
granite walls that form a broad "V" em- 
bracing a shallow bowl of grass. One side 
of the "V" aligns with the Lincoln Me- 
morial, the other with the Washington 
Monument. 



For the New Sunshine Skyway Bridge 
across Tampa Bay in Florida. The bridge 
is a superb technical achievement as well 
as a work of art. It is constructed with 
cables supporting the center of the road- 
bed rather than the traditional outer 
edges. This gives it a thin silhouette that 
seems to float in mid-air, an effect made 
more dramatic by its 1 , 200-foot central 
span. 



For the Southwest Corridor Project in 
Boston, Massachusetts, a model of trans- 
portation design and planning. This 1 3- 
year, $747-miIlion effort resulted in a 
4.7-mile, eight-station transit line distin- 
guished by fine architecture and land- 
scaping and community involvement in 
the planning process. 



For the East Huntington Bridge over the 
Ohio River between Huntington, West 
Virginia, and Proctorville, Ohio. The 
bridge is an achievement of technical, 
economical and aesthetic significance. It 
is also the first successful hybridization 
of structural steel and prestressed con- 
crete in the main girders of a bridge. 




230 CHAPTER SIX 



U.S. Department of 

Transportation 

Urban Mass Transportation 

Administration 

Chicago. Illinois 



For the 7.6-mile addition to Chicago's 
rapid transit system that brought an ex- 
isting inner-city line to O'Hare Interna- 
tional Airport. The terminal impresses 
users with its long people-movers, giant 
train hall and backlit serpentine glass- 
block walls. 



1988 Federal Design Achievement Awards 



Environmental Protection 

Agency 

Washington, D.C. 



Farm Credit Administration 
McLean. Virginia 



General Accounting Office 
Washington. DC. 



General Services 

Administration 

San Francisco, California 



For the graphic standards system, which 
has reduced formats, typographic choices 
and paper sizes, so that the agency's 
communications are clearer, more imagi- 
native and more efficiently produced. 



For the examination-announcement bro- 
chure, which was designed to attract the 
attention of talented college graduates, 
interest them in the agency's work and 
guide them through the application pro- 
cess. 



For the visual communications system, 
which has given GAO publications a 
consistent format and a strong agency 
identity. 



For the renovation of the Federal Build- 
ing used by the U.S. Ninth Circuit Court 
of Appeals and several other federal 
agencies. By renovating an old Pasadena, 
California, hotel complex into a federal 
building, the General Services Adminis- 
tration has preserved an important com- 
munity landmark and has provided the 
judges and federal employees with a 
beautifully detailed, high-quality office 
environment. 



General Services 
Administration 
Washington, D.C. 



National Endowment for 
the Arts 

Design Arts Program 
Washington, D.C. 



National Endowment for 
the Arts 

Design Arts Program 
Washington, D.C. 



National Endowment for 
the Arts 

Design Arts Program 
Washington, D.C. 



Office of Personnel 
Management 
Washington, D.C. 



Smithsonian Institution 
Cooper-Hewitt Museum 
New York, New York 



For the restoration of the 1 879 Office of 
the Secretary of the Navy. The project 
used easel-painting conservation tech- 
niques commonly employed in Europe 
but not previously used in the United 
States. State-of-the-art electrical and me- 
chanical systems were unobtrusively in- 
troduced without disturbing the room, 
which, while historically accurate, is still 
a working environment. 



For Building by Design, a program con- 
ducted by the Illinois Arts Council. Sup- 
ported by a grant from the National En- 
dowment for the Arts, the council 
encouraged communities to analyze their 
needs for facilities for the arts and draw 
up careful plans that would benefit both 
the artists and the communities. 



For the Competitive Edge Program, con- 
ducted by the University of Michigan 
with support from the National Endow- 
ment for the Arts. The objective of the 
program was to demonstrate how quality 
design is a business resource that in- 
creases profits, productivity and prestige. 



For the design program of the Massachu- 
setts Council on the Arts and Human- 
ities, which was supported by a grant 
from the National Endowment for the 
Arts. Initiated in 1984, the Massachu- 
setts design program encouraged the lay 
public to become aware of the impor- 
tance of design. 



For the Council of Federal Interior De- 
signers, a nonprofit organization of pro- 
fessionals employed by the federal gov- 
ernment in interior design and space 
planning. The council works to promote 
design excellence in the public sector. 



For Wine: Celebration and Ceremony, a 
catalogue of the museum's exhibit on de- 
sign in the service of wine. The illustra- 
tions include processional vessels, illumi- 
nated manuscripts, tapestries, fine 
crystal, silver, engravings, sculptures, 
painting and myriad bottles, all testifying 
to the fact that extraordinary design has 
surrounded the art of wine-making. 






I 



PRESIDENTIAL DESIGN AWARDS 231 



Smithsonian Institution 
National Portrait Gallery 
Washington, D.C. 



U.S. Agency for 
International Development 
Gaborone, Republic of 
Botswana 



U.S. Army Corps of 

Engineers 

Fort Worth, Texas 



U.S. Army Corps of 
Engineers 
Washington, D.C. 



U.S. Army Corps of 

Engineers 

Walla Walla, Washington 



For excellence in mounting exhibitions, 
particularly for: 1) the reinstallation of 
the permanent collection; 2) the Gaston 
Lachaise exhibition, a display of more 
than fifty portrait sculptures; and 3) the 
John Frazee exhibition, in which a period 
milieu was created to highlight the work 
of this early nineteenth-century sculptor. 



For the Botswana Technology Center, 
which exemplifies outstanding thermal 
design. The objective was to create a 
comfortable office environment without 
resorting to fossil-fuel heating and cool- 
ing. The answer involved careful site 
planning and material selection as well as 
constructing shaded verandas and other 
energy-efficient features. The building 
has a touching simplicity and is at home 
with its native African concept. 



For the Red River Army Depot steam 
plant, which uses low-cost coal, scrap 
products and any combination of the two 
to produce steam. The use of such alter- 
native fuels is one way to lessen the de- 
pendence on imported oil and nuclear 
power. The successful operation has a 
broad range of applications. 



For the sign standards program. Initiated 
in 1982, the program was designed to 
cover needs in 4,500 recreation facilities 
and 430 navigation and flood-control 
projects. Extensive research and compre- 
hensive testing resulted in a handsome, 
readable and cost-eff"ective system, which 
uses simple, bold typography and inter- 
national sign symbology to carry a great 
variety of messages to a diverse public 
audience. 



For the Willow Creek Dam, which pio- 
neered the use of roller-compacted con- 
crete in the world's first concrete gravity 
dam constructed entirely of this material. 
The dam will provide recreational facili- 
ties and wildlife development opportuni- 
ties for citizens in the area of Heppner, 
Oregon. 



U.S. Army Corps of 
Engineers 
Omaha, Nebraska 



U.S. Department of 

Agriculture 

Forest Service 

Pacific Northwest Region 

Portland, Oregon 



U.S. Department of 
Agriculture 
Forest Service 
Tucson, Arizona 



U.S. Department of the 

Army 

Training Support Center 

Fort Eustis, Virginia 



U.S. Department of the 

Army 

U.S. Army Engineer 

Division 

Stuttgart, West Germany 



U.S. Department of the 

Army 

U.S. Army Engineer 

Division 

Karlsruhe, West Germany 



For stabilizing the banks of the Missouri 
River along the Karl E. Mundt National 
Wildlife Refuge in South Dakota. The 
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service formed a 
partnership with the U.S. Army Corps of 
Engineers to stabilize the eroding shore- 
line, which was destroying forests used 
by eagles as a winter roost. The project 
improved the visual quality of the water- 
front and saved the trees. 



For the Mount St. Helens Visitor Center, 
a dramatic memorial to the volcanic 
eruption of March 18, 1980. The center's 
setting in the national forest demands 
use of rugged natural materials. The in- 
terior concept is admirable and the work- 
manship in stone and wood exemplary. 



For the Visual Prioritization Process, an 
innovative method of allocating the re- 
sources for restoring the landscape dur- 
ing highway construction. It is a means 
of identifying the impact of construction 
on the land and of planning mitigation 
measures such as regrading, replanting 
or avoiding particularly fragile areas. 



For Army Trainer magazine, which 
shares information about maintaining 
and improving the quality of U.S. Army 
training programs. The magazine is at- 
tractive and has a commendable graphic 
freshness. 



For the Patch Barracks in Stuttgart, 
West Germany. The project showed 
imagination and skill in dealing with the 
difficult problem of providing security 
without making the structure look like 
fortification. Plantings, terraced berms, 
cobblestone paving and other sensitively 
designed details have enhanced the hu- 
man scale without sacrificing security. 



For the bowling facility at Karlsruhe, 
West Germany. Built as a social center 
for use by U.S. military personnel, the 
building makes good use of material to 
off'er a playful image. It is a successful 
collaboration among the Army and local 
architects, planners and contractors. 



232 CHAPTER SIX 



U.S. Department of 
Education 
Washington, D.C. 



U.S. Department of 
Housing and Urban 
Development 
Community Planning and 
Development Division 
Columbia, South Carolina 



U.S. Department of 

Housing and Urban 

Development 

Los Angeles Office 

Los Angeles, California 



U.S. Department of 
Housing and Urban 
Development 
Baltimore Office 
Baltimore. Maryland 



U.S. Department of 
Housing and Urban 
Development 
Washington, D.C. 



U.S. Department of 
Housing and Urban 
Development 
Washington, D.C. 



For a 65-page brochure entitled What 
Works? The brochure conveys a great 
deal of information about teaching in an 
exceptionally clear manner and in a for- 
mat that is both concise and compelling. 



For the design of Charleston's waterfront 
garages, which have been skillfu